Luigi

We've said it before and we'll say it again: Luigi's Mansion 3 is a wonderful game. There's something immensely satisfying about wandering around and exploring the hotel at your own pace, and while the lack of any real RPG-style upgrades for Luigi to work towards might put some players off, it no doubt makes the ride more enjoyable for others.

The game's director, Bryce Holliday, has shared a fascinating little tidbit of info regarding this very topic in an interview with Kotaku. As the conversation turned towards the seemingly endless amount of cash stashed away in the hotel - and particularly the way in which this cash can be spent by players - Holliday, along with lead producer Kensuke Tanabe and producer Yoshihito Ikebata, revealed that an upgrade system simply wasn't needed.

Holliday: "Upgrades and skill trees aren’t very Luigi. He is a reluctant hero who already has the skills and bravery needed to tackle any problem. Players are helping Luigi overcome his nervousness to expose his true talents. Cleaning, destroying and collecting are engaging, Zen experiences that everyone is familiar with since childhood. It is compelling even if there is no other reason than the act itself.”

It's a surprisingly deep response, and one that actually makes a lot of sense. Completing new tasks in-game often ends up with Luigi letting out an almost relieved sigh, surprised at himself for being able to defeat the ghouls around him. It's a nice change of pace having a character like Luigi taking centre stage, so perhaps it's only right that the game itself changes things up a little, too?

In the same interview, Ikebata said, "We had decided from the beginning that [the cash] would be used as an evaluation criteria for when you clear the game". Apparently the team had considered having players spend their money on the hints you can get from E. Gadd, but ultimately decided this would put people off asking for help.

If you're interested, you can read the full interview right here.

Have you played Luigi's Mansion 3 yet? Do you like it the way it is, or would you have prefered it to take on one or two RPG traits? Let us know in the comments.

[via kotaku.com]