It's been many years now since Nintendo changed the game with Wii, the little motion-controlled console which broke away from the competition and started a revolution. Its brilliantly compact design (the size of three DVD boxes, remember?) and approachable and accessible controller helped it open up gaming to a whole new audience, young and old alike.

Despite its reputation as a casual, 'kiddy' console, Nintendo Wii hosted a huge library of fantastic and varied titles, the best of which took advantage of its unique controller and provided opportunities for experiences that simply weren't being offered on other consoles at the time. Thanks to the efforts of Nintendo Life readers, we've now assembled our list of the top 50 Wii games ever.

Any Wii game with at least 50 User Ratings is eligible. Remember, though, that this list is not set in stone. The ranking will continue to evolve automatically according to user scores submitted to the Nintendo Life game database, so don't worry if you missed out on 'voting' — you can still do so by simply scrolling down and rating them now, and the order will be influenced!

You can find more details on the game by reading our vintage reviews, which are accessed by clicking the 'Review' button for each game (funny, that). And if you just can't get enough of ranked lists, we've previously assembled lists of the top 50 N64 games, 3DS games, Game Boy games, Nintendo DS games and GameCube games. More than enough to be getting on with!

If there's a game bubbling under the top 50 that you'd like to rate, feel free to find it using the search tool below and give it a score out of 10. Enough chatter — it's time to dive into our list of the top 50 Wii games ever. We begin, as is customary, at number 50...

Note. In order for games to become eligible, they need a minimum of 50 User Ratings in total.

50. Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon (Wii)

Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon (Wii)
Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon (Wii)
Publisher: Rising Star Games / Developer: tri-Crescendo
Release Date: 16th Mar 2010 (USA) / 19th Mar 2010 (UK/EU)

An action-RPG from Tri-Crescendo and Namco, Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon is an impressive little game which uses the Wii Remote to great effect and tells an affecting story. It's a tad downbeat, but worth returning to if you missed out back in 2010.

49. Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock (Wii)

Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock (Wii)
Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock (Wii)
Publisher: RedOctane / Developer: Neversoft
Release Date: 29th Oct 2007 (USA) / 23rd Nov 2007 (UK/EU)

Releasing at the zenith of the plastic instrument craze, Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock on Wii intergrated the Wii Remote's rumble and speaker into the gameplay — hardly a game changer, but a welcome addition in a game which plays largely the same regardless of platform. Rock on.

48. Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep (Wii)

Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep (Wii)
Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep (Wii)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Arika
Release Date: 22nd Feb 2010 (USA) / 5th Feb 2010 (UK/EU)

The Endless Ocean series continued its calming exploration the depths in this sequel which added a little more direction and structure to the first game's super-chilled marine diving. Don't get us wrong — you're not suddenly dealing with umpteen surprise shark attacks or infiltrating Emilio Largo's underwater complex in an orange wetsuit, but the sense of discovery in Endless Ocean 2: Adventures of the Deep (or Blue World as it was subtitled in North America) is just a little more guided this time. It's a lovely, calming experience — and we could all do with one of those these days.

47. BIT.TRIP COMPLETE (Wii)

BIT.TRIP COMPLETE (Wii)
BIT.TRIP COMPLETE (Wii)
Publisher: Aksys Games / Developer: Choice Provisions
Release Date: 13th Sep 2011 (USA) / 16th Mar 2012 (UK/EU)

BIT.TRIP COMPLETE combines all the beat-based WiiWare releases into a single compilation with extras thrown in for good measure, and delivers one of the most entertaining experiences on Wii. Commander Video's retro style never goes out of fashion, and this package still feels fresh all these years later.

46. No More Heroes (Wii)

No More Heroes (Wii)
No More Heroes (Wii)
Publisher: Rising Star Games / Developer: Grasshopper Manufacture
Release Date: 22nd Jan 2008 (USA) / 29th Feb 2008 (UK/EU)

No More Heroes certainly isn’t perfect; the tasks you’re given in-between missions are dull (calling to mind the same boredom experienced when you had to get a job in Sega’s Shenmue), the Grant Theft Auto-style driving sections border on the pointless (we can only assume they’re intended to be a thinly-veiled dig at the successful franchise) and the general gameplay doesn’t actually change during any of the assassination missions. But regardless of these points, it still entertains in a way that few other games can manage. It’s a chaotic riot packed with gleeful videogame references, over-the-top dialogue, and some seriously awesome-looking combat action. A far more accessible proposition than Killer7 ever was, No More Heroes is so wonderfully amusing that it’s easy to forgive its minor shortcomings; Suda 51’s epic fully deserved to garner the kind of attention and praise that unfortunately eluded its predecessor.

45. Monster Hunter 3 (Tri~) (Wii)

Monster Hunter 3 (Tri~) (Wii)
Monster Hunter 3 (Tri~) (Wii)
Publisher: Capcom / Developer: Capcom
Release Date: 20th Apr 2010 (USA) / 23rd Apr 2010 (UK/EU)

While Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate is arguably the best way to play Monster Hunter Tri, the original game is still an impressive piece of software from Capcom. It's something of a slow-burn, and certainly a daunting challenge if this is your first hunt, but the old-school monster hunting magic is in this game's DNA regardless of platform. If you have the fortitude to persevere through the first few hours, you'll find out why this series has only gone from strength to strength over the past decade.

44. Resident Evil (Wii)

Resident Evil (Wii)
Resident Evil (Wii)
Publisher: Capcom / Developer: Capcom
Release Date: 23rd Jun 2009 (USA) / 26th Jun 2009 (UK/EU)

A Wii port of the 2002 GameCube remake featuring new controls, Resident Evil (or Resident Evil Archives: Resident Evil to give its full title) provides what we came to expect from Wii re-releases of previous gen titles: a more accessible, incrementally improved control experience with box art that's a bit rubbish. Just concentrate on the horror of the game rather than the horror of the box and you're golden.

43. New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii)

New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii)
New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 15th Nov 2009 (USA) / 20th Nov 2009 (UK/EU)

The first 2D Mario game to come to a home console in many years, New Super Mario Bros. Wii brought chaotic four-player local multiplayer to the series for the first time and gave old-school fans yearning for a side-on Mushroom Kingdom adventure something to chew on, with plenty of clever nods to the past. The stylings of the 'New' series might not have been everyone's cup of tea, but anyone put off by the 'wah's and cuteness missed out on a real platforming treat.

42. Little King's Story (Wii)

Little King's Story (Wii)
Little King's Story (Wii)
Publisher: Rising Star Games / Developer: Cing
Release Date: 21st Jul 2009 (USA) / 24th Apr 2009 (UK/EU)

An excellent little explorative RTS game that holds its own against the Pikmin series. You're put in charge of a village and it's your job to ensure your citizens' happiness while expanding your kingdom upwards and outwards. Little King's Story is one of those games that is loved by all who play it, yet remains one of Wii's many 'hidden' gems. If it sounds at all enticing, we recommend tracking down a copy while they're easy to source — you won't regret it.

41. No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle (Wii)

No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle (Wii)
No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle (Wii)
Publisher: Ubisoft / Developer: Grasshopper Manufacture
Release Date: 26th Jan 2010 (USA) / 28th May 2010 (UK/EU)

Now available to play on Switch along with its predecessor, No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle continues the stylish (mis)adventures of Travis Touchdown in a sequel infused with the same punk-aesthetic, referential humour and sassy surrealism as the first game, except with the splintered edges sanded down to a still-pleasingly rough finish.