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Topic: Original Nintendo console broken

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ydono

I found my old Nintendo console with a bunch of games. It turns on but the red light flashes. When I put the games in (even before I put the games in) the tv flashes different colors. Any way to fix?

ydono

ydono

I forgot to mention it is the original nintendo console!

ydono

RedderRugfish

It's probably just dirty. Blow in the cartridges to see if that solves it temporarily. If it does, dip a q tip into rubbing alcohol and rub it on the contacts to clean them.

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ydono

@ReaderRagfish thanks for your quick reply. So, its the cartridges that are the problem, not the console?

ydono

RedderRugfish

@ydono It's probably both, putting a dirty cartridge into the console will get it dirty too. This was a very common thing and Nintendo sold a cleaning kit to solve it. But instead of buying that, everyone just blew in the cartridge to get the dust out until it worked. Nowadays people usually just clean them with a q tip and rubbing alcohol.

But yeah, the blinking power light and flashing colors just means that the console is having trouble connecting to the cartridge, most likely due to dust.

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Tasuki

You guys know that blowing in the cartridges does nothing. The problems with the original NES come from it's design not dust. It's the repeated action of pushing down on the cartridge once it's in the Nintendo that bends the connectors.

There are several ways to fix that problem which can be YouTubed or you can just get a top loader NES.

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RedderRugfish

@Tasuki I've heard that blowing does nothing and it's the repeated inserting and removing that makes it work, so I did an experiment. I took my old gameboy and a game that gives me trouble, and counted how many tries it took to get it to work, removing it without blowing between attempts. It took 13. Then I waited a while, and counted how many times took to work when I blew in it each before attempt. It took 2. I tried it again with a different gameboy, my nes, and my n64, and the result was still the same.

Conclusion: Blowing isn't a placebo. It's not the best way to fix your games, but it's not entirely correct to say it does nothing.

Mario Maker 2: JN2-5GV-VTF
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HobbitGamer

ydono wrote:

@ReaderRagfish thanks for your quick reply. So, its the cartridges that are the problem, not the console?

Do what Ragfish said, then also try barely inserting the cartridge, just enough that you can press the dock to the down spot, and turn it on. the combination of the two usually starts clearing those contacts up and while start getting it rolling normally again. Imagine a shower head junked up because of hard water and age, that's kind of like what you're starting with.

And contrary to popular belief, you are not some sort of acid-spitting creature that is going to destroy the very games you love by blowing on them. Blow in short bursts, not like a balloon, and you'll be fine.

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itslukec

If you can track down a security bit for a screw driver, opening the game and rubbing the dirt off the contacts with a polymer eraser is a guaranteed way to bring those games back to life. If you use the standard pink erasers you will scratch it. But it works 99% of the time with a polymer.

Also use 99% rubbing alcohol if you feel the need to apply it to the cartridge. The less water the better when cleaning electronics.

itslukec

RedderRugfish

I've often heard that blowing is bad for the games, and it probably isn't great, but millions of people have been doing it for over 30 years and I've never heard of anyone who messed up their game because of it.

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HobbitGamer

ReaderRagfish wrote:

I've often heard that blowing is bad for the games, and it probably isn't great, but millions of people have been doing it for over 30 years and I've never heard of anyone who messed up their game because of it.

Well, in 91 I blew on a copy of King of Kings. Next thing I know, old men appeared and started throwing frankincense and myrrh around, hitting a small child in the head. It was the, truthfully, the worse thing I could do.

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itslukec

@ReaderRagfish It is bad simply because it creates moisture. I have hundreds of NES games, and I can say without a doubt, blowing on them has zero positive benefit haha.

itslukec

Akuza89

it's usually the connector to the cart on the inside of the console that's probably the issue.

blowing in the cart/machine is meant to be bad for it, but 50% of the time it helps it work...so each to their own I guess..

the best way to ail the problem usually is by opening it up and replacing the connector, or just opening it and cleaning it with some ear buddies!

Edited on by Akuza89

Akuza89

ydono

So I plugged it back in and connected it. this time I can't even get passed connecting it to the tv. As soon as I plug the unit in, it begins to flash red on the unit. Then I connect it to the tv (using the component cables) and the tv flashes color and goes on and off saying weak signal. Are we sure it isn't something else wrong with the unit itself?

ydono

dharmajones93

This is a common issue with the original NES. The "push down" mechanism is poorly designed and fails to make contact after years of use. Even buying new pins and cleaning old ones often fails to fix the issue, as the real problem is where the pin connector meets the motherboard, not where the cart meets the pins. You absolutely need to clean the cart before attempting to use it; and do not blow on it, this creates moisture, creating corrosion, causing loss of contact. Blowing on them is exactly why many cartridges fail to make proper contact years later.
Anyway, the red blinking light is literally known as the "Blinking Red Light Failure." The only fail-safe method of fixing it is to replace the "push down mechanism." Google search "Blinking Red Light Win". I've been using it for several years and never had a NES game fail to load, and I clean up some pretty gnarly cartridges.
Good Luck and enjoy!

dharmajones93

ydono

UPDATE. I followed this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvvXVx3zanM and did the procedure which involved taking out the 72 pin, sanding it, lifting the pins, boiling it, drying it, rubbing alcohol and putting it all together. (also cleaning the connectors it slides onto). also snipping the part on the board that causes the blinking light. put it back together. I don't have the blinking light anymore but all I get on my tv is a red screen!!!!! now what????

ydono

ydono

I got the games to work!~ I have to put them in and reset a couple times first. that is normal? anyway, I am not sure what they are supposed to look like. it seems like something is wrong with them - although they do operate correctly. I have some pictures I took of the tv with them up so you can look at them and tell me if they look right. How do I get pictures in my post again?

ydono

NintendoPete

Don't recognize pic 8 but rest seems fine And yes - depending on the connectors it is common to put the cartridges in and out couple of times till they work.

NintendoPete

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