Forums

Topic: The Chit-Chat Thread

Posts 36,461 to 36,480 of 36,981

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX Yeah, the premium stuff is one thing, but I suppose part of the problem is for the most part premium is all that's available here. The "Average Joe" stuff ends up not profitable enough, especially with all prime real estate pricing & taxes, and has been closing rapidly. Businesses need to make mega-profits to keep the lights on....and average joes aren't providing returns on that kind of markup. Supermarkets (for now) are still here with "average joe" stuff, though they've been trying to move more upscale too. Though, honestly, ice cream is one of those weird things that there's nowhere left to actually GET ice cream (other than overpriced containers in a supermarket freezer that always melt by the time you get it home, then never taste right after they refreeze.) There's Dairy Queen's non-dairy soft serve. There's McD's. I suppose that's really our "average joe" stuff. There's the premium place 45+ min away (through the heart of Yuppieville).....I don't think there's actually anywhere else to get ice cream anymore, now that I think of it. Even Cold Stone, the chain upscale premium place that wasn't even that close closed years ago. There was a cool new frozen yogurt (sorry, FroYo - got to get my yoga pants and play the yuppie part) place I loved that lasted all of 2 years. Huh...I hadn't even realized all ice cream is gone (unless you count non-dairy, or sit-down restaurants that will serve you handmade ice cream for dessert for like $7.50 + tip. )

There may be a deli or two that has Hershey's (hard type, not soft type) ice cream. That's usually fairly expensive as well, but certainly not as outrageous as the others.

Pastries....fortunately I do have one 1960's bakery around that's very good and normal priced. The new places are "up scale" have tons of cupcakes (that appear to be the same cupcakes from the week before), have products that I know for a fact were just bought from Sam's Club (Walmart's wholesale club chain) cakes that most definitely were made from cake mix, not from scratch, and high prices to boot (funny thing about rich people. They can't taste the difference between a Walmart cake and something hand made by Julia Child. They just praise whatever is expensive enough and they're told is supposed to be premium.... )

Then there's Panera.....the nasty chain in every shopping center....."bakery cafes"....more like frozen bread reheating shop that brews burnt coffee beans in a push button dispenser. They put "paninis" on the map....then abandoned the category. They charge like $2.50 for a tiny slice of a bunt cake that looks like a supermarket bunt cake. Or $23 for a whole bunt cake (that absolutely should cost no more than $5.) $4 for a danish. Even the real bakery charges $1.75. Lux people shop there. It's trendy and happening in the now lol yolo! Most people just buy supermarket pastry. They're kind of soggy, and dunked in formaldehyde or something. They take a few weeks to go moldy even left out in July. If it's not July they may last months before they just kind of mummify into a dense, foam-like substance. I hear people praise how you don't need to bake stuff anymore because these stores just have so much wonderful stuff to choose from! They're like $18 for a 6" 1/2" single layer. Yet I swear 10 years ago they were $6.99 for a 10" that was thicker......

NEStalgia

ThanosReXXX

@NEStalgia "The "Average Joe" stuff ends up not profitable enough"

Ha, only in America, my friend. Only in America. Over here, it's completely, 100% embraced. It's by the masses FOR the masses, and no one is going to take that away from them, or there'll be hell to pay...

Never come between the Dutch and their comforts and things they're used to. Even entire government cabinets have paid the price for that...

But the ice cream shop in particular, is something of a different category. There's also bread shops, vegetable shops and other food stores like that, which still deliver the same service and quality that our grandparents were used to, and it's all artisan, handmade, hand-grown, hand-baked, whatever.

What with all the stories we've now shared about our surroundings and commodities, it would sure seem to me that you'd feel right at home here, and I'm betting that for the price that you're paying right now, you'd get twice the amount of house over here, if not more.

Either way, you should definitely come visit, whenever you have the chance and the budget to spare. I'll personally give you the grand tour of the place.

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX "by the masses for the masses." It doesn't seem like that long ago that's how it was here. Maybe it was longer ago than it feels like. In the rural south and so forth I'm certain it still is (and they are derided as the rednecks from "fly-over country".) Honestly I don't know how or when it changed. It seems like one day you just woke up and everything was different, and it was this weird feudal world of distinct segregated social classes. It wasn't really clear what changed it. You just knew it happened sometime in the recent past and you must have missed it when it happened. It went from what I guess you could consider the "working class" being the "middle class" and being what everything in society was built around to being the "professional class" is the "middle class" and everyone else is this weird "not actually poor, but not actually part of the running society either.". "The WalMart class?" perhaps. Except there's never a WalMart near anyone unless you live in a trailer park in Arkansas. Their entire business model revolves around buying ginormous cheap real estate in the middle of nowhere and making everyone travel to them.

But that's amazing, "artisan" "handmade" etc. etc. are all considered "premium" here....McDonalds may have lost popularity, and it's the unviersal punching bag, but really, it's a summary. The chemical, processed, preserved stuff is what there is for the average joe, and if you want better than what's in the trough, you're going to have to move up in the classes and pay up. People are "more conscious about health" but what they really mean is "upwardly mobile yuppies with money to spend on premium things are more conscious about health, but mostly they're conscious about image, and right now healthfulness is an image booster lifestyle. " The masses have simply accepted their fates that chem-paks from Walmart/McD's and faux-healthy are all they're ever going to get, so just get used to it and be quiet. McDonalds is a poster child, but they're not really that special. It's more an entire category of product here. Truthfully I've never been a huge fan of Europe's way of doing things, at least in the past, but at some point it feels like we picked up the worst of it, and Europe moderated a bit. Plus a decade ago "European style" everything was the trendy thing for yuppies, but it was of course the mutilated touristy version of what Europe is rather than the reality of it. But it's Pavlov's continent...you hear Euro anything and you think of last decade's version of this decades FroYo Yoga Night and gnash your teeth accordingly

I just thought of another thing you can't get anywhere. Shoes. There's absolutely nowhere to buy a pair of shoes closer than 30 minutes away (with zero traffic - closer to 45 min in typical traffic, over an hour, in peak traffic) (and Amazon.) There were a few Paylesses in the area - the whole chain just closed. I didn't really shop there, but the places I did shop are gone or have become much farther to get to with all the construction between here and there in the past few years (what used to be a 15 minute trip is now a 30-40 minute trip.) What replaced the closest one? A salon where you get your own private studio to get your hair cut in. I'm guessing $150-200 for a haircut? I should get into redneck character and go into the store and find out "Howdy - y'all got summa 'dem fancy papers with the numers on'em for howsabaout as much as 'ese here barbers cost?" I think my new goal in life is just p*s off all the yuppies as often and severely as possible. Sure I'd be little more than a clown but darnit I'm going to be the most annoying nuisance clown in history. I'm offended these people are allowed to live and I demand someone do something about that! They're harshing my mellow. I should start a change.org petition.

Not that Payless was exactly known for great shoes, but other than probably some fancy boutique that sells Italian leather shoes to lawyers, shoes, sneakers, sandals (other than drug store sandals)....I just realized now that if I need a pair of shoes, there's not actually anywhere that sells them without going a long way out or waiting 2+ days for Amazon.

Haha, you may be right, I may well like it. NED is never a place that particularly stood out to me as interesting or of particular attraction, but it's hard to get a sense of daily live versus what you see on the outside of any place which is always more tourist related. Not that moving internationally is by any means cheap or really practical as you have to sell off a lot of the things you've proudly owned or preserved as well.

NEStalgia

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX (Also, as for "average joes" not being profitable, it is sadly true, unless you're Walmart, technically the biggest retailer that does just that. Business here is all about charging the max the market sustains, and the landlords in stores price the space according to that expectation about the maximum output a store in the area could generate (or a doctor's office...) ) Do you think you'll meet the landlord's pricing by selling quality ice cream at a marginal profit to the average person, or by selling designer $800 hadbags to corporate vice presidents and senior financial analysts if there's enough of them in the area to buy them? Or better, most shopping centers get a 1-3% cut of the gross a store generates. Think 1% of a few dozen $800 handbags a month gets them more, or 1% of an orthopedic surgeon charging $10,000 per procedure against insurance companies with a 10% co-pay? NOW you see the depth of our retail crisis, and why shopping center owners are actively forcing all normal stores out. Then they blame Amazon.)

NEStalgia

HobbitGamer

@NEStalgia You really sound more like you belong in the southeast, cuz we still have all those things. We even still have a Main Street with local restaurants and businesses. Farmer’s market takes a block every Saturday, first Friday of every month is a small festival with vendors and bands. There’s even a shoe repair store. Yet 4 miles from all that is our mall and a Walmart. You may have to drive 15 minutes to get to town proper, but the drive is sprinkled with corn, peanut, and cotton fields.

#TeamPineapple
#MeatAndGreet

Switch Friend Code: SW-7842-2075-5515 | My Nintendo: HobbitGamr | Nintendo Network ID: HobbitGamr

NEStalgia

@HobbitGamer That does sound great. That's technically more rural than it ever was here, but closer to what it was 30 years ago than not. We do have in the denser area an old school town (the town is 200 years old) that has the restaurants, but we're talking up-scale avante garde restaurants and wine bars and such. $25-50 a plate type places. I think there is a farmers market that sets up around there out of a semi in a parking lot. There's a real farm market still in the area...but....of course expensive/upscale pricing (farm is premium, not normal, so you pay much more for food from a farm than waxed stuff in a refrigerator from Chile as a luxury item.) And of course it's permanent gridlock getting there.

4 miles from a Walmart. I never, ever, ever thought I'd say that, but that sounds lovely. I hate Walmart...but in the absence of anything else, I'll take it. My Walmart kind of got screwed. It was far enough already at about 20 minutes out (in the good old days) but then they built Yuppieville on TOP of it, so Walmart is crowded in by office and apartment high-rises, perpetually gridlocked streets on a (now) 6 lane highway encased by 5 traffic lights just to get around the Walmart's shopping center. So basically, it's a Walmart in the middle of an urban grid surrounded by the nuveau riche that would never (ever) set foot near the stink of a Walmart. I imagine they'd close that one (that's not even that old) as soon as they could build another one somewhere else, but there's really nowhere left in the region to actually build one, and wherever one is is prime real estate (which is the opposite of how Walmart works.) There's a Target a fair way past that, and what WAS the shopping district, and now is, but it's all crowded in now and horrendous to navigate.

On the average trip there you'd spend about 20 minutes on the road, and another 15-30 minutes waiting for traffic lights. Some lights are 4+ minutes for ONE light and you never get through on the first. it can take 15 minutes just to get on and off your own street round trip if you have to wait for 2 lights. Rather than building all the stores in one place they should be mandating they're spread out so they're locally accessible at any location.

I have a supermarket that in the winter when the leaves are down I can actually SEE it from my driveway. It takes 8-12 minutes to get there. So 16-24 minutes round trip. To get to the end of the street to a building I can see. Most of that waiting at the two traffic lights between. I'd probably be able to walk there faster however even to walk there.....you have to wait for the traffic lights for the crossing.........

NEStalgia

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX BTW, one thing you touched on yesterday was the multi-generational businesses there. That in many ways is the key thing that broke here. Many of the best places that closed (before all the big chains started closing stores too) were family business that when the kids inherited it, they didn't want it. Not even small things. Local chains of pretty big stores (full department stores, big box stores, etc), the kids got it and the first thing they did was sell it for the money. Smaller family things, the kids don't care about the mickey mouse family business, they wan to get an MBA and work for some big multi-national. So the family business exists just long enough to put the kids through college, and then the parents retire and close it. Be it a farm, (if it had land it becomes luxury condos/apartments), or a small services or food/bakery/etc store, and that either becomes a chain or gets flattened and becomes an office/medical. There's no interest in family business and multi-generations taking over now. It's just a tool to get to a corporate job.

NEStalgia

ThanosReXXX

@NEStalgia Well, I think that quite a few of us could ask ourselves the question if there REALLY is something that keeps us anywhere specific. Mostly it's just perceived value, pride or comfort, whereas in a situation such as yours, it kinda sounds like you always led a happy life on a farm or completely secluded and peaceful area, but now the government has decided to modernize the neighborhood, and seeing as you ain't moving out, they've simply decided to build the roundabout around your house, including all the high rises that go with it...

At the very least, I'd move state, to somewhere more rural or whatever. @bimmy-lee's town sounds nice, so you might like it there.

As for the whole "for the masses" thing, I've sort of reconsidered some of my earlier statements, and perhaps my usage of Joe Average wasn't exactly appropriate. What it is, more than anything, is the Dutch hanging on to traditions, and old-school practices, and very strongly at that. Like the ultimate form of "if it ain't broke... "

And over the ages, they've found ways to provide almost everyone with these specific products and services for affordable prices, either by simplifying the process, or by limiting the variety. The ice cream salon, for example, while they do offer several types of pastries and pies, and luxury chocolates, the ice cream only comes in one flavor, and that's vanilla and whipped cream, the latter of which is always sweetened over here, by the way.

So, instead of having dozens of flavors and never knowing exactly which flavor you need to keep the most supplies for, they have always just offered that one single flavor. Of course, that's partially due to the store being so old: back in the 1930's, they didn't have all that many exotic flavors in the first place, or it would simply be some kind of syrup dumped onto or mixed into the base vanilla ice cream. And sprinkles of course, but other than that, it was all relatively simple, especially compared to modern day ice cream salons.

Either way, the principle behind it all is that most if not all people should at least be able to relatively easily afford themselves these products with the quality and taste from their grandparents' time. We obviously also have all that cheap budget trash over here in the supermarkets, like ready made cones in all kinds of flavors, ice cream sandwiches with soggy cake, and what ever else is imaginable, but the hand-made stuff is just meant as a middle of the road solution: good quality products for an affordable price.

Oh, and trust me: Amsterdam is as anti-Europe as you could possibly imagine. There's actually quite a few yanks living and working over here...

P.S.

$150 - $200 for a hair cut? I know you were exaggerating, but even so, the real price must also be quite steep, if you take it to that level. Over here, I get a hair cut for around €20 ($21-$22). Women usually pay more, due to all the extra procedures/treatments they often need and/or want.

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX That's the thing. It wasn't TRULY rural ever in my time. It was a nice hybrid of some rural stuff and suburbia, leaning more toward the suburbia. The rural stuff mostly all went away long ago. I certainly didn't live on a farm (though I'd have loved that), there was a farm in walking (more or less) distance, but that become more houses back 20+ years ago. "Modernizing" is a different thing that gutting everything and replacing it with an entirely different way of life for an entirely different price point for an entirely different group of people from an entirely different place (so they can escape the high costs, taxes, and eventual relating high crime rate from the prior cesspool they created in the same manner.) That's criminal. You expect over many years things change over time - that's always been. But this is a new thing to suddenly all at once just transform an area into as dense an urbania as you can before anyone can notice and stop it, fueled largely by out of state and national corporate land developers and big big money and very corrupt local politicians (that could be a text wall on it's own. Intrigue, carpet baggers, worse... )

And I thought the whole point of democratic selection was that people can choose how they live rather than the government deciding for them how they live? Why not just move to Beijing if we're doing the latter? This is "the government decided to make some cash with rapid backroom deals with big developers in an area they're carpet bagging for a few years while doing it fast so it flies under the noses of the current population and making rapid secret votes to overturn existing zoning and ordinances that the public did support." The idea that whoever has money to turn it into whatever they want can flies against the need for having government at all. Why elect officials if they're just a rubber stamp to whoever has the biggest pile of money? Just make it a free for all. And make ammo cheap.

And when they do inform everyone, they sell it by telling people "it'll make your property value go up!" Which is only valuable to people planning on leaving to begin with. It makes it worse for people planning on staying as your taxes rise every year accordingly. And it's not just residential. This is the very thing that devastates the business culture...which is calculated, as if you force out those smaller (and even bigger businesses) they'll sell the land for even more development.

It's not purely a local problem. NYC has the same problem. Not exactly a farmer living in seclusion, it's turning into a wasteland. Everything that made NYC NYC is fairly rapidly being replaced with vast empty landscape. No stores, only expensive things, only chains....and then that becomes crime. The price of real estate forced out all those little trinket shops, Jewish delis, coffee shops, that everyone thinks of when they think of NYC. Then all the chains moved in - only they could afford the sky high rent. Then they evaluated their bottom lines and realized there's no point losing money on those locations - even for them, the rent costs more than the profits. So most of the former NYC retail space is vacant forever, much of it held by foreign land investors that have no intention of actually using it. Its just a bank they intend to sell at a profit as the price inevitably rises forever.

We have a real estate, and commercial real estate crisis nobody talks about. And it's the prime thing crushing the business climate. It's why all our malls are vacant and being demolished while malls thrive in the rest of the world. And then it's the big thing that leads to the over-densification of an area. Retailers can't generate enough profit to cover the rent, but a bunch of yuppies willing to spend big bux on a swanky pad can. Real estate as an investment market is a BIG crisis - and I guarantee you it's going to become the hot button political topic at some point. Not in the next few years....it hasn't crushed enough people yet. But it will.

As for what binds you somewhere, sure history, employment, family, and of course cost - moving ain't cheap. Moving all your stuff ain't cheap. And in an area like this, to simply move you'd have to spend a LOT to turn the home into something luxury to make it saleable in that real estate investment market, or your best bet is selling for cash for pennies on the dollar to a flipper. Either way you lose money. The whole point of home ownership was basically sinking all your money into it and building your life around it. It's just a different life than renting where you can easily pick up and move. rjejr and I talked about that a while back. He wouldn't do it again. And I can't imagine the cash values in his area....

"If it ain't broke..." is the ONLY method I accept. Everything else is spoiled kids that haven't learned what happens when you break it yet But yeah, I think I'd have a lot in common with them holding onto those traditions like that. Those are the kinds of places that I'd absolutely love (only here, every time I go I keep one eye open hoping they're still there....)

As for the hair cuts, unfortunately, I'm not exaggerating. Remember back in the early 90's after Bill Clinton took office and there was that media "scandal" over Hillary's $200 haircut & color? Well add 25+ years of inflation to that and make it more "mainstream" not just for mega millionaire politicians (that were formerly on the board of Walmart....) but for more "common" folk making $150k+ .....in an area with more lawyers than cashiers....yep....a swank place like that? $150-200 for a women's cut, and well past that for cut + color is not uncommon. Sure there's, for now, Hair Cuttery & Great Clips chains...Hair Cuttery (and the Regis parent company) are in a death spiral though. There's normal people places here and there so far. But less than there were, and a lot more of the exclusive places than anywhere should have. I don't mind that they exist. But every time a "normal people" place closes, it's replaced by something like that. I wasn't exaggerating bout the $800 handbags either.

While I'm sure it's worldwide, I think it's more acute in the US now of stratification. The big difference is 40 years ago the rich and the average didn't really live drastically different lives. They could co-exsist. But after big gains on the stock market for years, the investor class has jumped into a whole different way of life with different norms, standards, and luxuries much more like feudal Europe....nobles and peasants are entirely different civilizations with almost nothing in common. You can ignore it if the nobles don't decide to take over your entire county. But if they do.... they aren't your neighbors, they're your enemies and you will never co-exist, your needs and wants are directly in opposition to each other, and every time they get what they want, you loathe them even more. I now understand how the French Revolution happened, and how giddy everyone was to finally "take it back" in the most vengeful fashion possible. Something tells me the Dutch probably don't, in the present age, take as kindly to such excessive decadence either.....they're not the French

And as I said, I'm just fine and dandy if they want to turn it into a city. Just as soon as they start boring the subway tunnels and building the trolley rails. Have at it. Without that it's not a city, it's just a Yuppieville. And without it, it can't sustain trying to be a city, it's just a land investment wet dream to cash in before leaving what, eventually, will inevitably become slum the next recession.

Also, that ice cream shop is near the red light district....interesting detail.

NEStalgia

HobbitGamer

You can get a basic men’s cut for about $9 here.

#TeamPineapple
#MeatAndGreet

Switch Friend Code: SW-7842-2075-5515 | My Nintendo: HobbitGamr | Nintendo Network ID: HobbitGamr

ThanosReXXX

@NEStalgia And THAT is what caught your attention? Tssss... talk about being an uber-tourist...

But I'll include that in the tour, if that is on your bucket list...

And yeah, rural was perhaps a bit of an over-exaggeration. I sometimes still tend to see large areas of the USA as wide open spaces, with massive parks, even in the midst of skyscrapers, but obviously, there's all kinds of townships and cityscapes over there, much like here, except the States has them on a far larger scale. Where I live obviously also isn't rural, or suburbian, because I'm right next to the city's center, but we do have a lot of houses over here with so-called city gardens, so you'd at least have some outdoors part connected to your house. Unless of course you're living on a higher floor, such as I am, in which case you're lucky if you have a decent balcony, which I do...

The bit where I mentioned the roundabout being built around your house, is just an example, not an actual imagining of your specific situation. It actually happened over here, somewhere back in the 80's: a farmer didn't want to move, because the house he lived in, was his parents' house, and it had been in the family for generations, so they LITERALLY built the freeway around his house, separating his farmhouse from his lands, but the house is still there, sitting in a small valley, with the road circling all the way around it, at (edit: several feet above) rooftop level.

I'm kinda shocked at those hair cutting prices. I really thought you were embellishing there, simply to emphasize the rising of costs of living and commodities. Those prices would be hair styles for the rich and famous over here, albeit the B-rank famous people...

As for democracy: that only lasts as long as the politician that promises it, nowadays. I do still vividly remember when I was still living with my parents, and we as a neighborhood were allowed to have a say in the matter of there going to be paid parking in our area of the city or not, and we almost unanimously voted against, so the local district council had no other choice than to keep parking free, but a couple of years later, the new heads of the council decided that it had to be pushed through anyway, regardless of the fact that we had done our bid to stop it a couple of years prior.

So, ultimately, we got paid parking all over the city, and I'm now living in the second most expensive neighborhood in that regard. That's also one of the main reasons why I don't have a car. And I don't even miss it, because I can reach most places that I need to go to on foot, with a bike or by taking a short trip on public transport.

I guess that when you're living in a more populated area, it's always going to be give and take, but as long as the two are in a relative balance, which it is over here, then I'm okay with it. Once they start pestering me with more rules and regulations, and buildings to block my view, then I'll probably move out.

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

Link-Hero

Over $150 haircuts? What salon do you go to for such absurd prices? Even the fancier salons around here only charge 20-30 bucks at most for basic cuts.

Link-Hero

Nintendo Network ID: LinkHero25

NEStalgia

@ThanosReXXX Haha, no it's not actually on my bucket list, and I'm not actually interested in the tour of it....but it still was amusing, especially coming from Mr. ReXXX

Technically I'm not - at all- a city person. Never really liked cities, though never terribly uncomfortable in them (in the daylight, in the right locations......the actual city that's nearest here has some areas that make the third world war zones look quite charming.)

BUT I can at least accept the conveniences a city offers and learn to like that. In that sense real cities have a lot more in common with true rural than does this weird new "urbanized suburban mix" that has all the crowding, noise, congestion, and problems of cities, with none of the conveniences, while mixing it with all the distances, and lack of conveniences of rural. Imagine the spread of farm country with the density, roads , and traffic lights of a city and none of the transportation and local proximity to anything. Not really what you think of with "suburbs". But that's what passes for it now.

That's actually a cool story about the farmer, in that here, they just would have sent government agents in with guns to drag him out under imminent domain then flattened the house. Not joking. That's actually what would happen if they declare they want your house and you resist. Like China, but with less healthy food.

Well, everyone's their own YouTube celebrity, does that count? But yeah, that's real pricing. Even "average" people in one of those "cheap" chains I mentioned. For women's hair and color you're not getting out on less than $60 + tip. And that's if you accept the cheap "newbie on the job" person. The experienced tier would be $80+. So yeah, the rich, $200+ for women's cut and color at a fancy shop is on the low side. Mens hair is of course cheaper even there....but I don't actually speak with any urban cowboys that would actually go there in my circles....

Good to see "democracy" means "autocracy" unanimously. Maybe we really should all consolidate under China. It's really the same government either way, but much more efficient and cheaper that way. We apparently don't actually have a different government system, anywhere, just a more fun illusion of one.

There's no give and take, usually just give and give and give. But of course the very problem you described with the parking meters is the problem: If they can force whatever they want on anyone and there's no actual say, why even bother with pretending there's representation? At least that's an actual city to begin with so you expect that city problem. When you start with suburbia and then city land developers come in and decide they want to build a city there, if we don't have actual government representation controlling it to represent the will of the people, then we're back to force being the only solution to any problem, which is what governments were intended to prevent. In the case of my area, there's been active corruption for decades by local leaders that had their own vision for what they wanted to do....and many of them were only using it as a stepping stone to move onto higher offices and corporate jobs. The people didn't matter, it's about their accomplishments and partnerships only. There should be public hangings for such things. We should have permanent gallows at every government building - reserved for public officials that betray public trust. Watching your predecessor being picked at by the crows out your window should remind you to keep to your campaign promises very very closely.

NEStalgia

NEStalgia

@Link-Hero Got to look your best before you drive the Tesla to the local Whole Foods!

NEStalgia

ThanosReXXX

@NEStalgia "..but it still was amusing, especially coming from Mr. ReXXX"

Well, it didn't come from me, because you mentioned it first. I only showed you a page about the ice cream salon.

But having said that, it actually kinda is what the triple X in my name stands for. Not that I'm particularly interested in "public ladies", but I do like my adult entertainment every now and then, and I'm not ashamed to admit it. Funny thing is, that part of that interest was actually sparked, or rather: re-sparked by my ex. But that's all I'm gonna say about that specific topic...

As for why giving people a vote or say in things and then sneakily changing it back around a couple of years after: isn't it obvious? To appease the masses. First give them the idea of control, instead of never letting them have any at all, which would have resulted in torches and pitchforks, and now you've tranquilized them for a couple of years, and most people will now only complain, b**** and moan, but practically none of them will jump onto the barricades for a second time, so they can ultimately have their way with less antagonism than when they would have implemented it straight away.

As for the farmer living in the center of a roundabout: it's his land, so unless the government buys him out, he doesn't have to leave, under Dutch law, so the various involved agencies had to literally find a way around this "problem". But there's examples of that in other countries too.

Here's an example from China:

Description underneath the video:

A couple from China are refusing to leave their half-demolished house, which has since had a motorway built around it. . Report by Sophie Foster.

And here's a whole list of "stubborn property owners" from all over the world:

I'm half-expecting you to be in the 2022 version of that particular video...

I also like this one, although this particular one is planned, and the residents are more than okay with it:

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

bimmy-lee

Hey everyone, it’s been a super busy few days. I need to get caught up, but hope everyone is well. My daughter lost her first baby tooth today, and it’s been surprisingly difficult to come to terms with this. Seems like she just got those crooked little Chiclets. If anyone needs me, I’ll be hiding in the closet with liquor, taking pulls straight off the bottle while crying. I’ll try to get caught up here in between sobs.

limby-bee was a jerk.

My Nintendo: RedNestor

Anti-Matter

HobbitGamer wrote:

You can get a basic men’s cut for about $9 here.

Here in Indonesia you can get Rp 25,000 or US$ 1.80 for basic men's cut like my hair. 😉

My Top 6 games :
1. Dance Dance Revolution series (100)
2. Dragon Quest Builders 2 PS4/Switch (95)
3. The Sims 4 PS4 + All contents (93)
4. Portal Knights PS4 (90)
5. Final Fantasy VIII PS1 (90)
6. Animal Crossing New Leaf: Welcome Amiibo 3DS (89)

Switch Friend Code: SW-8364-7166-5608 | 3DS Friend Code: 2638-4872-0879 | Nintendo Network ID: TAGunderground

ThanosReXXX

@bimmy-lee Ah... baby teeth replacement. We've all been there, except in some countries, the tooth fairy was extremely stingy, if not non-existent altogether...

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

bimmy-lee

@ThanosReXXX - Haha, I got a quarter for the first few when I pretended to believe in the tooth fairy. The next few got me a candy bar, and then that was that. Maybe a slap on the back and an “Atta boy”. I’m sure she’ll get a whole dollar to account for inflation. I can tell she’s only pretending to believe in the tooth fairy to reap the rewards. She started asking hard hitting, highly suspicious questions about Santa last year that made me feel like I was being grilled in court.

limby-bee was a jerk.

My Nintendo: RedNestor

ThanosReXXX

@bimmy-lee Nowadays, you're supposed to tie a wire to the tooth and to a drone, make a funny video about it, and then put it on YouTooth, erm... YouTube.

Couple more years and kids are going to be WAY too savvy for us, and then they'll be expecting to wake up and find a tablet under their pillow with their own private bitcoin account...

On a side note: ooh, the 20 questions on Santa, aye? Glad I'm not in your shoes, buddy....

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

Top

Please login or sign up to reply to this topic