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Topic: Games You Recently Beat?

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Xyphon22

Finished up 2064: Read only Memories. It was a lot more visual novel and less point-and-click adventure than I thought it was going to be, but it was pretty good. Not sure about the twist ending. I don't think it had much of an impact because the character involved wasn't too important up to that point so the awe factor wasn't what it could have been.

Xyphon22

3DS Friend Code: 5069-3937-8083

Ralizah

@JoeDiddley Well, definitely get to those first, then. VLR, DRV3, and the first and third AA games are some of my all-time favorite experiences. I kinda envy you: I wish I could experience them for the first time again.

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

JoeDiddley

@Ralizah you’ve got me excited!

I know what you mean feeling that way.

Edited on by JoeDiddley

Switch: SW-2923-8106-2126
PSN: joediddley

Tyranexx

@WoomyNNYes The blast wave sequence was fun!...and very punishing. There were some unique solutions to make it through that area.

Currently playing: The Wonderful 101: Remastered (Switch)

Switch Friend Code: SW-3478-2466-4791 | Nintendo Network ID: Zelda_By_Night

Magician

Pac-Man Championship Edition Demake

Exclusive to the recently released Namcot Collection / Namco Museum Archive Vol 1. I'm not sure if a game that only has a score attack qualifies as a game that can be beaten? But just playing a round is short, sweet, and exhilarating. Of course you get ten other NES games with the collection, but those take a backseat to this glorious version of Pac-Man.

Switch Physical Collection - 639 games (as of August 5th, 2020)
Currently playing: Coffee Talk (Switch)
Favorite Quote: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -Arthur C. Clarke

Adnanilyas21

I just finished Dragon Quest XI S: Echoes of an Elusive Age - Definite Edition.

Next is Pokemon Sword Expansion

Adnanilyas21

DenDen

I finished paper Mario origami king for 100% took me around 55+ hours.
Game is great.

Now playing
Switch : Animal Crossing new Horizon.
Streets of rage 4
Trials of mana
FC - SW 2926-4689-1966

Switch Friend Code: Sw-2926-4689-1966 | My Nintendo: DenDen

WoomyNNYes

@Losermagnet Regarding A Hat in Time, do I need to complete the Time Rift challenges to advance & complete the game? One of these rift challenges where you have to traverse all the floating white blocks with the parade band following, was pretty rough, couldnt tell where to go many times.😠😢😭😥

Edited on by WoomyNNYes

Science liker
Extreme bicycle rider
(Nobody says "extreme". I said it to be silly.)

ACNH game progress cannot be transferred to another console
https://en-americas-support.nintendo.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/48899/kw/animal%20crossing%20save%20data

Blooper987

I just finished DKC 2

Finishing up Color splash now before I get origami king

Blooper987

Switch Friend Code: SW-0772-1845-0995

Tyranexx

Yo-Kai Watch 2: Fleshy Souls (3DS)

This one is an interesting, albeit gimmicky monster-catching RPG series from Level-5 that was quite popular in Japan for some time; the concept is based off of Japan's yokai folklore. Yo-Kai in this universe are spirits/beings responsible for life's daily problems and other occurrences. True to the Pokemon approach, this game has a twin (Bony Spirits) and an enhanced "third" version that compliments them both (Psychic Specters). There are certainly some improvements from the first game, but not quite enough to call this version "#2" IMO.

While each series has its own identity, there will be a couple of Pokemon comparisons here.

Positives

  • As with many Level-5 games, the presentation here is vibrant and colorful. Rooms, buildings, and other locations are for the most part unique and have had a ton of detail put into them. The 3D effect, while not essential, is definitely put to good use. I highly recommend using it if possible!
  • Some areas are recycled (understandable as this is the same town as the first game), but there are plenty of new ones too.
  • The plot this time around is less episodic than the first entry for the most part; there is an overarching narrative. It doesn't stray too far from the stereotypical "bad stuff happens, save the world!" concept, but some of the plot details are certainly intriguing. This is all counterbalanced by some odd, silly moments.
  • Much of the writing is entertaining, and many characterizations (such as with your self-proclaimed companion/Yo-Kai butler, Whisper) are more in line with the anime this time around. The game also exhibits some rare self-awareness and tests the fourth wall. Don't go in expecting something TOO serious.
  • To go along with the above, many of the side quests also have some interesting, silly, and/or unique story lines that make many of them worth seeking out.
  • Much of the music is recycled from the previous game and the anime, but this also makes many of the soundtracks recognizable and enjoyable. Some of the boss music (particularly for the final battle) is catchy IMO.
  • There are over 400 Yo-Kai (though some are palette swaps with different names) and a lot of bugs, fish, and items to collect; completionists will have a field day.
  • There are a ton of other extras outside of the main game, such as locating Baffle Boards (riddles where you guess/input the name of a Yo-Kai, then summon the correct one when you recruit it to that location), Gates of Whimsy (odd, random doors that can be found in the overworld with different functions, though most are battle rooms) from which you obtain Gate Globes, and a mode (with the Version 2.0 update) that makes the original Yo-Kai Watch: Blasters game playable. Just to name a few.
  • As with the first Yo-Kai Watch, there's a good chunk of post-game content. Such as reaching S Rank with the Yo-Kai Watch and discovering/visiting the Infinite Inferno.

Neutral

  • I didn't mind the battle system the first time around, but it's almost TOO random. What a Yo-Kai does in battle is completely by will, outside of setting their target (if multiple enemy Yo-Kai are on the field), moving the wheel on the touch screen to rotate three Yo-Kai in at a time (up to six Yo-Kai can be set on the wheel) and their Soultimate attacks; the latter are activated by playing a mini-game of sorts using the touch screen. The stylus is best for this, but many of these moves can be pulled off with buttons as well. In normal fights, the clunky battle system isn't much, but it does shine somewhat in boss fights; this is where the true strategy lies. You can manipulate the natures of Yo-Kai using items (such as giving a Yo-kai a Tender nature to make them more likely to heal party members), but these also aren't 100% foolproof.
  • Yo-Kai recruitment isn't quite as finicky in this game, but it's still pretty random at times. The player can increase their chances by feeding an enemy Yo-Kai their favorite food and by having certain Yo-Kai in their party to bolster their odds, but this is still very RNG reliant. I spent well over an hour trying to recruit one Yo-Kai to finish a side quest and had no problems getting a few others without trying.
  • I'm...not sure what to think about riding the train. It's a novelty to ride the train in real-time (game-wise) the first time around, but after that it gets old and boring fast. This becomes much less of an issue after fast travel is unlocked.
  • The game's difficulty is a bit on the easy side...up until the final boss sequences. Then there's a significant difficulty spike. I get this is a game aimed at kids, but if so...shouldn't this progression have been more gradual?

Negatives/Nitpicks

  • The big one for me: I get it, some aspects of Japanese culture need to be localized for audiences who may not fully understand some concepts. To an extent, I'm not against localization. But it's extremely hard, with the game's setting, to sell the fact that "Springdale" is set in America. Between shrines, the abundance of Japanese foods such as rice balls and mochi, the styles of some buildings, and the use of a "$1" coin for a gashapon machine/Crank-A-Kai (Such coins do exist in the USA, but they aren't commonly used) in the opening act, there HAD to be a better way of handling this.
  • While I enjoyed many of the side quests, it was a mild annoyance to have to do a certain amount of plot-related ones (usually related, but not always) before the story could advance.
  • Actually locating a Yo-Kai, once its general location is pinpointed, is an annoying pain sometimes.

Overall, I recommend this game to series fans, collect-a-thon lovers, or to anyone who's looking for a unique, monster catching RPG that isn't Pokemon. I'd argue that its story and amount of side content blasts more recent Pokemon entries out of the water. Odd difficulty spike near the end aside, the game is relatively easy, and the battle system isn't for everyone. There is a ton of meat to this game, and much of it (outside of introductory quests earlier on) is fully optional. I've logged about 45 hours on my save file and do plan on doing a bit of the post-game content and cleaning up some loose ends.

Currently playing: The Wonderful 101: Remastered (Switch)

Switch Friend Code: SW-3478-2466-4791 | Nintendo Network ID: Zelda_By_Night

Losermagnet

@WoomyNNYes I'm pretty sure they weren't required. I believe they were extra time pieces and had no bearing on the story chapters. However, the pink time rifts have the story book pages, which will provide a little insight on the characters. They aren't required either, it's really up to you if you want to collect those.

That mission you referenced is a pain. Dead Bird Studios was my favorite section, EXCEPT THAT PART. Having to restart the whole thing after failing was so frustrating.

Switch friend code: SW-2223-7827-8798
Give me a heads-up if you're going to send a request please.

WoomyNNYes

@Losermagnet Those secret-agent-looking crows in trench coats on the train, always asking personal questions, "oohhh ohhhh MMMmmmm!", were hilarious Kind if amazing. I think that was the same world? Maybe it wasn't. Either way, yeah, the studios world would was good.

That, and that creepy house where the ghost lurks, and chases you, was great.

Edited on by WoomyNNYes

Science liker
Extreme bicycle rider
(Nobody says "extreme". I said it to be silly.)

ACNH game progress cannot be transferred to another console
https://en-americas-support.nintendo.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/48899/kw/animal%20crossing%20save%20data

Losermagnet

@WoomyNNYes The crows were my favorite, I loved that voice acting. I kinda ruined the creepy house bit for myself. I knew through reviews and youtube there was a legitimately scary bit, but I didn't know exactly what it was. So naturally I played that part late at night. Still scared me.

Things like that are the reason I think the game is so fun. It's got some problems, but there's some great creativity too.

Switch friend code: SW-2223-7827-8798
Give me a heads-up if you're going to send a request please.

RR529

Shantae & the Seven Sirens (Switch), the latest entry in the cult series.
Untitled
Ret-To-Go!

Gameplay

  • It's a pretty standard side scrolling "Metroidvania" action/platformer, though it has a touch of classic Zelda as well (you obtain most of your required upgrades while exploring themed dungeons where you ultimately use your new ability to reach & defeat it's boss).
  • In addition to the ability upgrades you get by working through the game's dungeons, you can upgrade your health by collecting Heart Squids scattered around the world (each dungeon has three, and there's a bunch in the overworld too), augment your abilities by obtaining equippable stat altering Monster Cards (most are dropped by enemies, but the most powerful ones based on the game's bosses can only be obtained by trading Golden Nuggets, another of the game's collectables, for them in Towns), and by buying permanent upgrades in Town Shops, such as increased attack power & speed, and even a shield that invokes total invincibility (these are optional upgrades, and you can turn them on & off in the menu, if you decide you don't want to use them).
  • In addition to your various upgrades, you can buy consumable health & magic regenerating potions and weapons (such as fireballs or boomerangs) in Town Shops, and enemies regularly drop health regenerating food items as well. Along with the various upgrades mentioned before (one of which is an ability that lets you heal yourself with magic), it is entirely possible to be completely OP by at least the half way point if you so choose, as you have so many options to heal & reduce damage.

Audio/Visual

  • It's by no means a technical marvel, but it has a pleasingly crisp bright & happy look and for the most part runs smoothly (there are one or two spots with a lot going on where it can briefly slow down), and there are some unique biomes in the overworld that buck cliche trends, such as a laboratory and even a small area themed around an Otaku/Nerd's hideout, pictured below.
    Untitled
  • Of particular note are the high quality (although generally short, given it's budget) anime style cutscenes, such as the one pictured below before a boss fight.
    Untitled
  • I'd say it's soundtrack fits the game, but as I've mentioned before I'm not someone who gets really fussed over music in a game.

Story

  • The story itself isn't anything particularly noteworthy, though there was no indication that the underground city was really a ship, so it does have it's twists, but where it shines is in it's self awareness. It knows you're here to have a fun time so it revels in the silliness of the female characters wearing almost nothing for armor, and other punny moments, such as the one pictured below where you're tasked with collecting the "Dagron Balls".
    Untitled
  • Characters are generally fun, if not very deep (I will say I look forward to each game's Squid Baron moments).

Overall

  • It's not the deepest game around, but it's nice comfort food and is just a game to smile along to.
    Untitled
    Time to celebrate!

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

Magician

I was in the mood for some 2D fighter action this morning.

Samurai Showdown 2019 - Gorgeous, sounds great, but the all-or-nothing gameplay may or may not be your bag. 8/10

Ultra Street Fighter II - All the redrawn character sprites makes this the most aesthetically beautiful iteration of classic SFII. But the jazz influenced remix of the music? Not so great. 8/10

Guilty Gear XX Accent Core R - It's a PS2 sprite based game, so it hasn't aged well graphically. But that metal soundtrack is the bees-knees. The composition by Daisuke Ishiwatari and Koichi Seiyama make this game worth your time. 7/10

ACA Neo Geo Garou: Mark of the Wolves - The zenith of the sprite based SNK fighting games. The tightest gameplay among all the fighters I played today. The audio is neither here nor there and the character roster is on the shallow side. 8/10

Blade Stranges - A fighter with a roster of characters revolving around Nicalis published games. It looks pretty good and it plays well. It just has zero nostalgia. Unless you're both a 2D fighter fan while also being a Nicalis super-fan. 7/10

All in all, a morning well spent.

Switch Physical Collection - 639 games (as of August 5th, 2020)
Currently playing: Coffee Talk (Switch)
Favorite Quote: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -Arthur C. Clarke

Glitchling78

I Am Setsuna

Completion: Main Story with a few extras
Time: 25-30 hours
Genre: Turn-based RPG in vein of Squaresoft SNES titles.

World
SNOW. LOTS OF SNOW. I get that’s this game’s visual style but, my god, snow gets boring after a while. There is brief respite from snow every now and again when you venture indoors but these are always also lacking in colour too.
I don’t think this should’ve gone the Pokémon route of forcing in unfitting locations like a random desert but I do feel they could have given more variation without breaking the melancholic vibe. You do go to locations like caves and watery areas but they’re still mostly white and blue.
Later on you gain access to the travel the whole world, except there’s no map, the towns often share the same models and everywhere looks snowy/mountainous. It’s incredibly easily to get lost at that point.
That all said, the actual areas you visit are pretty and quite a bit of detail looks hand painted.

Characters
Your main party all have good motivations to be with you (except the last one) and all have great side plots. I feel the only character who drops off is Nidr who starts great but quickly devolves into just voicing what your mostly silent protagonist wants to say.
My main issue with this cast is how dry most of them are. There is no humour until you meet your fifth character. The plot and setting is meant to miserable but it can get quite oppressive without a little light relief along the way.
Luckily the characters do work well together and are believably written. I ended up quite fond of a few of them.
Normally I really dislike silent protagonists, but it felt like less of an issue here because you had a lot of moments with dialogue options so he never felt truly silent. I would have preferred he have his own personality but that might be just me.

Plot
As I say, very dreary. You can tell this plot was inspired by Final Fantasy as there are many similarities, especially with FFX.
I found it good overall, nothing mind-blowing but it works well. The end section (basically everything from the final save point) had perhaps a bit too much going on. It felt like too many twists were crammed into a short timeframe, but they were straightforward and clear enough that it wasn’t confusing.

Gameplay
The game has a similar tutorial issue to Xenoblade Chronicles 2, where it throws a bunch of walls of text at you with a lot of nouns you already know but now are capitalised and mean something different.
An easy one to get is a Talisman, which equates to an accessory which will give you boosts. These are boosts to things like Fluxes, Momentums and Singularities.
A Flux I never properly understood but it kept happening after battle.
A Momentum is a timed button press during an attack to add something good to the attack.
I think a Singularity was a randomly occurring state of battle which offered buffs but they often weren’t particularly helpful.
During the tutorials this was kind of confusing, I really think a practical demonstration would have helped. I did get the hang of it over time, and the game is forgiving enough to let you get by without fully getting it.
The battles themselves play similarly to Chrono Trigger in that it’s an ATB system where the layout of your characters and the enemies affects the battles. Also, like Chrono Trigger you can perform combo abilities where if 2 or 3 characters are ready to go they might be able to pull off special moves together.
I may have been missing something but I couldn’t find a way to read enemy’s elemental weaknesses. This was quite an issue as basically almost all enemies look snowy, so it would be easy to assume everything’s weak to fire. In the end I just threw together a party of physical attackers and ignored weaknesses.
I did find however that some abilities, particularly a couple belonging to the protagonist, vastly outclassed everything else. In the end I felt like my team had two really useful characters and a dud. And by useful I don’t just mean they hit hard as handily status effects, buffs and debuffs are all useful. In fact, most bosses can have status effects and debuffs inflicted on them which was lovely.
I did find the battles quite engaging, especially towards the end. The game was fairly easy and never felt like I had to grind outside of the battles you would find naturally.
The dungeon layouts gets very predictable after a while. It’s probably a good thing you don’t have a map because I fear the layouts would look similar throughout. Basically they are all filled with similarly sized (roughly screen size) open areas with thin paths between. These small open areas typically have monsters roaming which will attack if you get close. This does mean you can avoid them, however it’s best not to as you not only get experience but also loot to sell. This loot is acquired in an interesting way where the nature of the kill (overkill, killed with a momentum attack, killed with an elemental attack etc) offers different loot. Selling this loot not only earns you money, but the specific loot sold allows you you acquire new Spritnite (yay, another random word to learn!) which is essentially Materia from FFVII. This was an interesting mechanic to encourage you to vary how you attack. It was initially overwhelming to have so many different random items but it does funnel them to a different section of your bag so it didn’t lead to a messy inventory.
Most Spritnite is specific to a character, although some are universal. They offer battle commands or passive abilities. This segmenting of characters into more defined roles was very satisfying to me as I love FFIX with its characters having predetermined “job classes.” You do have some agency in which abilities from that class to equip, and agency in which party members you include.

Overall
Consistent dreariness in plot, setting and cast make this game distinct and focused but also relentless in its melancholy.
The battle system is fine, with perhaps too many bells and whistles for a 25-ish hour RPG.
If you like white and blue, this is the game for you.

Glitchling78

AstroTheGamosian

The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures

Completion: Main Story
Time: Dunno. Didn't time myself.
Genre: Fantasy Adventure

Plot: Princess Zelda asks Link to accompany her to the Temple of the Four Sword where evil wind mage Vaati is sealed inside the Four Sword. Shadow Link appears and kidnaps Zelda and convinces Link to draw the Four Sword, thus releasing Vaati. Vaati unleashes havoc across Hyrule, and Link has to put things right and rescue the Six Maidens and Zelda. But it turns out Vaati was only a distraction; the real main villain is, surprise, surprise, Ganon/Ganondorf. After defeating both of them, Hyrule is once again at peace.

Characters: Your standard fare from a Zelda game: Link, Zelda, and Ganon. However, some new races are thrown into the mix, such as the cactus people in the Desert of Doubt.

World: While the art style for the characters borrows from The Wind Waker, by and large, the world is based off of A Link to the Past. Same with the music.

Gameplay: Simple enough to understand: utilize formations to advance through the game. However, as someone who is used to picking up objects with the A button, and not the R button, I would usually get hurt when trying to pick up a bomb.

Collecting Force Gems is a must, as you need to have at least 2000 at the end of each level (there are three in each region of Hyrule) in order to advance to the next one; otherwise, you have to go back to the beginning of the level until you have enough, at which point, you will automatically warp to the end of the level.

While it is easier to die in this game, as you have limited hearts (more must be found during each level), you use Force Fairies to revive you, meaning that if you are careful, Game Over is impossible.

The game has connectivity with the Game Boy Advance, and there will be moments where you have to go into the Game Boy Advance, so to speak, to progress through the game or hide from Big Bombs.

Overall: I've been wanting to play this game for years, as it was one of the few Zelda games I have not yet played, much less beaten. Now that I have, I am glad I did, but that being said, I would say it is one of the weaker entries in the series. We really didn't need Ganon as the main villain again, it mostly feels like it borrowed assets from other Zelda games to fill the gap between The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess, the gameplay took some getting used to, and it felt shorter than the average Zelda game, especially given that it is a console Zelda game, not a handheld one. I would give this game a 7/10.

AstroTheGamosian

Magician

Donut Country

Environmental puzzle game; it's the inverse idea to the Katamari Damacy series. Rather than rolling up gradually larger world objects, in Donut Country you're gradually making larger world objects disappear through a blackhole that you control. The chill-hop soundtrack is pretty dope. Just a quick two-hour blast and done. A pretty terrific experience from start to finish, a "just one more round" kind of game that's hard to put down once you start. 8/10

Switch Physical Collection - 639 games (as of August 5th, 2020)
Currently playing: Coffee Talk (Switch)
Favorite Quote: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -Arthur C. Clarke

Ralizah

DOOM 3: BFG Edition

Platform: PC

Playtime: 15 or so hours

Completion status: Main campaign only so far

DOOM 3 was released in 2004 by id Software for the PC. A reboot of sorts, the game treads similar ground in terms of subject matter to previous DOOM releases, but distinguished itself with its dramatically improved id Tech 4-powered graphics and notable changes to pacing, level design, and overall atmosphere. The version of the game I recently played, however, was the 2012 BFG Edition for PC, a sort of HD remaster of the original that also makes certain controversial changes to the original game. I did previously play the original DOOM 3 when it was still a new and highly advanced PC game, so I also want to briefly compare aspects of the two releases.

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In the first of its many innovations, DOOM 3 (as well as the BFG Edition) is something of a story-driven experience. You, of course, fill in the shoes of the nameless Doomguy, a random space marine who discovers that he's very, very good at killing demons. As with previous games, you're a random nobody, but there's actually a supporting cast of characters you'll kind of come to know over the course of your adventure. Three personalities stand out: Dr. Malcolm Betruger, the primary antagonist of the game, who is corrupted by demonic influences after being transported into hell during one of his teleporter experiments, and who masterminds the invasion of the UAC facility on Mars by the hordes of hell; Thomas Kelly, your commanding officer, who works in tandem with Doomguy to try and curb the demonic invasion; and Counselor Swann, who was sent to investigate the curious goings-on and the UAC base and eventually find himself indirectly butting heads with Sergeant Kelly.

And what curious goings-on there are. Previous games in the series never really give the player a sense of what happened in the build-up to the apocalyptic events that take place, but the same absolutely cannot be said for DOOM 3. In a heavily System Shock 2-inspired change of course (like Bioshock, the entire game feels like it was heavily influenced by the design of that legendary horror-scifi-fps-rpg), DOOM 3 includes a massive amount of narrative and worldbuilding via the use of audio logs found around the base. The scientists and marines locked inside of this base have noticed weird and alarming goings-on leading to the invasion that starts off the game for months, and, lacking any other outlet, they start spilling their guts into their audio diaries. To be honest, I always find the use of audio logs to be a lazy and inorganic method of worldbuilding and storytelling, but the technique wasn't overdone in 2004, and I can buy that people trapped in a stressful environment like this might record their feelings of apprehension over various events happening around them.

But, uh, DOOM games have always been about the gameplay. Fast, fierce games with marines and demons and hell; the series has always had a very METAL identity. And now players were being given a sequel where they were being asked to slow down and appreciate the ambiance. Even as a person who loves story-heavy RPGs, I found myself quickly growing impatient with the countless audio logs where a spooked scientist would ramble about weird behavior among the higher-ups and spooky sounds at night for a minute at a time, and even moreso with the logs where some technician would start discussing some highly technical aspect of the UAC facility's operation. You don't actually have to stop when you're listening to one of the logs, of course, but good luck trying to concentrate on Dr. Spooks-a-Lot whimper about his personal problems with you walk five steps away from the location you retrieved the log and get ambushed by demons. Perhaps this was the intended playstyle. It would explain why the game feels like it almost completely lacks music (even the ambient moans and screeches of DOOM 64). No time for moody or exciting tunes as you're listening to logs, or listening to NPCs talk, or listening to some sort of automated display. There's a LOT of listening in this game.

Which, to be fair, ties into the original design philosophy of this game. DOOM 3, much to the chagrin of long-time fans, has always been more of a slow paced game. I mean, it's still a shooter (you tote around a rocket launcher, for god's sake), but DOOM 3 has always been a game designed to get you to stop, or at least slow down momentarily. Which is where the first conflict with BFG's changes come into play. The original DOOM 3 famously included a flashlight as an item in a separate weapon slot, meaning the player can't illuminate shadows and use a gun at the same time. Players have joked for years about DOOM 3 Doomguy being too stupid to duct-tape his flashlight to the muzzle of a gun, but, in the context of this game, the decision was the correct one. The player could, theoretically, just charge through the entire game with a weapon equipped, but that's a very easy way to run headlong into the waiting claws of an imp. The player had to stop and scope out their surroundings a bit before proceeding, which tapped directly into the pacing and tone of the game.

Untitled

In DOOM 3: BFG Edition, the player has a flashlight mounted on their armor, which can be activated independently of anything else they're doing. Meaning they can simultaneously see in the dark AND use their weapon. I imagine this change in the 2012 remaster was made after years of loud fan complaints about this design choice. But I want to reveal an open secret of sorts, here and now, to anyone listening. An inconvenient truth.

The loudest voices on the internet are usually the ones not worth listening to.

Look, I get the frustration with a DOOM game being a slow-paced horror affair, but, for better or worse, that was the direction the game took, and any QoL changes that conflict with the core design philosophy are not necessarily going to lead to a better game. DOOM 3 was clearly designed around the limitation of not being able to see clearly in the dark environments, and strapping a flashlight to your shoulder kind of ruins certain setpieces in this game as well. For example, in one section, you're in this lab, and some sort of conveyor device is dragging a luminescent tube through an expanse of darkness. The intention of this segment is clear: you're supposed to stick by it and shoot at the enemies who pop out at you from the surrounding darkness when they become illuminated. But the omnipresent flashlight makes this segment pointless. You can just barrel through this location with your flashlight turned on, quickly dispatching the enemies waiting to jump out at you before they know what hit them.

The changes to ammo availability also somewhat goes against the design philosophy of the original. In the original, you actually had to scrounge around to find enough ammo to feel comfortable creeping further into the UAC base's winding corridors. Hunting around dingy rooms for scraps of ammo to use against monsters is a time-tested horror game tradition. For whatever reason, though, the game likes to utterly overload the player with ammo. And not even just shotgun ammo. I was never out of heavy arms, and never felt any particular reason to conserve my ammo and actually, I dunno, fall back on my handgun or other smaller weapons, because the game stuffs its environments with so many high-level goodies. Scarcity confers value on resources and also incentivizes certain types of behaviors. I was always loaded to the teeth, so the only incentive I had to poke around most of the time was to find audio logs where someone would whine for five minutes about their personal problems with the chain of command. That is to say, no such incentives existed.

Which isn't, of course, to say that the game's horror trappings are always effective. DOOM 3's reliance on generic spooky locations, monster reinforcements that often pop up out of the shadows, random jump scares like demonic cackling that will issue when you enter a room, and hammy intercom taunting from Dr. Betruger throughout the game (the dude actually says "Your soul will be mine!" at one point during the game, like Shang Tsung from the Mortal Kombat movie, lmao) gives the game something of a haunted house flair to it. Not like an actual haunted house, mind you, but rather, like one of those places where you pay to walk around so that people dressed up like zombies or mad scientists can jump out at you and try to scare you. This impression is strengthened as you bear witness to plot events throughout, but always from a safe distance, like in a separate room where you're separated by a pane of glass.

(Dr. Betruger in another life, probably)

Speaking of ammo, I just want to say that I don't like whoever decided it was a good idea to rob me of all my carefully cultivated BFG rounds near the end of the game and make me start from scratch (for plot reasons). The ammo balancing leads to me building up a healthy collection of arms, of course, but those unused BFG rounds still haunt me.

DOOM 3's weapons game is pretty strong, although not revolutionary. Nearly all of the old weapons return here sans the super shotgun (the normal one in DOOM 3 feels sort of... piddly... I didn't use it much). There are two new additions, though: a machine gun, which is really effective against smaller enemies when you don't need the power of the chaingun, and grenades, which... honestly, only got used when there was a long hallway and something slow coming toward me, because these do splash damage, and a LOT of enemies in this game like to aggressively charge the player. For immediate long-range devastation, a rocket launcher was always preferable, and for anything closer, chainguns and beam rifles are just safer.

I'm not sure what it is, but I will say that a lot of the weapons don't have the visceral punch they did in some of the previous games. The chaingun, especially, feels less impactful compared to the one in DOOM 64.

With that said, the last weapon you get in this game, the Soul Cube, is pretty fun. Every five kills or so, you can use this supernatural cube...thing to instantly kill nearly any enemy in the game. It works quite well when you gun down a bunch of smaller enemies on the way to something particular large and annoying, and then take it down with your Rubiks-Cube-of-Death. It even replenishes your HP!

The level design in DOOM 3 can feel a bit claustrophobic throughout (there's a distinct lack of wide-open arenas to run around like in previous DOOM games, opting instead for cramped hallways and rooms loaded with boxes and industrial equipment. This fit, perhaps, with the slower, more horror-based pacing and tone of the original, although it gives it a different flavor than traditional DOOM. The levels start off almost painfully linear, although the maps do eventually increase in complexity and require some backtracking. This is perhaps a good thing, given the frustrating lack of maps (!) in this game. I rarely got lost, though, and backtracking is typically fairly limited and streamlined compared to what you might find in other games (or, indeed, other DOOM games)

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One of the strongest aspects of DOOM 3 is the enemy variety. Almost all of the classic enemies return, often in reimagined form, in addition to a host of new additions.

There are zombies in this game now. A lot of them. Like, classic Romero-type zombies that stumble around and barely know how to even use tools. These are easily dispatched. The demon soldiers are back as well, though, and there's also a lot of them. In an interesting change of pace, you can actually hear their radio chatter when they're in the area nearby, although nothing intelligible is ever said. These guys can pack pistols, shotguns, shields, or, annoyingly, even chainguns. Thankfully, no matter how potent their firepower, it's relatively easy to put them down.

The version of the Arch-Vile that shows up in DOOM 3 is a massive pain in the ass, though. Previously, they only had the power to resurrect fallen demons, and although their attack was un-dodgeable, you could prevent it by breaking line of sight with them. These guys have no such limitations: they continuously spam spells that summon new demons and their attack is now this devastating column of fire that can hit you from several feet away. Very irritating. I used my strongest weapons to put them down ASAP when they showed up.

Lost Souls also get kind of an interesting change. Instead of being flaming skulls like in previous games, they're now fleshy, eerie humanoid faces that fly around and try to bite you. Thankfully, these nuisances have been vastly nerfed compared to previous games, and they hardly register as a threat unless they flank you while you're fighting something else.

The best redesign in DOOM 3, IMO, is the way the Pinky demon was changed. The mostly harmless, melee only enemy from previous DOOM games that was only dangerous amongst an encroaching horde of demons has been reimagined as something more feral and less bipedal, like a large, demonic dog. I remember the first one you encounter in the game scared the crap out of me when I was younger. In an intense setpiece, the thing violently starting ramming itself into the locked door leading into the room your character is in, warping the metal, before moving over to a glass pane and shattering it with a charge, forcing the panicked player to quickly dispatch it. 15 years on from when I first played it, there's not so much panic now, but it's still a cool moment.

Certain other designs tend to stay constant throughout the series. The Revenant, for example, is STILL just a skeleton with rocket launchers on its shoulders, although its lower half is covered in translucent skin instead of gore like the original design. Their missiles are particularly difficult to hit in this game, since they seem to move away from your bullet fire. I have to resort to spamming my pulse rifle in a circular motion to destroy their projectiles.

Imps are also broadly similar in design, although their appear WAY more often in DOOM 3 (seriously, you can't go more than a couple of rooms without running into an Imp in this game; they're easily the most common type of enemy) and if they get close to the player, in kind of a cool change, they're crouch down and pounce.

Barons of Hell, Mancubi, and Cacodemons return without huge alterations, although the Cacodemons are much faster and flit around a lot this time.

DOOM 3 introduces the Wraith, a smaller, melee-only creature that teleports around the level, trying to catch the player off-guard along with the Cherub, which look like small, winged babies that like to flit toward the player and bite them. There are also at least two new spider-like enemies that show up, often swarming the hallways ahead of you. They don't take a lot to kill, but they can easily overpower a less cautious player.

The Commando returns from DOOM II, although his form and function are so different that he's basically a new enemy. Anyone who has played Resident Evil 3: Nemesis is likely to get flashbacks to that game's eponymous monstrosity as this muscular hulk charges toward the player and tries to impale them with a large tentacle arm. These games react so quickly and aggressively that I had an issue with them throughout the game. As soon as I saw one of these, the rocket launcher came out.

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The game has a handful of boss encounters. While they still show up sort of randomly, I'd say these fights are more engaging and memorable than boss encounters from previous DOOM games, and can actually require some modicum of strategy. Crucially, their difficult isn't dependent on being impossible to dodge when hiding behind a column of some sort. So, yeah, this is definitely the strongest DOOM game to date on that front.

The soundtrack in this game is extremely ambient, like DOOM 64's. Now, that worked for DOOM 64 because of how silent that game was when you weren't fighting demons, but this is pretty much environmental noises: the game. There's so much whirring and buzzing and narration in the background that it can be hard sometimes to even find a quiet place to listen to an audio log. Going to youtube, the soundtrack isn't half-bad, but I'd be lying if I said I even noticed music throughout this game, so I'm going to call this the weakest DOOM game for me on that front. Aside from the decent main theme, you're never going to hear anything that gets your blood pumping, or even much that's particular atmospheric, since you're so busy listening to everything else in this game.

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DOOM 3: BFG Edition on Steam features achievements, but good luck unlocking them if you like to take screenshots. For whatever reason, in a widely documented bug that was apparently never patched out, taking screenshots in this game via the Steam overlay triggers an anti-cheat measure that disables the player's ability to unlock achievements.

Technically, DOOM 3: BFG Edition barely feels like an upgrade from the original, being a very slight HD remaster that allowed the game to run smoothly on modern operating systems and widescreen displays. Texture work is still very low-res, too, which becomes clear if you try actually examining most of the displays in your environment. With that said, DOOM 3 was a massive techncial achievement when it first released thanks to a combination of cutting-edge graphics and excellent art design, and, thanks to that, the game still looks really good today. In some ways, the original looked even better: in addition to the shoulder flashlight, the game has been brightened a bit overall, dulling some of the raw dread provoked by its corridors, destroyed by demons and caked in thick shadows But the overall artistic direction still results in a world that's easy to lose yourself in.

What else to mention? DOOM 3: BFG Edition adds in a new autosave system when you hit certain checkpoints in a level, which might have been useful on consoles, but on PC, where you literally only need to hit F5 to quicksave at pretty much any given point, it felt... needless. I guess the good thing is that the player almost never has to worry about losing much progress.

I wasn't sure where to fit this in, but I also really like the security robots in this game. There'll be these interesting setpieces throughout where you'll activate a little security robot, and it'll lead you through the darkness (in the original DOOM 3, anyway). In an amazing turn of events, though, the cute little guys are also armed to the teeth with machine gun rounds, and will viciously mow down any monster that happens to be in its pre-programmed path. I think you're supposed to defend it from enemies, but I found that they killed enemies so quickly that they barely needed any input from me. Granted, I also contributed, as it wouldn't be fair to let them do all the work.

Oh, and, when it comes to difficulty settings, go with Veteran. The only real difference between the difficulty settings (other than the bottom one, which appears to be some sort of safety mode) is in how much damage you take from enemy attacks, and, on the Marine difficulty (or, god forbid, the even lower Recruit difficulty), you can shrug off most attacks with ease. Combine this with the ease of access to health packs and healing centers, and the ammo strewn literally everywhere, and you wind up with a pretty radically easy game, devoid of much of a sense of danger. Veteran difficulty alleviates this by actually making it dangerous to take damage, although it doesn't seem to balance anything else. For all intents and purposes, it's this game's Normal difficulty.

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I was curious how I'd feel about this game. Ultimately, while I think it's an interesting experience in its own right, it's easy to see how this would disappoint someone looking for a DOOM experience in the vein of the previous games. This has all the trappings of DOOM, but it's missing the attitude. Additionally, the HD remaster, while probably a better fit for modern PCs, feels like it's at war with itself, and dialing back elements that made the original DOOM 3 so controversial. But, well, no superficial change is going to alter the fact that this is more horror than it is metal. I'm glad I got to experience it again, though, and I'm hoping to complete its expansions sooner than later.

Edited on by Ralizah

Current Games:

Astral Chain (Switch)

DOOM 3: BFG Edition (PC)

Paper Mario: The Origami King (Switch)

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