We return to the G.G series with the sports genre, this time looking at a soccer game with combative elements reminiscent of the Mario Strikers series. It somewhat succeeds in this attempt, but matches are seldom challenging and consequently feel dull. While the game mechanics themselves are solid enough, one can't help but feel a bit let down when G.G Series THROW OUT fails to present anything to meaningfully build on its foundations.

The premise sees players take control of a team of three robots as they compete against another team of three in a futuristic game of soccer. There are four different models to choose from which differ in stats such as speed or stamina, though the differences between them are marginal at best. Spritework and animation are on-point - as can be expected from a G.G game - though the same cannot be said of the soundtrack, which consists of a repetitive song that's been used in previous entries in the series. It would've been nice to have an original track featured here, and the choice to recycle an old one gives the game a generic, manufactured feel.

Gameplay unfolds in a typical soccer game fashion, with players switching control on the fly between their robots according to which one is closest to the ball. The key mechanic that ties it all together is that you can perform a slide tackle at the press of a button, stealing the ball and stunning the enemy temporarily. Matches consist of two three minute halves, which more often than not seems a little bit on the long side. This is due to the fact that the AI puts up fairly pitiful resistance - even in the "hard" mode - and fails to provide a meaningful challenge to the gamer. Balancing is bad enough that it gets to the point where you'll start to let the AI score a few points just to keep things mildly interesting.

Additionally, the lacklustre amount of content ensures that you'll likely become bored in a relatively short period of time. There are a grand total of two whole fields to play on and there's only one game mode that's disguised as two. Players are given the option of "Tournament" and "Team Battle", but the only difference between them is that Team Battles are one-off games that allow you to pick the opponent, while Tournament just puts you up against all four consecutively. It would have been nice if there was a bit more content on offer, as the paltry amount here will fail to entertain all but the most devoted for more than half an hour.

Conclusion

All in all, G.G Series THROW OUT is a disappointing game that struggles to maintain player interest for more than a few minutes. Pushover AI and a bare minimum amount of content are its biggest problems, and the player simply isn't given much reason to come back. It's a real shame, too, because the basic idea of the gameplay holds promise that could be capitalized upon were it to be polished up a bit more. We'd suggest that you skip out on this one, there's not much to be missed.