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Topic: Games You Recently Beat?

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Heavyarms55

@Ralizah That's fair enough I suppose.

Nintendo Switch FC: 4867-2891-2493
Switch username: Em
Discord: Heavyarms55 / SW 4867-2891-2493#1475
Pokemon Go FC: 3838 2595 7596
PSN: Heavyarms55zx

BruceCM

Witcher 3... Got best ending, although without either Triss or Yen, as going for former next time

SW-4357-9287-0699
Gamertag: BruceCM

kkslider5552000

I just beat Travis Strikes Again. It is one of the worst games that I'm entirely glad I played through.

...yeah. I dunno. This was a weird one. It did so much right yet so, so much wrong. Mostly it really exposed how necessary the parts between the action were in the first 2 games.

Non-binary, demiguy, making LPs, still alive

Bioshock Infinite Let's Play!:
LeT's PlAy BIOSHOCK < Link to LP

Tyranexx

My commentary this time around will be shorter than normal. No time to write a novel, I'm afraid. XD

Kirby's Adventure (NES, played on Wii U VC)

As a newer fan of Kirby after playing Kirby Super Star on the SNES Classic, I decided to try another "must play" Kirby game. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this one. The graphics for a late NES game blew me away as I wasn't expecting the rotation effects (like the giant fans and the rotating tower for one world)[/spoiler] to look so cool. The graphics in general have aged pretty well, the gameplay was tight and excellent, and the copy abilities were fun to steal and experiment with. Heck, the simple, addictive mini-games were even fun. The plot wasn't much to write home about, but the slight twist at the end was interesting. [spoiler]King Dedede isn't such a bad egg after all.

I think my only true complaint about this one was that it was over too soon. Some later stages were more frustrating than fun due to enemy placement, but I suppose that's part of the challenge. XD


Dragon Quest IV: Chapters of the Chosen (DS)

I'm still messing around with some post-game stuff but did reach the end credits a few days ago. This is only my second Dragon Quest game. I quite enjoyed it but think that I prefer V in the story department. The chapter for each character (or set of characters) is fun, unique, and does a great job exploring their motivations, something that only a handful of JRPGs really bother going in-depth about. The story becomes more cookie cutter in the final chapter, but it's still an enjoyable romp with some interesting turns on the way. I think this could have been alleviated somewhat by having party chat, but unfortunately that isn't included in the DS version for some reason. :/

The combat is standard turn-based JRPG fare, but it's fully functional and gets the job done. No complaints there. It's nice that you can automate some things by assigning tactics, but the trade-off is that the AI for your characters isn't always the best.

This cannot be understated, but the music tracks in this game, particularly some of the themes for the playable characters, are amazing.

I've had to grind more in this game than I'm comfortable with, but I suppose I shouldn't fault it for that too much since the original game was on the Famicom. A lot of the grind has been for the post-game content, but there were a few times during the main story where I also had to stop and beef up my characters' levels a bit.

All in all, DQ IV is a decent Dragon Quest game that I would recommend to any JRPG fan. Just be aware that it contains a little more grinding than in many more modern JRPGs. Plus, the DS version has party chat excluded, which I feel would have added more to the experience.

Currently playing: Breath of the Wild (Switch), Pushmo

Switch Friend Code: SW-3478-2466-4791 | Nintendo Network ID: Zelda_By_Night

NintendoByNature

It's been a while but i have a two'fer. Both on switch, Astral Chain and Sydney Hunter and the Curse of the Mayan

Both were really fun, but astral chain blew me away. 9.5/10

Sydney Hunter 7.5/10

I have alot to say about both but not sure i want to type it all out 😂

NintendoByNature

Ralizah

Spirit Hunter: Death Mark + DLC chapter

WHAT IS IT?
A horror game by developer Experience Inc. where you play as a cursed amnesiac (the curse manifests itself as a mark on the host's body that steals their memories before killing them) who, under the guidance of a mysterious talking doll named Mary, investigates paranormal mysteries and helps people confront the angry spirits and monsters that have also given them similar 'death marks.'

PLATFORM
Playstation Vita

LEVEL OF COMPLETION
Everything. Platinumed it.

Untitled

GAMEPLAY
Similar to the horror game Corpse Party: Book of Shadows, it's a classic adventure game (exploration happens across static screens where you pixel hunt for items to collect, objects to manipulate, and puzzles to solve) with heavy visual novel elements (lots of dialogue and automated, dialogue-driven sequences). Additionally, you'll frequently be confronted with "live or die" scenarios, where a health meter of sorts called "Soul Power" will run down as you're confronted with something dangerous (usually a run in with a lesser spirit), and you have to choose between three or four ways to react. If you react properly (you often get hints on how to react to these sequences based on information you learned earlier in the chapter), you'll not lose health from your meter; wrong answers or actions will see dramatic reductions to your available health meter, and, if it reaches zero, you'll die, and to start over either from your last save (you can save almost anywhere, thankfully) or from the beginning of the live or die scenarios. You'll find talismans hidden in your environment that will boost your available health in each chapter, thankfully.

In an interesting twist, almost every chapter in the game features a boss battle against the primary spirit you're investigating (a different one each chapter), where you have to engage in certain combinations of actions or combine certain items at the right time to either destroy or save the spirit (saving the spirit involves engaging it with items from its past life as a human, almost always found while investigating haunted locations throughout the chapter, that force it to confront the emotions of anger and grief that inform its campaign of terror in the first place; as is usually the case in Japanese ghost stories, the intense karmic impact of human brutality and cruelty continues to manifest itself even after everyone involved is long dead).

You meet new "mark bearers" each chapter, and the game allows you to take one other person with you on your investigation. While this seems like a fluff feature at first, you quickly learn that certain partners have certain skill sets that are required for beating certain challenges in the game (for example, in one boss fight, you'll want to bring along someone who knows how to play the piano).

PRO:

  • I love that, if you die in a "Live or Die" scenario or in a boss battle, you can restart from the beginning of the encounter right away. Great feature!
  • It's pretty standard for a VN, but I continue to appreciate when a fast-forward button is included that allows me to rapidly skip previously seen dialogue when I replay sections of the game for trophies.

CON:

  • Weirdly, in the menu screen, the game seems to assign a set of stats to each character, but these stats never seen to feature in the actual gameplay. It's just a strange bit of misleading design fluff.
  • While I appreciate how little of the "rub every combination of items together with every object in your environment to find out how to progress" nonsense this game has, I do find the amount of environmental interactivity here to be extremely limited.
  • Text changes color depending on whether the main character or someone else is speaking, but, without names on the textboxes or even character illustrations at many points, it can occasionally become confusing to ferret out who is saying what when three or more characters in a scene are talking together. Especially since this game has little to no voice acting. Not a huge issue, but little niggles like this eventually add up.
  • There are a noticeably large number of typos in this game. The localization script job seems a bit sloppy in a number of ways, actually. Count the number of times characters use the phrase "up and [x]" during the game, for example ("up and left;" "up and lied;" etc.)

Untitled

STORY/CHARACTERS
The game feels rushed to me. Each investigation flies by so quickly that the story never feels like it has time to really organically develop, and each chapter instead goes through the motions of shuffling you through a repetitive formula of sequences. It's a very rote form of storytelling.

The game shifts to an almost entirely new set of supporting characters with each new investigation, which makes it where we never get much time to spend with most of these people. Especially considering the investigations all take between 1.5 - 2 hours. Some of these characters are fun, but the constant turnover means we never really get attached to them.

This is remedied, weirdly, in the DLC chapter, which reunites most of the side characters introduced throughout the game to excellent effect. Actually, the DLC chapter is more developed story-wise and marginally more well-written, too.

Untitled

ART/CHARACTER DESIGNS/MUSIC
One of the highlights of the game is the art design. Environments are suitably atmospheric and beautifully gothic. Character designs find some middle ground between traditional anime and Junji Ito, and it works well with the horror setting. The CGs that crop up throughout the game, while often creepy and disturbing, are often weirdly detailed, and just gorgeous to look at. Despite the clearly low budget presentation, it still manages to be a reasonably attractive game to look at.

The monsters and spirits in this game are often spectacularly grotesque, but the game does a good job of mostly keeping them off-screen until the climax of an investigation for maximum effect. It's handling of the material is effective

One thing to note is the light but noticeable eroguro vibe this game has. While the game doesn't really feature heavy amounts of what might be called "fanservice," and the designs of the female characters are fairly normal and modest, there is quite a bit of implied, referenced, and after-the-fact sexualized violence against women in this game. You'll see a lot of voluptuous corpses in this game in various states of undress. Sexual assault, while never seen or played for cheap drama, does become a plot point as well. Doesn't bother me, but some people might want to know about this before buying the game.

The music, while not terribly memorable, does its job of communicating the horror atmosphere effectively. Sound design is decent throughout: while it probably wasn't the intended effect, the spooky chime noise and text that slowly crawls across the screen when the game is trying to scare you with something really gave me the giggles. There's a certain cheesiness to the whole affair, but not everything can be Silent Hill. In general, fans of ghost stories will dig what this game has to offer.

Untitled

CONCLUSION
While the game is saddled with pacing, translation, and QoL issues here and there, it was still, overall, a pleasant experience. One that was, unfortunately, over just a bit too quickly. The genre and art both resonate with me, so I had a good time. There's definite room for improvement, though, and I'm not sure I'd recommend someone pay full price for this.

Untitled

VERDICT
6.5/10

ACTIVELY PLAYING
Switch Lite: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch
PC: DOOM 2016 (post-game; cleaning up collectibles)

BruceCM

If you're planning to get DQI-III when they Switch, @Tyranexx .... Those are all more grindy, overall, with odd difficulty spikes scattered throughout In 1, you only have the hero, no companions. 2 introduced the party system & 3 expanded on gameplay significantly in several ways

SW-4357-9287-0699
Gamertag: BruceCM

NintendoByNature

Jet Kave Adventure on Switch

It's essentially a spiritual successor to dkc games. It even adds an element of action which is a nice change of pace. The jet pack adds a nice layer of strategy as well. You essentially have a double jump and then a "dash." Both of which make the platforming in the game very satisfying. The bosses are either way too easy, or sometimes pretty difficult. The good part is that every time you hit a checkpoint in a level, it refills your health. You're going to need it at times. There's little hidden areas to uncover, collectibles to be had, and good for speedrunning. Think it took me about 4 hours or so. My two gripes about the game are as follows.

-Price is kind of high
-the "racing levels" can be very tedious and frustrating. Objects approach you way to fast to move out of the way.

Other than that it's worth the time of any dkc fan. Maybe wait til it's on a sale though.

7/10

NintendoByNature

Tyranexx

@BruceCM Trust me, I'm prepared lol. I don't mind some grinding now and again, but the excessiveness of it is why I don't normally play many RPGs that came before the 16-bit era. I definitely want to try I at some point just to see where the series began. III is often highly praised. I'm happy to skip II from what I've read about it.

Currently playing: Breath of the Wild (Switch), Pushmo

Switch Friend Code: SW-3478-2466-4791 | Nintendo Network ID: Zelda_By_Night

BruceCM

Cool, @Tyranexx ... Played them on my phone, so I won't get the Switch ones

SW-4357-9287-0699
Gamertag: BruceCM

Justifier

Borderlands 3 on Xbox One. Took about a week for me to complete campaign. Loved it, even when it has little performance issues. Get my first character (FL4K) to level 50, and my Moze is now lv. 24. I have played that now about 110 hours, and now I think that I could play something else for a while.

"Wake me... when you need me."

Switch Friend Code: SW-0456-5973-9496 | 3DS Friend Code: 0533-4480-5285 | Nintendo Network ID: Justifier

Snaplocket

Just beat Astral Chain, awesome game, one of my favorites. 10/10

Edited on by Snaplocket

Switch FC: SW-0930-5375-7512
3ds FC: 3539-8977-1109

RR529

.Hack// G.U.: Rebirth, on the .Hack// G.U.: Recode collection (PS4) - singleplayer JRPG set in an MMO known as. "The World" where you take on the role of Haseo, a player who is determined to hunt down a mythical PK (Player Killer) known as Tri-Edge (mythical because it's said his victims fall into a coma in real life, and thus there's no first hand accounts of him) after a friend falls victim to him, and a later confrontation results in Haseo's character being knocked back from level 133 to 1 (all his acquired items are wiped too, so he literally has to start from square one, which isn't supposed to happen when one player kills another).

Pros:

  • This is definitely one of those JRPGs that's carried by it's story. There's a lot of cutscenes (and reading), revolving around personal character relationships, politics between guilds, and the greater narrative with Tri-Edge that could possibly have real world complications. It can be a bit much at times (it seems like a good long while before you get your first chance to save there's so many cutscenes at the start), but overall I found it all quite interesting.
  • The main menu is brilliantly intergrated into the world. It's set up like Haseo's PC screen (so it's like what he's seeing irl when not logged into The World), where you can check email, catch up on "real world" news articles (some which even have accompanying videos), and trawl through both official & and fan forums centering around The World. It can be a lot of reading, but it's recommended checking it out as much as possible, as certain threads can open up in game sidequests, and provide new outlooks on what's going on in the main story.

Mixed:

  • The action RPG gameplay is pretty serviceable, but nothing spectacular. It's pretty easy to overlevel yourself, and if you're even couple levels over an area's suggested level, you probably won't have to do much in terms of strategy (I had a stockpile of items because the only times I had to use any were during the couple times I optionally tackled an area with monsters quite a bit stronger than me, and the final boss). Special "Avatar" fights were actually really fun, but few & far between.

Cons:

  • There's not much environmental variety. From the game's main town you warp to the various dungeons, and they all have the same Field, Cave, or Japanese Castle aesthetic. The Field motif has a few different variants (day, evening, night, and rainy), but by & large after the first couple hours you've seen everything the game has to offer on this front. There's a method to create randomly generated dungeons as well if you want to take a break from the main story, but with the serviceable combat and samey environments this get's dull rather quickly.

Overall it's carried by it's, admittedly really interesting, narrative. I will play the next game in the collection, but after that I'll probably take a break before I go back to the last two.

Currently Playing:
Switch - Blade Strangers
PS4 - Kingdom Hearts III, Tetris Effect (VR)

NintendoByNature

Links Awakening on Switch. It's already one of my favorite games even before it was remade. The fresh coat of paint made it all the better. The warp points were a nice touch as well. I love how nice and compact the over world is. The dungeon design is great, the bosses are easy but still fun. And the story is pretty cool too. Being in my top 3 games of all time, it's an easy 10/10 from me.

NintendoByNature

klingki

Just finished Planet Alpha. Gorgeous game that is hurt a bit by either the Switch not having quite enough juice or poor optimization (or maybe a bit of both). Gameplay is solid, but nothing special, and even though it’s not a long game, it still felt like it dragged on a little too long. But the world just looks so good, and exploring it was mostly a fun experience. I’d give it a firm 7/10.

klingki

Ralizah

Celeste

WHAT IS IT?
A precision platformer with controls and gameplay reminiscent of earlier titles such as Super Meat Boy and Slime-San where you play as a depressed young woman named Madeline who is determined to climb to the summit of Mount Celeste, which is filled with mysteries and danger. She meets a variety of eclectic characters on her journey and is forced to confront a dark reflection of herself that manifests as a physical entity on the mountain.

PLATFORM
Nintendo Switch

LEVEL OF COMPLETION
Completed the normal levels for Chapters 1 - 8 and collected all the strawberries. Also unlocked and completed the B-side levels for Chapters 1 - 7 (Chapter 8's B-Side is locked behind an extra set of collectibles that are especially hidden with each level, and, honestly, after spending 25 hours over 4 days playing this, I'm a bit exhausted). Didn't complete the recently released Chapter 9 DLC, which I hear is the most challenging part of the game, but I'll come back to it someday.

Untitled

GAMEPLAY

The game is organized into a variety of chapters. Each chapter will generally advance the story, and is composed of a long series of primarily single-screen platforming challenges. While the game only requires the player to do the bare minimum to navigate to the end of the level, there are a host of collectibles, hidden and open, to collect along the way. Strawberries, the most prominent collectibles in the game, are objects that you usually have to go out of your way to collect. Normal strawberries also you to collect them however you like, but they usually require the player to complete the platforming challenge they were obtained during before the player is allowed to collect them. If you die immediately after having grabbed a strawberry, you'll have to go back and try for it again. Alternative strawberries include ones that are formed by collecting a certain number of items throughout a room without touching the ground, and one with wings that will fly away if you use your dash ability trying to get to them, forcing the player to rely on normal jumps and platforming mechanics to reach them. Each chapter will also have a crystal heart, which often requires extremely out-of-the-box thinking to obtain, and a B-side cassette, which unlocks a harder and often much longer version of a given level as an optional challenge.

Celeste's controls seem simple at first, but there is a ton of depth to the platforming in this game. Most of it won't be accessible to normal players, although the good news is that most people should be able to beat the game in its default difficulty with just normal jumps and dashes.

PRO:

  • I REALLY like how the game tells you how many strawberries are in each section of a chapter, and lets you jump right into that section to collect what you need. It also seems to autosave after successfully collecting a strawberry, which allows the player to jump in and out of stages at will.
  • Immediately restarting players at the start of a room when they die during a challenge is central to encouraging them to keep trying at a challenge.
  • The best levels in this game integrate level design/exploration/aesthetics/theme to create one compelling whole. The Mirror Temple near the middle of the game stands out in this regard.
  • I really like the way the ending changes depending on how many strawberries you've collected. Very cute.
  • I was tempted to create a separate section for this observation, since it could be either a pro or a con, depending on the person. The developers of this game seem to have a deep love for Nintendo games, and you'll find design aspects here that reference the Big N's games constantly. Characters jabber in a soft nonsense language reminiscent of Animal Crossing (thankfully, these sounds lack the ear-shredding quality found in another recent Nintendo-inspired indie adventure, Yooka-Laylee. Many of Madeline's abilities recall gameplay from older Nintendo games, be they the Super Metroid-esque wall jump exploit you can perform to conserve stamina, "wave-dashing," or the obviously Cosmic Mario-inspired sequences where Madeline's shadow mirrors her movements and kills her if she catches up.

CON:

  • Crystal Heart locations are often unintuitive. The one in the second or third chapter (I forget) has you dashing upward by phasing back and forth between screen transitions. It's a clever design choice, but the problem is I don't recall the game ever making a point of introducing this aspect of the design in any way, which makes it feel less like a collectible and more like an Easter Egg. Except late game content is hidden until you obtain these collectibles.
  • I don't like the level design in the B-sides. It's reminiscent of a lot of Super Mario Maker levels I've played insofar as they rely on repeatedly pulling off a certain series of platforming moves in exactly the same way in a sequence until you clear a room. Like many Mario Maker levels, these platforming moves are forced by covering nearly every inch of the screen that you're not supposed to touch in instakill spikes. It's incredibly uncreative and lazy.
  • More broadly, there are too many levels, even in the main part of the game, where there's little to no design openness. More often than not, there's only one correct way to clear a challenge, and it even requires identical timing with the jumps and whatnot.
  • This might seem like a weird criticism, but the way platforms are oriented within levels in this game often feel very inorganic and abstract, as if they were designed for a video game and nothing else. Compare to a game like DKC: Tropical Freeze, where every level element feels like it belongs within that environment, and elements work together to create a coherent environmental picture.
  • Celeste sometimes teaches game mechanics passively through good level design, but oftentimes it leaves the exact operations of things a complete mystery. The game really doesn't explain its stamina system, for example, and good luck consistently triggering high jumps on springs and bouncy clouds until you figure out the timing that the game gives you no idea about.

Untitled

STORY/CHARACTERS

Celeste is marginally more engaging than games with similar mechanics and challenges due to how the game structures the levels in such a way that you feel like you're going on an adventure, as opposed to just trying to go from left to right in linear stages. Part of this is due to the light narrative focus. The best stages in this game combine a persistent narrative thread with complex, exploratory level design, which helps to develop the context that Madeline's journey up the mountain is a sort of psycho-spiritual odyssey for her. Not every stage is like this, but these sections help to distinguish Celeste from many of its indie game peers.

Plot-wise, a lot of interesting ideas are hinted at or suggested and then promptly abandoned throughout the game. While this is frustrating in some respects, I do like how the developer keeps the game laser-focused on Madeline's subjective experience throughout. Not every game needs to be an epic, or deeply plumb the mysteries and lore of imagined settings; for better or for worse, whatever bizarre contrivances are hinted at throughout, it's just set design for Madeline's journey of personal growth.

There are a number of colorful characters that Madeline meets on her adventure, and they're fun, but mostly underdeveloped, and are typically characterized by one overriding character trait. As mentioned before, the game is focused on Madeline, so the rest of the characters who aren't Madeline (or her double) end up going fairly undeveloped.

Untitled

ART/CHARACTER DESIGNS/MUSIC

I'm a bit conflicted here. While the game's environments often make wonderful use of color to offer up vibrant backdrops, the pixel art for the characters is horrible. There's no detail to them at all. I obviously don't expect hyper-detailed WayForward-esque sprites, but this, at least visually, often feels like about a thousand other lazy indie games out there.

The CGs that periodically pop up during chapters and bookend each chapter are frequently adorable and full of personality.

The game is more consistently excellent on the music front. Composer Lena Raine's gorgeous tracks, often piano-dominated, exude a variety of emotions and do a great job of immersing the player throughout. There are some really stellar remixes from other artists during the B-side levels as well. There aren't too many indie games with soundtracks this good, honestly, and it's another element that really elevates Celeste above its peers.

Untitled

CONCLUSION
Celeste is a fun, challenging, and fairly memorable platformer with a strong central narrative, compelling music, and a lengthy campaign that rewards players who persist and attempt to engage with as much of the game's content as possible. Terrible pixel art for the characters, lacking character and story development (not related to Madeline), and some quibbles with the game design drag it down a bit for me, but I enjoyed my time with it.

Untitled

VERDICT
8/10

Edited on by Ralizah

ACTIVELY PLAYING
Switch Lite: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch
PC: DOOM 2016 (post-game; cleaning up collectibles)

Glitchling78

Forager for Switch
Completion: About 85%
Time spent: 25 hours
This game has a very different feel depending on how far in you are, I found one half far more enjoyable than the other.
At the start it feels like a faster paced Stardew Valley. You’re basically foraging with your pickaxe to collect materials, which you craft into helpful items. There’s a farming mechanic, you have to regularly eat. Earning money allows you to expand the available map. You have a levelling up system tied to a skill tree. The abilities on the skill tree offered quite substantial buffs. This part of the game is a really rewarding loop of gaining stuff, exploring and figuring out puzzles. There would always be something to do and it always felt like you were making progress.

About 15 hours in a couple of things happened. I got an ability which meant you gain exp tied to value of items sold (I believe 1 gold = 1 exp). It also turned out I could craft a valuable item with two materials I had built up an over abundance of. I crafted and sold this and was suddenly awarded hugely in both money and exp. I discovered this naturally by accident. This meant rapid expansion of the map, my abilities and automation. The last one was what killed it for me. I gained an ability which auto collected all crafted items. Also gained a few droids which collected materials while walking around by firing lasers at them. Also gained mining rods which automatically harvested materials. This lead to an explosion of sound effects, things whizzing around the screen, controller rumble and notifications. This was overwhelming and incredibly grating. I turned off sound effects and rumble but the the game was still a visual mess. You do have the option to stop some of the automation but this would have made gaining late game items a massive grind. I did turn off the droids in the end which helped a little. This section of the game is not fun to play on a sensory level and is tediously easy.

There are a couple of things which stay consistently fun throughout however. Like Stardew and My Time at Portia there’s a museum which you are encouraged to fill with found and crafted items. This is fun and rewarding to figure out.
There are also fun puzzles and dungeons. The puzzles can be real headscratchers. The dungeons basically revolve around a gimmick and a newly acquired tool.

What is not fun however is a bug I encountered which has locked me out of about 3 achievements. If you do get this game, do not build on the rainbow island until you complete the puzzle. This can lock you out of completing the puzzle, even if you destroy the buildings you placed. This was patched in the PC version but frustratingly not here.

I wanted a similar experience to Stardew Valley and while it started that way and was enjoyable, it quickly spiralled into an overwhelming mess that was constantly annoying. I think with some balance changes (especially reducing sell prices on bombs and not making lighthouse effects stack) and the ability to turn off the notifications & sounds when gaining items this could be a great game.

Glitchling78

NotTelevision

@Ralizah Wow that’s a really great review. Do you do this for a living?

I definitely understand the praise Celeste gets. It’s a brilliantly designed game and definitely one of the best in the “twitch platformer” genre that was in vogue for a while.

My biggest criticism of the game actually has to do with the heavy handed narrative. I saw where it was going fairly early on and some of the interludes hammer home the point even further. Maybe I’m just too jaded or something to be moved by the simplistic metaphor the story sets up, but it is the case nonetheless.

I agree with you though. A solid 8/10 experience.

NotTelevision

Ralizah

@NotTelevision Thanks! No, I just enjoy sharing my thoughts on games I've played.

One can definitely see where the narrative is going if one is acquainted with the various plot devices and tropes in this game. The narrative doesn't really do anything new, persay. But I did feel like it handled themes such as self-acceptance, self-overcoming, self-doubt, mental illness, meaninglessness, etc. fairly well. ESPECIALLY in the context of the genre the game is situated within. I was afraid, based on what I've heard about it, that I'd get something like Super Meat Boy with a hammy, tacked feel-good narrative about overcoming your doubts and whatnot. I mean, that's not completely off-base, but I felt like the game mostly stuck the landing in that regard.

One aspect I liked a lot was the unusual amount of attention that was given to Madeline's shadow self, and the way her relationship with Madeline evolved over the course of the game. Given the mystical nature of the environment Madeline finds herself in and the way their conversations go, my presumption is that, instead of being some non-sentient representation of Madeline's worst traits (like the shadow forms of characters in Persona 4, for example), Madeline's shadow is actually a sort of thoughtform that was given life by Madeline unconsciously as a result of her struggles with mental illness. It's an interesting treatment of a familiar idea.

I played another game last year called Iconoclasts that reminded me of this, because it was a simplistic indie platformer that was trying to distinguish itself with an unusual focus on story and character development. Unfortunately, I felt like that game collapsed under the weight of a complex story it couldn't pace or develop properly, so I think the more intimate and restrained approach Celeste took was for the best.

Edited on by Ralizah

ACTIVELY PLAYING
Switch Lite: Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch
PC: DOOM 2016 (post-game; cleaning up collectibles)

MarioLover92

I beat Link's Awakening for the very first time on Switch not too long ago. This is an excellent remake! It's much easier to play thanks to the Switch having much more buttons. Everything was recreated faithfully, so I could tell there's been a lot of love and care put into it. Oh and I adore the Mario references! Now I have an even harder time coming back to the 3DS Virtual Console version, lol

My only true gripe was of course, the framerate issue. It doesn't make the game unplayable by any means, but it's definitely noticeable. I would've liked true analog control too, but it wasn't a huge issue for me (though the fact that you can't control Link with the D-pad is...questionable). I didn't spend too much time in the dungeon maker either, it just didn't hold my interest for long.

Overall, great Zelda game. It's one of the easier ones so I recommend Link's Awakening for a more chill Zelda experience.

@Ralizah Oh yeah, I beat Celeste too! Though it can get a tad frustrating at times, I enjoyed it as a whole. It's hard for sure, but I thought it was the fun and fair kind of hard. Loved the ending too, it was quite heartwarming

Happy Holidays from Mario's #1 fan! Wahoo!

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