30. Phantasy Star Online: Episode I & II (GCN)

Phantasy Star Online: Episode I & II (GCN)
Phantasy Star Online: Episode I & II (GCN)
Publisher: Atari / Developer: SEGA
Release Date: 29th Oct 2002 (USA) / 7th Mar 2003 (UK/EU)

While GameCube had the capacity for online play thanks to an adaptor which plugged into a port on the bottom of the console, very few games supported it. Phantasy Star Online: Episode I & II was the main reason to own the adaptor (as well as the rather brilliant ASCII Keyboard controller which essentially split a standard GameCube controller down the middle and welded keyboard between the two halves). Online RPGs are a dime-a-dozen these days on consoles, but Sonic Team's game was many console gamers' first brush with an online world and it developed a loyal following until Sega shut down servers in 2007.

29. Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean (GCN)

Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean (GCN)
Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean (GCN)
Publisher: Namco / Developer: Monolith Soft
Release Date: 16th Nov 2004 (USA) / 1st Apr 2005 (UK/EU)

Co-developer Monolith Soft would go on to have great success on Nintendo systems with the Xenoblade Chronicles games, but this Namco-published JRPG still has its fans and stands out on GameCube thanks to a relatively slim library of RPG titles. Baten Kaitos fused turn-, action- and card-based mechanics into a unique battle system. Playing as an overseeing guardian, the player interacts directly with the characters rather that ‘controlling’ them, which gives it a unique flavour apart from other games in the genre.

28. Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (GCN)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (GCN)
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (GCN)
Publisher: Ubisoft / Developer: Ubisoft
Release Date: 18th Nov 2003 (USA) / 20th Feb 2004 (UK/EU)

Ubisoft's 3D take on the iconic 2D original spawned a large number of sequels, but arguably none of them had the finesse and focus of Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time which used the same engine developed for Beyond Good & Evil. Sewing a rewind mechanic into the very fabric of the game, there's an elegance to the gameplay that got lost in the subsequent games where everything went a bit emo. This was one of several top-notch multiplatform releases which came to GameCube and it's definitely worth winding the clock back and taking another look at this classic.

27. Super Monkey Ball (GCN)

Super Monkey Ball (GCN)
Super Monkey Ball (GCN)
Publisher: SEGA / Developer: Amusement Vision
Release Date: 17th Nov 2001 (USA) / 3rd May 2002 (UK/EU)

Times they were a-changing back in the early 2000s and for gamers there was no surer sign than a Nintendo console launching with a game from arch-rivals Sega. Fortunately, Sega hit the ground running (or should that be rolling?) on other companies' hardware with Super Monkey Ball, a fantastically surreal and vibrant series of gauntlets that had you tilting the terrain to guide a monkey in a ball to a goal. It really is all in the title, and while Sega fans might have felt blue at the time, this was a great indication that the company's spirit would live on.

26. TimeSplitters Future Perfect (GCN)

TimeSplitters Future Perfect (GCN)
TimeSplitters Future Perfect (GCN)
Publisher: Electronic Arts / Developer: Free Radical
Release Date: 21st Mar 2005 (USA) / 24th Mar 2005 (UK/EU)

The third entry in the Timesplitters series, this continued iterating on the multiplayer-focused gameplay from many of the makers of GoldenEye 007 and Perfect Dark. Future Perfect added a co-op story mode to proceedings as well as enabling players to create outdoor maps in an undated Mapmaker. The game offered GameCube owners another fine dose of deathmatch FPS goodness, although unfortunately they missed out on the online play enjoyed by PS2 and Xbox owners.

25. Super Monkey Ball 2 (GCN)

Super Monkey Ball 2 (GCN)
Super Monkey Ball 2 (GCN)
Publisher: SEGA / Developer: Amusement Vision
Release Date: 25th Aug 2002 (USA) / 14th Mar 2003 (UK/EU)

From the team behind F-Zero GX, Super Monkey Ball 2 added something that was desperately lacking in the original game - a Story Mode. Yes, if you were wondering how or why these simians were trapped inside transparent balls and being flung around on surreal floating stages, this sequel now provided a much-needed narrative context and Monkey Ball lore was born.

Joking aside, it offered more of the same great gameplay from the original and proved to be just as brilliant a party game. There's nothing not to like!

24. SoulCalibur II (GCN)

SoulCalibur II (GCN)
SoulCalibur II (GCN)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Namco
Release Date: 27th Aug 2003 (USA) / 29th Sep 2003 (UK/EU)

The Dreamcast original SoulCalibur was a momentous fighting game for home consoles that brought arcade-quality visuals into the home that had even the staunchest fanboys on other consoles gawping jealously at Sega's ill-fated system. Fortunately for them, a multiplatform sequel would arrive in 2003 and GameCube got a bonus that made it the definite pick of the bunch. Yes, the impressive visuals and weapon-based brawling was all present and correct, but Nintendo gamers were treated to Link from The Legend of Zelda joining the roster with the Master Sword in hand. That single detail was enough to draw in players who might never have touched it otherwise, and very glad they were, too. Take Link out and it's still an excellent fighting game, but he really was the cherry on this rather delicious cake.

23. Pikmin (GCN)

Pikmin (GCN)
Pikmin (GCN)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 2nd Dec 2001 (USA) / 14th Jun 2002 (UK/EU)

Shigeru Miyamoto takes up gardening and before you know it he's cracked out Nintendo's version of the Real-Time Strategy genre! Featuring tiny little plant creatures that you order around in groups to pick up rubbish, harvest fruit and battle bugs and other beasties, it's disarmingly charming and utterly bloodthirsty at the same time. You become very protective of the little critters that do your bidding and there's an immense feeling of guilt when you accidentally command a legion into a watery grave or awaken a nest of sleeping monsters that proceed to munch though great swathes of your army. The sequel might have had some great refinements and additions, but there's something to be said about the taut design and focus of the original Pikmin. We like it a lot.

22. TimeSplitters 2 (GCN)

TimeSplitters 2 (GCN)
TimeSplitters 2 (GCN)
Publisher: Eidos / Developer: Free Radical
Release Date: 16th Oct 2002 (USA) / 1st Nov 2002 (UK/EU)

Developed by Free Radical, a studio formed from several of the people behind N64 Rareware hits GoldenEye 007 and Perfect Dark, this sequel built on the foundation of the PlayStation original with a more satisfying story, more refinement... and generally more of everything. For Nintendo gamers smarting after Rare joined Microsoft's stable of development studios, Timesplitters 2 offered a thrillingly familiar-feeling multiplayer FPS deathmatch experience which we'd love to see return in some capacity on modern systems, especially handheld hybrid ones produced by Nintendo. Until then, we'll have to make do this the GameCube original.

21. Resident Evil (GCN)

Resident Evil (GCN)
Resident Evil (GCN)
Publisher: Capcom / Developer: Capcom
Release Date: 30th Apr 2002 (USA) / 13th Sep 2002 (UK/EU)

The original Resident Evil was a zombie B-movie classic which cemented the idea of survival horror in the minds of a generation, but also had a gloriously dodgy script and goofy characters that the series steered away from in subsequent entries. With REmake Capcom sought to realign the original with the upmarket production values of the later games, and boy did it succeed on that count. A complete overhaul of the PlayStation original, the power of the GameCube was put to use in conjunction with the beautifully repainted static backgrounds that still hold up today to produce a moody, evocative version of the Spencer Mansion we knew. With nods to its shlocky past, the game held surprises for veterans who knew the original inside out and arguably represents the best of the classic style, pre-RE4 entries in the venerable Biohazard series. For a system which looked so kid-friendly, it sure had some cracking M-rated games.