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Topic: Is mobile gaming the new standards for handheld gaming now?

Posts 21 to 30 of 30

MrVariant

Mobile is fun, just wish that it could do choose your own adventure like you are deadpool a lot better than manual go to pages where you choose. But for games, I like angry birds, to arms, an occasional Kemco RPG, lost frontier and pro strategy football.

MrVariant

Magician

Significant portions of the gaming industry have adopted mobile gaming tendencies. Live services that lean towards recurring revenue, player engagement, and loot boxes. A healthy chunk of annual revenue for EA, Activision, Take Two, and Ubisoft are from those mobile gaming tropes. All you have to do is look at the overall revenue of the mobile section of gaming versus the dedicated console/handheld gaming section.

As the hobby edges towards an all-digital future, console gaming will invariably edge closer to resemble mobile gaming.
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Heavyarms55

It seems unfortunately true that this is the case. It's easier for the average person to get a game on their phone or tablet. Easier and cheaper.

But mobile games are inferior products. That's just a fact. They make up for their lower quality with quantity. There are far more smartphones in the wild than gaming devices and PCs.

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Krull

Heavyarms55 wrote:

But mobile games are inferior products. That's just a fact. They make up for their lower quality with quantity.

Not disputing that, per se, but I'd argue that mobile games are not intrinsically inferior. The race to the bottom in the mobile market means it is unfeasible for studios/developers to sink AAA budgets into a mobile title, because - no matter how large the potential market - they are unlikely to ever get their money back, let alone make a profit.

The handful of (in their day) AAA games that have made a successful port to mobile, such as The World Ends with You, Dragon Quest VIII or Ghost Trick, show that neither the hardware nor even the interface is the limiting factor. Trouble is, I could look at Game Centre (back when it was still accessible in Apple's OS) and see that I was one of fewer than 1,000 people to buy TWEWY on iOS. I'm guessing others bought it without ever signing into Game Centre, but it doesn't suggest the mobile audience is willing to support top-tier software for a respectable price.

Apple's curated service is probably the only way to rescue the mobile gaming market, by targeting an audience that actually wants, appreciates and - above all - is willing to pay for higher quality experiences. It might actually work. But even if it doesn't, it is at least a concerted effort to find what market exists for better-quality gaming on your phone or tablet.

Although I won't be signing up, partly as I hate the idea of subscription-based gaming, I kind of hope Apple succeeds. Because mobile, for all its gatcha and F2P nonsense, has been a springboard for innovative and immersive experiences, eg The Room, Threes, Steven Universe: Attack the Light, Device6, Year Walk, Card Thief, Reigns and anything and everything by Inkle or Michael Brough (868-HACK is a rogue-like of utter genius).

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JungleHeart

Heavyarms55 wrote:

It seems unfortunately true that this is the case. It's easier for the average person to get a game on their phone or tablet. Easier and cheaper.

But mobile games are inferior products. That's just a fact. They make up for their lower quality with quantity. There are far more smartphones in the wild than gaming devices and PCs.

I fully agree with the 2 points raised on this post: (1) it's easier for the average person to game on a mobile phone which is a device owned by almost everybody, and (2) while I don't agree that mobile games are inferior products per se, they do indeed make up for quality via quantity - not just in the number of titles available, but via gameplay as well, it's always involved with numbers.

I also hated the gacha mechanic wherein your best experience of the game is dependent on random factors. I want to share an article written by a friend (I'm very sorry if this is not allowed, please take it down if it is - but please check it first, I enjoyed reading because the points raised are very good)

https://blog.playerauctions.com/others/the-psychology-of-gach...

It perfectly captures why I dislike the whole gacha thing T_T

Currently playing: Elden Ring
Tools of choice: Switch and Series X
Works as a freelance writer
https://blog.playerauctions.com/all-posts/

NinChocolate

If you grew up with game boy, good chance you’re into handheld gaming. If you grew up with a DS, you’re probably playing mobile games now

Edited on by NinChocolate

NinChocolate

TommyTendo

It's really not fun playing on mobile.
The 3DS was perfect

TommyTendo

DisneyFarms

I think it has indeed. I have no problem with it though aside from being very picky about the kind of mobile gaming that’s going on. I have a set of standards like “it has to be three dimensional” or “it can’t just be point-and-click like a phone game”. It annoys me when I go on the online game stores and see that most of the fare appear to be what I consider to be simple iPhone games… I prefer things like “Harvest Moon”, “Pokémon” or even “Kingdom Hearts”, the way those are on their main consoles. Not simple scrolling or touching with my fingertips. I guess you could say, I prefer D-Pad/Joystick games or even sometimes a game you can play on PC with a mouse and keyboard.

Before anyone asks, my favorite Pokémon is MewTwo.

I am also a horror film fan and my top favorites are “Trick ‘R Treat”, “Texas Chainsaw Massacre”, “IT” and “Carrie”, remakes included.

chima22

For me it's impossible to compare mobile games with video games.

chima22

Cybergirl

You know, I think yes. Or rather... I think that mobile and computer games complement each other. For example, at home I could play on my PC, and at university/coffee shop/bus on my phone. Honestly, I don't know what I would do if I didn't have metarun in my life right now, because I just started to come out of a prolonged depression and it can be very difficult for me to be outside if I can't "hide" in my phone. There's a computer at home, okay. Elsewhere I'm left unprotected. I realize you'll say it's an addiction. But what's wrong with playing games to help me live?

Edited on by Cybergirl

I love video games and games with my sense of reality. I like independence and comfort. And I hate to be dependent. I'm young but have a really great life experience. I'm smart. I'm genius. I'm a cyborg.

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