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Topic: Is it safe to assume Nintendo's next gen console will be compatible with Switch game cards? (Maybe you already bought BOTW, Mario 3D All-Stars for the next gen console?)

Posts 21 to 40 of 51

WoomyNNYes

@WoomyNNYes the others would either benefit from still having physical media, or they'll end up converting. Kind of like how Samsung originally boasted about still having the audio jack when Apple removed theirs, and then they promptly removed the audio Jack on their phones as well.

@VoidofLight Good point, but that move was made because phones are so expensive, and it's essential to carry them daily, and protecting your phone from the elements is a big concern/selling point. Granted, the Switch is portable, and probably has fallen in toilets somewhere. But I don't think waterproofing the Switch is a big selling point; The Switch has vents, a fan, game card slot, analog sticks, physical buttons, detachable joy cons - waterproofing them would likely compromise function/experience.

Edited on by WoomyNNYes

Science liker
Extreme bicycle rider
Playing: Rocket League, Mario Galaxy, Sunshine.

VoidofLight

@WoomyNNYes I mean, I can see where physical media support could be axed to cut costs, since a disk drive would be seen as unnecessary, and expensive to some.

(Insert creative or cool phrase here.)

Magician

I just want a Switch that fits in my pocket.

Get me a Switch version of the FunKey S now, today.

Well...perhaps in fifteen years or so.
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Edited on by Magician

Switch Physical Collection - 689 games (as of April 15th, 2021)
Currently playing: Hades (Switch)
Favorite Quote: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -Arthur C. Clarke

VoidofLight

@Magician That's be interesting, but the screen could be too small to really enjoy playing many games on it, unless it'll be able to be docked.

(Insert creative or cool phrase here.)

Mr-Fuggles777

I'm one of the few that actually prefers digital as its less clutter and only buy physical versions when I find them on sale (or in the case of wii-U ports pre owned simply to stop Nintendo getting paid twice from me).

If the next Nintendo console isn't fully backwards compatible with my switch digital library at least I'm going to skip it as I'm sick of buying the same games over and over. I can't see them sticking with Carts, especially as hardware improves and it can handle bigger games, most ps4 games are between 50 and 100gb - I've got 3TB storage and it's almost full, imagine trying to keep that much data on a handheld.

I grabbed a Series S because it was cheap and instantly had access to my library of over 300 games - I haven't even owned an xbox console since the start of last gen and I got bored of my Xb1 yet those games were still there waiting for me to come back.

That's what should happen on the next Nintendo gen, it still annoys me that I can't play my digital wii-U games on the switch when there is literally no reason apart from Nintendo being Nintendo.

My handwriting is really bad - no one can read my Signature

My Nintendo: Badger | Nintendo Network ID: SW-7629-6884-5091

jump

@Magician I think the way to do that would be with a flexi screen. Probably too pricey for Ninty right now though,

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Nicolai wrote:

Alright, I gotta stop getting into arguments with jump. Someone remind me next time.

Switch Friend Code: SW-8051-9575-2812 | 3DS Friend Code: 1762-3772-0251

VoidofLight

@jump honestly, that'd be so awesome to have. A system that can literally fold in your pocket, as if it's a piece of paper.

(Insert creative or cool phrase here.)

Dezzy

I'm 90% sure it will be, mostly because I just don't see them coming up with a particularly different concept for their next console. The console/handheld hybrid just seems like the best situation for Nintendo, given how much Japan has abandoned home consoles, and yet the west hasn't.

The only other alternative for them is to go back to having a handheld and a home console as separate devices, but they've almost never managed that successfully. (Gameboy + SNES and then Wii + DS were the only times they managed it where both hardware were big successes)

So that said, I expect their next console to just be a more powerful version of the current setup, maybe with a few new features. I also don't expect it any time soon. I think we'll get a Switch Pro at christmas, and that will keep this gen going for another 3 years or so.

Edited on by Dezzy

It's dangerous to go alone! Stay at home.

VoidofLight

@Dezzy I feel like them going back to managing two different consoles at once would be a huge downgrade. The switch is probably one of their best ideas, mainly because it's a system that can play huge console games on the go.

(Insert creative or cool phrase here.)

ThanosReXXX

@WoomyNNYes Well, although this point was true for most past consoles and handhelds, there have been some developments in later years, where these features were less supported and as of the release of the Switch, Nintendo exclusively turned to digital releases, or rather remakes, of past generation's titles, so personally, although there's obviously always a chance that there WILL be some options in some form or other, I wouldn't just automatically assume that the new console will support Switch cartridges by default.

And perhaps needless to say, but with Nintendo's new console, I don't mean the rumored Switch Pro, but a completely new device that is actually a new generation for Nintendo systems.

'The console wars are like boobs: Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

Mountain_Man

@WoomyNNYes Starting with the Game Boy Advance for handhelds, and the Wii for consoles, Nintendo has traditionally maintained one generation of backwards compatibility. The exception, of course, is the Switch. Nobody knows what's in store for the future.

Edited on by Mountain_Man

The Mountain Man

ophone

Even if I hold on to physical media, the vast majority will move on to digital, even if physical games will continue to cater to a niche audience.
Just like with music: There are not many people left who own a big CD or records library but there's still a market for both.

Since January 2021 owner of my first real Nintendo "home" console. Having a blast and feeling no software drought at all, quite the contrary.

Balta666

I can see them doing that for cartridges but would be also good to see them unify your account with the switch one and therefore giving you acess to all your digital library like PlayStation and Xbox do (I am pretty sure but not certain as I don't own any of those platforms)

Balta666

BruceCM

Well, you couldn't play any PS3 games on PS4, @Balta666 .... While XBox One could play most 360 stuff, there were exceptions & it could only do a relatively few from the original XBox. As far as I'm aware, all of that & all your XB1 stuff should be playable on either Series model, though
While PS5 can play most PS4 games, for some reason some that got upgrades for the newer console made saves incompatible, which is weird. Not sure it plays anything from older consoles, either.

SW-4357-9287-0699
Steam: Bruce_CM

Mountain_Man

ophone wrote:

Just like with music: There are not many people left who own a big CD or records library but there's still a market for both.

The only reason music was able to make a successful transition to digital with little if any pushback from consumers is because, first of all, the music industry has widely embraced non-proprietary and non-protected formats like MP3 and FLAC, meaning that you buy it, you download, and it's yours to keep forever. Secondly, your music files can be played on any device without restriction. If you buy an album published by Sony Music, for example, you don't need a proprietary Sony device to listen to it.

Personally, I would love it if the movie, television, and gaming industries followed the music industry's consumer-friendly example.

The Mountain Man

jump

@Mountain_Man That was the music industry 10 years ago, now it's mostly streaming based and it has largely mucked up things for the average musician (not including the HUGE acts like Lady Gaga or whoever) who now are no longer able to make a living selling music and must tour constantly instead.

A musician (who plays venues of around 600ish people for context of size) I like posted a breakdown of what they make against the minimum wage.

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Nicolai wrote:

Alright, I gotta stop getting into arguments with jump. Someone remind me next time.

Switch Friend Code: SW-8051-9575-2812 | 3DS Friend Code: 1762-3772-0251

Mana_Knight

When people say that we will lose our games once the E-shop dies, does that just mean that we would be unable to re download them if your unit dies or you delete them off your switch by mistake? Or that trying to play them after an E-shop closure would literally mean that they won't load?

Mana_Knight

Magician

@Mana_Knight

That's a multi-layered question. Firstly, Nintendo will eventually shut down the eShop, at that point you would be unable to redownload your purchases. But that probably won't happen for quite some time, ten or fifteen years from now, maybe. Secondly, games you've downloaded but the eShop is no longer available? Well, it depends on the game. Those games that can operate offline will still be playable, but the online-only games will probably no longer be accessible.

Switch Physical Collection - 689 games (as of April 15th, 2021)
Currently playing: Hades (Switch)
Favorite Quote: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." -Arthur C. Clarke

Mana_Knight

Thank you @Magician. Food for thought indeed. Might need to pick up a choice title or two somewhere down the line as a physical where possible.

Mana_Knight

Mountain_Man

jump wrote:

@Mountain_Man That was the music industry 10 years ago, now it's mostly streaming based and it has largely mucked up things for the average musician (not including the HUGE acts like Lady Gaga or whoever) who now are no longer able to make a living selling music and must tour constantly instead.

Touring has always been where music artists make their money. Labels make money from music sales; artists make money from concerts and merchandise.

As for streaming, yes, that's big business right now, but there is still no shortage of ways to buy music as downloadable CD-quality files unencumbered by DRM that are yours to use and keep without restriction. This is essentially the same model that GOG.com has adopted for games, but they are the industry exception.

Edited on by Mountain_Man

The Mountain Man

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