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Re: Do you feel like the Switch is going to be a let down?

TheMisterManGuy

If you were expecting any sort of radical shift in Nintendo's philosophical and idealogical views on gaming, of course you're going to be disappointed. Nintendo might be done with the Wii brand, but the philosophies and technology that it introduced still remain within the company and they're never going to go away.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: The Nintendo Switch Thread

TheMisterManGuy

A few days ago, I managed to stumble across this image pertaining to the Nintendo Switch

http://i.imgur.com/JibXWN8.png

This means that Switch games can exclude and support different modes depending on what the developers intend for the game. Which means, we might see "mode exclusive" games for the Switch, or at least, mode exclusive features for Switch games. This opens up more possibilities and control options for Switch games. This means we could see touch controlled games only playable in Handheld mode, or co-op games only playable in Tabletop mode. The possibilities are endless

TheMisterManGuy

Re: The Nintendo Switch Thread

TheMisterManGuy

Operative wrote:

I think it might be possible they don't bundle a game just because there's no real hardware gimmick that they can show off. With the wii, wii sports showed off the different ways you could use the wii remote. The wii u had Nintendoland to show off asymmetrical gameplay. What game would show off the Switch's features without requiring that you play on the TV and on the go?

I think Nintendo should focus on games that are just as fun to play on the go, as they are at home. Stuff that's simple and filling enough to be played in short bursts at an airport, but also compelling and engaging enough that you also want to play it on a TV for hours on end. It's a very delicate balance to strike.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: The Nintendo Switch Thread

TheMisterManGuy

Throughout the Wii and DS era, Nintendo began releasing many "lifestyle" games. These games include Brain Age, Nintendogs, Wii Sports, Wii Fit, Personal Trainer, and some basic puzzle games like Picross, and Crosswords. These weren't so much traditional games, as they were extensions of everyday life for people who never really played games. These were great games, and helped lay the blueprints for the modern mobile market. But that's the problem, these kinds of software now thrive on mobile devices, where the new generation of non-gamers are. So much so that when Nintendo made sequels for the Wii U and 3DS in hopes that lightning would strike twice, they failed miserably.
This is why going forward, Nintendo can still make casual games, I'd argue that's one of their greatest strengths. But focus less on making lifestyle experiences, and instead create unique entertainment with universal appeal. Rhythm Heaven is a good example of where Nintendo should go with casual games. It feels like fun entertainment rather than some extension of life. Hell, I'd argue that they need to take inspiration from some of the business models of mobile in the future as well. Casual gamers don't want to pay $40-60 for games anymore. They rather have something they could get for either a couple dollars, or in other cases, free.
I always said Nintendo should just make games, for people who like games, and I stick by it. But casual games can be enjoyed by "core" gamers as well. I would argue Nintendo is better at making fun, and simple casual or bridge games than they are at trying to cultivate "hardcore" games, and that's a strength they need to hone for then next generation. Not that the occasional "hardcore" game isn't welcome.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: How Nintendo can more adequately appeal to today's youth

TheMisterManGuy

CM30 wrote:

And a couple more 'cool' games aimed at older audiences. Overly cute works for some series, but for others... this isn't Japan. Get over it and focus on the worldwide market.

I feel there should be a comfortable middle ground between what's "cute" and what's "cool". It doesn't have to be black and white.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: How Nintendo can more adequately appeal to today's youth

TheMisterManGuy

DefHalan wrote:

If Nintendo wanted to appeal to today's youth then then need to publish their own yearly shooter to go up against Call of Duty and Battlefield, and I don't mean Splatoon, I mean a FPS where you shoot bullets at people. Nintendo would need to stop developing so many platformers. Nintendo would need some Adventure games they can release yearly as well. The key is rapid releases, DLC support until the new one is a few months away, and aiming for those Mature-lite titles, where they are full of mature content but in the most childish ways.

Today's youth isn't playing kid-friendly games anymore, they are playing whatever is popular, whatever they hear about from friends. They are wanting the big AAA releases. In my opinion, most of today's youth is chasing the hype instead of finding good games. The youth audience Nintendo currently has is small and mostly only there because their parents are gamers themselves and actually watch what the industry puts out.

EDIT: I probably sound like I am 100 years old and completely out of touch with reality to a lot of people, but that is what I think.

They just need more diverse titles, and they need much better advertising for various demographics as well. A family-oriented brand can only survive if there's a diverse range of games.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: Should Nintendo take a more "Creator Driven" approach with it's NX games?

TheMisterManGuy

@Haru17 I'm talking mainly Nintendo's in-house teams. Not external developers like Monolith or Intelligent Systems. What I'm proposing is Nintendo's EPD division adopting a "creator driven" culture. Where you not only can tell it's a Nintendo game, but you can also distinguish the style of the individual creator/director. Plus, each designer and/or studio head at the division would have a lot of creative freedom with a lax approval process for concepts (within reason of course). Which means more new weird, off-beat IPs, ones which rethink the conventions of "Nintendo games", yet still feel distinctly Nintendo, as well as feel different from anything else on the market.

Essentially what I'm asking, is Dreamcast era-Sega style of development.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: 8th Generation = Repeat of the 5th Generation

TheMisterManGuy

Grumblevolcano wrote:

Even the reveal strategy of NX is seeming very similar to Dreamcast as there's things such as:

  • Nintendo/SEGA announcing the discontinuation of the Wii U/Saturn before the NX/Dreamcast is officially revealed.
  • NX/Dreamcast is officially revealed about 6 months before launch.
  • Wii U/Saturn is confirmed not to be Nintendo's/SEGA's future about a year before the proper unveiling of NX/Dreamcast (for Nintendo I'm considering Reggie's comments at E3 2015 rather than Iwata's comments at the DeNA event).
  • Insanely large game drought in the last 9 months of the Wii U's/Saturn's existence.

When you really think about it, Iwata era Nintendo and 90s Sega actually had a lot in common.

  • Both made a killing by deviating from the competition and going after an untapped audience
  • Struggled to keep said audience once new competition arrived,
  • Kept pissing off and confusing said audience with backwards and nonsensical business decisions
  • Lost said audience to other platforms and barely scrapping by on diehard fans
  • Now aim to rebuild their brand strength and clean up their sloppy management

There are some differences, but the similarities Wii(U)/(3)DS era Nintendo and Genesis/Saturn era Sega have are scary.

Edited on by TheMisterManGuy

TheMisterManGuy

Re: Deal-breaking Things That Would Prevent NX Purchase?

TheMisterManGuy

@Octane I agree with you on the Gamepad, it feels like that device was just slapped together to try and solve a problem that doesn't even exist. It has some great ideas behind it, but it's bloated with too much useless technology and is just way more complicated than it really should be. Whatever the NX's Gimmick is, it needs to address a problem that actually exists. The N64 analog stick solved a problem, the DS touchscreen solved a problem, the Wii Remote solved a problem, the Gamepad just creates more problems than it solves.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: Should the NX have an open development environment?

TheMisterManGuy

@CanisWolfred Shovelware is a necessary evil for any successful platform. Nearly every major successful platform in the past 20 years or so has had its fair share of shovelware. PS1, GBA, PS2, DS, Wii, Steam, iOS, Android. They all managed just fine with all the shovelware. Nintendo just has to highlight the good stuff and ignore the crap.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: How can the NX bring back the casual gamer?

TheMisterManGuy

@Bolt_Strike If you want my guess, I don't think the NX will be it's own platform at all. I think it's just a pawn in a much more ambitious plan. A unified, software OS for all future Nintendo devices that run on Tablets, set-top boxes, pocket devices, and even Smart TVs in the future. Iwata has said Nintendo wants their hardware to be like iOS, so this would make sense. "Dedicated game device" is probably just a big fancy term for an entertainment machine with games as the main draw. Iwata has also said that selling $300 proprietary game boxes that play $60 proprietary discs isn't going to cut it anymore. What predict Nintendo will do is bridge the gap between mobile and traditional gaming with their new platform.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: How can the NX bring back the casual gamer?

TheMisterManGuy

@Ultimategamer132 Eh... I don't buy it. It's an argument thrown a lot, but it's an over-simplification of the REAL issue. There was more the Wii's rise and fall than pure luck. What made the Wii a big success was it's simplicity. It lowered the barrier of entry to home gaming by ditching complex button layouts, in favor of a streamlined, friendlier interface. The whole concept of the Wii could be explained in 15 seconds or less. It set a new standard in pick up and play game design.

True casual gamers were getting tired of it late in it's life, but only because

A) The Wii was showing it's age

B) Nintendo struggled to adapt to the market in a timely fashion.

Then comes the Wii U, which tossed out everything that worked with the Wii, and replaced it with a bulky, ugly, needlessly complicated nightmare that consumers couldn't even grasp. In the casuals eyes, it was just a bad tablet add-on for their Wii. Why buy that mess, when you already have a tablet and Wii that work perfectly fine. On top of confusing name and poor design, Nintendo still expected casuals to pay $60 for games they already played. "We already have Wii Fit, why do we need another one?" All of this combined, made the Wii U a big slap in the face to those who loved the original Wii. People say casuals got bored of their Wii's and moved on to tablets, but they have no evidence to back that up.

Edited on by TheMisterManGuy

TheMisterManGuy

Re: What is your stance on rewritten localizations

TheMisterManGuy

@CM30: I don't actually mind references in Fire Emblem or Zelda if use sparingly and mixed up with other forms of humor. It only becomes a problem when the script starts relying on them with very little in terms of other jokes. Comic relief is a good thing to have in serious games since it adds breathing room to characters and makes them more enjoyable. Would you really like it if a game was soul crushingly serious at all times?

TheMisterManGuy

Re: What is your stance on rewritten localizations

TheMisterManGuy

@Ichi: That's a fair argument, and I'm not trying to say everyone who prefers subs over dubs is a closed-minded weeaboo. I'm simply saying localizations are done for a reason, not because they can. Plus, any changes made to a localization are approved by the Japanese producers, so it's not like the localization team is given free reign over everything.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: What is your stance on rewritten localizations

TheMisterManGuy

@Morpheel: Rewritten dialogue in anime still happens though not nearly to the extent that the 80s and 90s had. Most of the time when an anime is dubbed, the changes are superficial like rewritten jokes, lines, phrases and references that make more sense in to an American audience, but are unintrusive to the overall tone. It's part of the reason why English dubs are hated among weeaboos, since even if the voice acting is decent, the script changes will be very noticeable to those who have seen the subs. Yeah, people really care about that stuff.

TheMisterManGuy

Re: What do you think the NX is? (poll)

TheMisterManGuy

As unlikely as it sounds, I kind of want the NX to be an open-source video game operating system with a focus on customization. A sort of Android of video games if you will (though that's kind of unfair since Android can basically run on anything that has a screen on it in some way shape or form).

TheMisterManGuy

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