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PlywoodStick

PlywoodStick

United States

Joined:
Tue 10th June, 2014

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PlywoodStick

#1

PlywoodStick commented on Talking Point: Nintendo's Right to Take Its Ti...:

The actual confines of eShop is fun to explore, but it doesn't always give you a good idea of what's available overall.

In any case, I stand by the notion of DRM-free digital gaming, as is done by GOG.com. Steam and all of the consoles are stuck with DRM, and basically ask the user to forfeit several of their rights. This is why homebrew must continue to exist- we have the right to backup digital copies of our games for strictly personal use, and so far, only hackers have been providing that service!

If Nintendo and the other big guys won't allow us to exercise that right, then it's up to the customers to shop where your rights are respected, or if necessary, make our dissatisfaction known through counter actions. (Also buy physical, when possible- they can be traded to small businesses who make part of their living on game exchanges, since the Gamestops of the world have put many Mom and Pop game retail stores out of business!)

PlywoodStick

#2

PlywoodStick commented on Reaction: Pokémon Shuffle Isn't Quite Microtr...:

I considered buying the endgame and postgame DLC for Shin Megami Tensei 4. Then, I remembered that buying them would be supporting the concept of charging microtransactions for what should be on-disc or on-cart content. Buy the game to support the developers and publishers, yes. Buy the microtransactions to support just the publishers, no thanks.

I think the only time microtransactions are okay is when they don't affect gameplay balance and are not integral to moving the game's main progress or side stories forward, e.g. several MOBA's including DOTA 2, and certain strategy titles including Hearthstone. The most they should be able to do is save a bit of time and effort. Let's not give Pokemon the benefit of the doubt for being Pokemon- this is definitely the first step into the 4th circle, 7th canto of Dante's Inferno: Avarice.

Also, I like the Columns reference! I didn't find it or know what it was back in the Mega Drive's heyday, but I played Columns 1 on the Mega Drive Collection for PSP. :)

PlywoodStick

#4

PlywoodStick commented on Reported GameStop Memo Shows Massive Delay in ...:

These current strikes are a part of the legacy that transportation industry workers have in America, dating back to the 19th century. Goods shipment railroad workers were some of the first workers in America after the Civil War to go on strike due to abysmal pay and/or working conditions. If the people back then hadn't sacrificed their meager livelihoods (and sometimes their lives to corporate hired thugs), we wouldn't have a standard set of labor laws here, e.g. the 40 hour work week for many occupations.

This is also somewhat relevant to the working conditions of game developers, since there are no such rules or organizing of the workers allowed by big publishers in the industry. It's not uncommon to see 10-12 hour days, including weekends, and little or no additional pay over the 8 hour mark. (A well known case in point around these parts, Masahiro Sakurai. He wasn't as prolific as he is now back when he worked on Smash Bros Melee. Allegedly, he volunteered that time and effort, but how are we to know the true story?) Independent developers are a conditional exception, assuming they can land in a good spot.

In any case, I am satisfied with this reasoning for the lack of product shipments, and can only express solidarity for those affected by less than minimum wage working conditions.

PlywoodStick

#5

PlywoodStick commented on Review: Kirby and the Rainbow Curse (Wii U):

Funny thing about review scores for lesser known or played games... the original Monster Hunter was typically reviewed by professional critics a 7/10 at the highest, even though it's pretty much the same game as more recent iterations... Then, lo and behold, the users bought it, it caught on in popularity, and more people understood the mechanics. Voila! The sequels released in the USA, even though they were basically the same game with more bells and whistles, suddenly started receiving higher review scores.

Canvas Curse tended to rate higher than Rainbow Curse, because the mechanical concepts were new for the time. Now that they've laid dormant for almost 10 years... the concept isn't popular anymore, and the review score for what amounts to a revival of an older title rates lower.

I get the feeling the review score consensus among professional critics is more based upon popularity than a mix of logical objectivity and subjectivity... Although, Nintendo Life in particular doesn't seem quite as susceptible to this phenomenon. It's just my personal observation of "professional reviews" in general.

PlywoodStick

#7

PlywoodStick commented on Nintendo of America's Damon Baker Explains the...:

@Nico07 The American branch of Nintendo was founded by former President Minoru Arakawa, the husband of the daughter of former Nintendo international CEO Hiroshi Yamauchi, so that "all our base are belong to Japan!" stuff hasn't necessarily applied to Nintendo as much so as it has for Sega or Sony. :p

PlywoodStick

#8

PlywoodStick commented on Nintendo of America's Damon Baker Explains the...:

@IceClimbers I don't think that's a gaming industry exclusive issue, because the concept of planned obsolescence is a far-reaching tenet of modern industry. It would take a paradigm shift of how we produce things and operate our economies (and perhaps even of how our societies are run) to really change the underpinnings behind planned obsolescence.

Although, we as Nintendo gamers might be more resistant than the general population against planned obsolescence, since we tend to have a legacy of preserving our older consoles and games, rather than tossing them. :p Nintendo has also traditionally not been as susceptible to this as other tech companies. I think the erosion of that traditional resistance was mainly caused by the move from manufacturing products locally in the Japanese workforce over into outsourced Chinese labor; beginning sometime during 2000 with the manufacturing process of the GBA, the first Nintendo console to be produced outside their homeland.

PlywoodStick

#9

PlywoodStick commented on Nintendo of America's Damon Baker Explains the...:

@Rocky2418 That GameFAQs link is quite telling, considering Nintendo of America came to this N3DS conclusion based off of their own data! However, it is a .jp link... and the data report goes all the way back to 1998. To me, that suggests the data was gathered and prepared primarily by Japanese branch employees.

I suspect that Nintendo of Japan was ready and willing to make smaller N3DS units available for North America, but someone making the decisions for the American branch didn't want to go along with it for some unknown internal structuring and politics reasoning. This couldn't just be caused by some marketing misunderstandings...

PlywoodStick

#10

PlywoodStick commented on Nintendo of America's Damon Baker Explains the...:

Well, I guess technically the old 3DS is still an option if you like doing your own electronics repairs (I've already replaced the R button circuit attachment on my own), adding 3rd party devices (such as the best battery life for any Nintendo portable console), and are interested in the modding scene... If they're going to throw the elder and it's lessons into the refuse bin, then it will be picked back up by those who still care about it, and reformed in ways that run counter to their current path.

I've already taken almost 3.5 million steps with my vanilla 3DS... it broke my fall when I slipped once, and has survived through my treks during inclement weather, among other events. Why would I give it up for some young, pretty thing after all of that? And how much further will it go, I wonder?

PlywoodStick

#11

PlywoodStick commented on Nintendo of America's Damon Baker Explains the...:

@Syrek24 The issue here in my eyes is not about the products themselves. It is more about Nintendo's ingrained corporate PR tactics and feedback integration, both of which sometimes contradicts on the ground reports from end users, including this case. Not that the dismissal of outside information or dissent is surprising coming from any corporation- that's just a fact of life.

I'm really just more disappointed that "The Treehouse of Nintendo of America", which 20-30 years ago more closely resembled a small business in operating procedures, built upon the backs of people pushing around Donkey Kong arcade cabinets, has been bulldozed in favor of "The Skyscraper of Nintendo of America", so to speak. This is not the behavior of the small American branch of Nintendo I grew up admiring. This is closer to the behavior of an Apple or Microsoft.

PlywoodStick

#12

PlywoodStick commented on Card Format amiibo Confirmed to be Heading our...:

Well, the "sales ranking" results are to be expected when you limit quantity of certain figures moreso than others... :p So, of course you're not going to see an exclusive shop's character up there, even if the demand were high enough to ensure it... It's a rather pointless chart.

The sell-through rankings are more interesting, if their meaning is how quickly individual figure models sell out. Again, though, varying quantities of stock for individual models skews the results of this chart, making it a somewhat less clear indicator than if every amiibo were shipped in at least nearly equal numbers.

For example, in my local Gamestops, Bowsers languish on the shelves, while Shulks were sold out by preorder 1-2 weeks ahead of time. Not to menion, a stock of 15-20 Bowsers for a single store, compared to closer to 5-10 Shulks, combined with the Xenoblade exclusivity, creates a recipe for no Shulks to ever be seen on Gamestop store shelves throughout this region of the USA.

PlywoodStick

#13

PlywoodStick commented on Card Format amiibo Confirmed to be Heading our...:

Cards are a good counter to the current situation for several reasons:

1. Not everyone is going to be fortunate enough to find the figure they want. One can say, "They're useless!" or "They're no fun!" only because they happened to either be fortunate enough to acquire their choice, or spent an amount of time and effort on finding them that would be more appropriate for something that is not being mass produced.

2. Unlike most digital DLC, one can actually share these cards with others, so you don't have to buy the same digital DLC multiple times for everyone. Having physical ownership of the means of DLC has pros and cons, but it ensures you actually own that copy of the delivery medium, rather than being licensed it, so it cannot be suddenly taken from you by a gaming related company for arbitrary legal reasons.

3. They're economical. Not everyone has spare money vaults to burn on collecting these things, so the cards are plainly more accessible. Besides, not everyone has physical storage to keep all of these figures. The matter of economics also raises the question of why anyone would pay $30 and upwards for DLC that may, for all we know, be worth less than $5.

4. It's more environmentally friendly to produce millions of cards, even if the paper printer company still uses outdated and toxic methods of producing them, than to manufacture millions of PVC figures. Polyvinyl chloride is one of the most toxic consumer product materials to work with, recycle, and allow to leach out in trash dumps; we should be abolishing the use of PVC, not encouraging it.

5. Nintendo was once a Hanafuda card company, so this is another way to continue carrying on that tradition. A physical representation and record of tradition is arguably more meaningful than something that is purely digital, of which is without any physical legacy to share or leave behind for future generations. (Yes, Nintendo has some history as a toy company, but compared to their contemporaries, Nintendo more closely identifies with quirky Gunpei Yokoi style gizmos like the Ultra Hand, rather than with the ever popular action figure.)

So... yeah, this is a good move.

PlywoodStick

#14

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Are You An Early Adopter With The New Ni...:

@NodesforNoids "DSi style cash grab"

That's comparing apples to oranges. Also, I'd probably take a Majora's Mask over a Luigi's Mansion and a Monster Hunter over an Animal Crossing, myself...

"Vita that has the power to weather the game 'drought' and isn't region locked"

The power that the Vita has is to be ironic, given it's name, "Life", even though it was half-dead out of the gate, and has limped into Life... I mean Vita Support mode... There's no drought in Japan, so having no region lock is a necessity for avid Vita owners.

PlywoodStick

#16

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Are You An Early Adopter With The New Ni...:

@Hotfusion To be fair, most of America is still stuck in 2003 mode as far as our wireless and internet connections are concerned... 22-27 MBPS internet speed is the average, and most people don't use any more than what Wireless 802.11g offers. Nintendo isn't the only one behind the tech times, only a few places outside of eastern Asia are really making use of Wireless 802.11n 300 MBPS or better right now, even with the release of Wireless 802.11ac...

PlywoodStick

#17

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Are You An Early Adopter With The New Ni...:

I don't have any plans to get the new New 3DS (LOL at Nintendo's naming conventions), for various reasons...

But if I did, it would be for the more stable 3D, improved screens, improved 3D functionality in the camera, and other improved 3D features in apps like the web browser. Yes, contrary to popular opinion, I like the 3D features, and I really liked the original ideas the 3DS started out with. For example, Steel Diver featured a choice of either using the built-in speakers as a substitute for positional force feedback/rumble, or using headphones for pseudo-surround environmental awareness, both of which were complemented by the 3D visuals. (Unfortunately, on the other hand, it seems like the New 3DS is also a Vampiric system, since direct sunlight is it's bane.)

It's a shame, it seems to be a recurring trend that Nintendo's original ideas are not consistently built upon. This is exemplified by the software impetus by which people are buying the New 3DS- an enhanced remake (of a great title that had original ideas back in 2000), a sequel that is mostly similar to all of it's (very good) predecessors, and a retailed update patch of a (merely decent) title in a series that has lost the pedigree it once held back in the 00's. Convention is the murderer of Innovation.

PlywoodStick

#18

PlywoodStick commented on 3DS Flashcard Users Playing ROMs Online Report...:

@SKTTR "You stinky, FILTHY pirates! Those developers got a job to do and lives to feed, just like the hundred thousand breeding and cutting swine for you.

Get faced with it & Pay for it!"

Lol, I laughed when I imagined that being said by a belligerent queen's voice.

PlywoodStick

#19

PlywoodStick commented on 3DS Flashcard Users Playing ROMs Online Report...:

@Arehexes "Wasn't the DVD playback blocked cause Nintendo didn't want to pay the money for the licensing?"

That's possible. Although, it is interesting to note that contrary to the Gamecube, it would seem there was a point when Nintendo's engineers intended the Wii to offer DVD playback. Otherwise, the disc drive would not be natively capable of playing DVD's with softmods.

"And hell Sony locked down the speed of the psp in their games for I think was a power saving method."

That does seem to be the case, but the default speed still messed with the code on some of their games. (e.g. Final Fantasy Tactics: War of the Lions had lots of slowdown, but softmod patching the game's code to calibrate properly, instead of with the default speed, fixes the problem.)

"Dude I was shocked a Nintendo DS could play media back via a flash cart."

I'm still amazed that the GBA was able to play back almost an hour of video in a single cart, even if it is low resolution.

"A lot of things people do with hacking these systems dwarfs just piracy as a "feature", but people seem to be self righteous and feel like blanket shaming anyone who has a magic battery."

Yeah, and the irony of that self-righteousness is that it doesn't even serve them. I never got around to making a magic battery, I've just been using softmod methods. I'd like to try that magic battery project some day, though! I'd also like to replace the ancient antenna in the PSP, so it can be a radio!

"But hey how many of you played Mother 3? And to those that said yes how many used the patch? And if you said yes and don't have the jp cart then you have no room to judge here."

Yep, pretty much, I bet there's some guilty people here... I wouldn't do that, though... COUGH...

PlywoodStick

#20

PlywoodStick commented on 3DS Flashcard Users Playing ROMs Online Report...:

"Nintendo's activities in targeting those playing illegal ROMs appears to have stepped up to assessing online sessions... In over ten cases the trends match up - they've been playing ROM copies of games online, and now they've lost the ability to play any game online, legal or otherwise."

This would not only entail accessing online sessions, because if that were all Nintendo was doing, it would be easy enough for the end user to spoof their connection. How would one know the end user is on a flash cart if the data stream being sent has been programmed to be the same as an official cart?

If this is the case, then this alludes to Nintendo directly and covertly accessing end users' personal machines, then injecting code to intercept the end users' connection. Either the code just records the end users' settings and credentials, then leaves the end users' system, or... it sticks around on the end users' machine, acting as a form of malware.

If the former is the case, then it's reminiscent of tracker software that is so often used these days in advertising and security (e.g. Google Analytics, various research beacons, spiders, etc). If the latter is the case, then... I think that could potentially be grounds for legal action, based on directly tampering with an end users' property.

I'm not sure which of the two is the case, but I hope for the sake of the workers at Nintendo it is the former, since that method is a legal option to track their end users, even if it is not necessarily morally just. The latter would have more dire implications...

PlywoodStick

#21

PlywoodStick commented on 3DS Flashcard Users Playing ROMs Online Report...:

@TingLz You wouldn't happen to have stocks in Nintendo, would you? Their survival is their responsibility, not yours.

I don't agree with the use of flash carts for pirating, either, but if modding my Wii and PSP has taught me anything, it is that these companies purposely do not unlock the full potential of their consoles. Who would have known the Wii's disc drive was fully capable of playing DVD movies, but Nintendo disabled access to the feature somewhere along the way for some arbitrary reason? Who would have known that the PSP was more of a multimedia powerhouse than it seemed at first, during a time predating smartphones? There have been some amazing stuff produced by independently operating people over time.

We're heading towards a more connected world, and shutting down people who do awesome stuff that doesn't necessarily agree with corporate policy isn't going to do much good in the future. Not everyone is in it for the money.

PlywoodStick

#22

PlywoodStick commented on 3DS Flashcard Users Playing ROMs Online Report...:

@Jayvir "Even if you own the original cart, you are not entitled to backups. It's piracy either way."

No, that's not piracy. The right to backup personal copies of games one buys is one of the tenets of DRM-free policy. It is also one of the tenets of copyleft, and open source projects. Many modern companies simply choose to reject those policies, even though it is viable to become DRM-free. (One example of a modern company that does, in fact, explicitly state that the customers do and should have the right to backup their games for personal use is GoG.com.)

The only reason why we, the customers, would not be guaranteed the right to back up our files is because of the dodgy legal jargon in Terms of Use Agreements, many of which often attempt to circumvent other ownership laws, including the USA's First Sale Doctrine. (Also including some prominent ones in the EU, of which do in fact state the right to back up personal copies of digital files. Those laws might not necessarily apply in the UK, but those laws do apply in Germany or Poland, for example.)

The most effective way to dissolve the rights of the people is to act as if we have none at all. Hand-outs and Entitlements are not the same thing as Hand-ups and Rights.

PlywoodStick

#23

PlywoodStick commented on Guide: How to Complete a System Transfer from ...:

@CB85 Nope, as long as you haven't used more than what that 16GB requires, it's fine. Just keep in mind that when you do an SD or miniSD transfer to microSD, you may only keep certain downloads (e.g. Streetpass) and game save data, so you may need to download your games from the eShop again.

PlywoodStick

#26

PlywoodStick commented on Guide: How to Complete a System Transfer from ...:

@JaxonH Over on the east coast, especially around Washington, D.C., Comcast rules a lot of the telecommunications territory around here. My current MBps is about 22 MB/s (which is about the national average according to independent speed testing sources), and the average for those with Comcast is around 27 MBps. That being said, Comcast is notorious for rampantly imposing bandwidth throttling without the consent or knowledge of the customer. Most of America has really, REALLY crappy internet service compared to other highly industrialized nations, with many places having no alternatives to the current monopolies. (Until government-run or Google fiber optics are laid...)

PlywoodStick

#27

PlywoodStick commented on Guide: How to Complete a System Transfer from ...:

@deKay That's exactly what I want to do, and then some. It would also be tedious if every time I wanted to change up my music files in the Music app, or pull off a document from the root folder, I had to reach for a screwdriver. (Remember, the more stuff you put onto the 3DS, the longer certain apps take to load, long before the data storage cap is reached.) Not to mention, I have taken 100's of pictures with the 3DS... ever tried deleting 100's of bad/obsolete photos in the 3DS Camera App? I certainly wouldn't, so a computer is needed to sift through them.

Even these are just a few of several examples in my case. I'm kind of OCD when it comes to things like this, enough so that this is one of the dealbreakers for me to not get the New 3DS and just stick with my 4 year old one.

PlywoodStick

#28

PlywoodStick commented on Weirdness: These Nifty 8-bit Super Mario Colle...:

Oh no no no, I would never buy canned coffee. I only buy it fair trade, fresh in a pouch, and hopefully full bean so I can manually grind it later into a pot to brew "cowboy style." (The longer the time has passed since a coffee bean has been ground, the more their flavor and nutrients will have deteriorated.) That is (IMO) the best way to experience coffee- Fresh is good, fresh with good conscience and superb natural sweetness without artificial flavoring or overheating is even better!

PlywoodStick

#30

PlywoodStick commented on Guide: How to Complete a System Transfer from ...:

Oh, it does say "SD or mini SD" versus "micro SD", so it may be something one glosses over if one reads too quickly. Certainly, it's something that someone who is not tech savvy might not be keen about. The instructions all make perfect sense to me. If you don't know the difference between mini and micro... well... micro is smaller than mini. I'm pretty sure that's taught in high school geometry...

PlywoodStick

#31

PlywoodStick commented on Guide: How to Complete a System Transfer from ...:

Oh, I didn't know one has to open the back plate to get to the SD card... Scratch that, I'll stick with my old 3DS. I want to be able to take out the SD card on a whim, just like with any other digital device that has offered memory card support over the past 10 years...

PlywoodStick

#32

PlywoodStick commented on Reaction: Super Smash Bros. amiibo Support Sho...:

Nah, I just see amiibo as another in the long lineage of Nintendo creating some device or another linking their home and portable consoles together. The Super NES and Game Boy had the Super Game Boy; the N64 and GB/GBC had the N64 Transfer Pak; the GCN and GBA had the GCN/GBA link cable and related software capabilities; the Wii and DS/DSi had WiFi connectivity features and software; and the Wii U and 3DS have amiibo and Mii sharing.

Cross platform features are not a new path forward for Nintendo. If anything, amiibo is the next step on the path they've already been taking for over 20 years now.

PlywoodStick

#33

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Do Video Game Reviews Need To Have A Score?:

I voted for Eurogamer's new scale... At this point, after all these years of seeing various arbitrary interpretations of numerical number grades/scores, I personally find review score numbers to not be useful for determining the actual content and quality of a game. I'm more interested in reading a summary, conclusion, or synopsis if I want a quick look at a game review, before reading it in full.

I grew up with the Gamepro magazine grading system- It used an alternate version of a 10 point grading scale (0.5-5.0). Instead of assigning a single grade to a game outright, they chose to give ratings to individual aspects of a game (i.e. Graphics, Sound, Controls, and Fun Factor), and an image of a facial expression to accompany the score. For example, a 3.0 would show a smiling head, a 3.5 would show a smiling head with a thumbs up, a 1.0 would show a head frowning with two thumbs down, and a 5.0 would have an ecstatic head that looked like it got a jolt of static electricity, making their hair stand on end. The numerical grades/scores correlated to these expressions- in theory, these emotions were the true descriptors of how the reviewer felt about certain aspects of a game, not the numbers themselves. They could have very well done away with the numbers, and been no lesser for it- the numbers existed merely to follow the 1990s trend of professional gaming journalism affixing a rating to their industry's products in the same way other media did for their product ratings; a trend which has continued to survive to this day.

I think there is a good lesson to be learned there- a numerical grade/score indicates a mathematical concept, a percentage of correct or acceptable answers; as is often used in schools. A display of clearly described emotion, on the other hand, is a universal measure of how someone feels and thinks about something; it can be used anywhere, not just in an academic setting. Using numerical grades/scores for an art form or game doesn't really make logical sense, because their qualities cannot be summed up by a boolean or absolute mathematical value. It's just an abstract value born from past trends of trying to draw media rating systems using traditional school grading systems, even though the two are not necessarily correlated.

A descriptor of how someone feels about a game at the end of a review could easily replace any numerical value; just as Gamepro's use of a glowing, happy face, with mouth grinning wide, and two thumbs up, could have easily replaced a "9/10".

PlywoodStick

#34

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Which Nintendo Franchises Should be Prod...:

@AugustusOxy Not only that, Spirits Within was the poster child for proving how live action or "animated like live action" video game movies can be a very, VERY bad idea, even if it sounds cool: Squaresoft lost a ton of money as a result and couldn't made it back, putting them into debt. That movie is cited as being one of the primary reasons why Squaresoft merged with Enix, while completely screwing up the organization of Square's game studios; thus signaling the beginning of Square's fall from grace.

Nintendo would be wise to heed this important piece of gaming history. Allowing budgets to go out of control for the sake of making "the coolest thing ever" is a startlingly real possibility with projects like that.

PlywoodStick

#36

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Which Nintendo Franchises Should be Prod...:

I think an experimental animation for Splatoon combining elements in the veins of film noir and cel shaded films, such as "Renaissance", a French black and white cel shaded animation, while adding bright splashes of color to liquids and bullets (including the squid inks and "blood") would make for a visually arresting and uniquely flowing military/tactical/mystery series.

PlywoodStick

#39

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Which Nintendo Franchises Should be Prod...:

As others have said, a proper Fire Emblem anime would be amazing, especially if it were handled similarly to political classics such as "Legend of the Galactic Heroes" or "Monster." (Although, of course, with more battles and less exposition.)

PlywoodStick

#40

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Which Nintendo Franchises Should be Prod...:

The idea of Metroid Live Action in the vein of Star Wars, Star Trek, or Stargate might be interesting, but it would be VERY expensive... I'm not sure if Nintendo should be pursuing all these possible live action ventures, I think that even hiring an animation studio willing to experiment on unusual crazy ideas for a series would be less risky than a live action movie or series...

Don't get me wrong, a live action Metroid would be awesome, but TV series are not cheap to create or air, and I'm not confident a Metroid movie would gross enough to recoup costs...

PlywoodStick

#41

PlywoodStick commented on Poll: Which Nintendo Franchises Should be Prod...:

LOL a live action Kirby would probably make a good horror movie, like The Blob or The Thing, because the victim would go, "OH GOD NO PLEASE NO AAAAAAH" while Kirby sucks in whole and eats them alive instantly. All the while, Kirby would have a dead shark stare, while grinning widely and saying "Hiiiii!" when the next victim is met!

"Kirby, the Popstar of Serial Killers"

PlywoodStick

#42

PlywoodStick commented on Satoru Iwata Reiterates Plans for Quality of L...:

@Savino I wouldn't be surprised if the 9th generation of consoles is the last one for home consoles, with progress carried on by portable consoles. It's not just Nintendo, the entire home console market has contracted big time. The rapid growth gravy train has already reached it's final stop.

PlywoodStick

#43

PlywoodStick commented on Satoru Iwata Reiterates Plans for Quality of L...:

@Kyosaii @Omenapoika @StarDust4Ever I was just thinking about that. The only way this would work is if one gear is positioned into the middle, ensuring only one is directing the rotation of the other gears. (One on the left would rotate clockwise, one on the right and in the center would rotate counterclockwise, or vice versa. Clockwise symbolizes moving forward, counterclockwise symbolizes slowing down or moving backwards. Thus, either the left or right gear would be prioritized.) When there are only two gears/pillars, (Game Software/Hardware) it doesn't matter, because they complement each other in a Yin/Yang fashion. Add in a third one, though... And we're forced to ponder the question:

"Which one of these gears/pillars is the one directing the others?"

Traditionally, the answer would be Game Hardware. As for the future... who knows?

PlywoodStick

#46

PlywoodStick commented on Live-Action Netflix Series For The Legend of Z...:

@Kage_88 Even with expansion, the same mythological themes in the games are often present in other (usually Japanese created) media, as well. For example, the Super Mario Adventures and Link to the Past manga, created for Nintendo Power, felt natural in their progression from the base material of the games into worlds we had not yet been really exposed to. They successfully created new plots, themes, and character personae that complimented their origins, yet went beyond what we might expect. The manga creators didn't make the mistake of going out of their way to make Miyamoto's creations into something they're not, because they understood the base material and their underlying criteria.

There's nothing wrong with expansion, but it's very much worth evaluating how exactly it's done. It would be foolhardy to just try any idea that comes along, just because it sounds good and the people making the proposition seem passionate. That's not enough. There needs to be a unifying focus behind the projects, an understanding of what makes them tick.

PlywoodStick

#47

PlywoodStick commented on Live-Action Netflix Series For The Legend of Z...:

@freaksloan Political ideology by itself has nothing to do with personal etiquette or issues. That whole idea is snake oil that is being sold to twist people's minds into thinking a certain way about other people. It's just another way to divide different people, an action which mostly only serves the political elites.

Coincidentally, that sort of behavior is present in Game of Thrones... I think the point of displaying that kind of behavior in an art form such as Game of Thrones is to remind us of our past mistakes.

PlywoodStick

#48

PlywoodStick commented on Live-Action Netflix Series For The Legend of Z...:

@nf_2 @ToneDeath SPOILERS

SPOILERS

If they did do a Fire Emblem series, I think FE4 and FE5 would make the best candidates: Geneology of the Holy War, and Thracia 776. That whole Jugdral chronology is much more blunt and brutal than any other continental series in Fire Emblem. It also actually includes political intrigue, rape, genocide, incest, slavery, child murder, corruption, and the annihilation of your entire army- all events which much more closely match the tone of Game of Thrones than any other chronology in Fire Emblem.

As such, the Jugdral chronology would be the best candidate for a Game of Thrones type of live action Nintendo series.

PlywoodStick

#49

PlywoodStick commented on Live-Action Netflix Series For The Legend of Z...:

Fire Emblem is closer to Game of Thrones than Zelda, but it's more somewhere in between the two. It still doesn't really match the tone of Game of Thrones, even at it's worst, because the core themes are very much rooted in mythology and mythological terms- just as the Zelda series is. That is something which has to be understood, to grasp what differentiates a more dirty, "realistic" fantasy like King of Thrones, and a more bold, metaphorical fantasy like Fire Emblem.

PlywoodStick

#50

PlywoodStick commented on Live-Action Netflix Series For The Legend of Z...:

"In terms of tone, it's supposedly aiming to be like a Game of Thrones for a family audience"

No, no, no.... Just... no...

The two series are completely different from each other- it's not a matter of "oh, this one is light-hearted family fun, and this one is decidedly more gritty and adult in tone." Their themes and settings are completely different.

The Legend of Zelda series is very much rooted within and revolves around mythology. Despite all of the pseudo-European architectural and cultural aesthetics, including castle towns and pseudo-European villages, the setting of each entry is not based solely upon the visible aethetics. They are built as part of a saga that spans eons- a presentation that has more in common with chronicling ancient Chinese, Buddhist, or Hindu epics than with medieval European political intrigue, within troughs and concrete walls.

Every entry (except Majora's Mask) has a relatively cheery outlook- even the post-apocalyptic setting of Wind Waker is surprisingly warm-hearted and bold. The tone and setting come together to form an almost ethereal bond, which to an Earthen human seems too fantastical and wild to be considered even remotely realistic.

Game of Thrones has none of those things. It is more based upon a fantasy version of medieval European history than any kind of mythology. (Unless you count the shadowy cults, which have their own founding in the ancient underground cults of yore on Earth.) Even by itself, that is a huge breaking point in tone.

Beyond that, there is literally no political intrigue at all in The Legend of Zelda series. All of the nasty behavior, backstabbing, short-lived, opportunistic alliances, and constant conflict and war, all characteristics which are closely linked to the history of medieval Europe, are largely missing from Zelda. That is not just because those themes are too "mature" for a wider audience, but also because they are not compatible with the... ideology, if you will, of the series. Anything resembling those themes in Zelda have historically been made into little more than mere footnotes, whereas Game of Thrones spends most of it's time concentrating on those themes.

If these live action movie creators really can not tell the difference between the defining settings, core themes, and unifying focal ideology behind each of these series, then they really are better off not touching it at all. Zelda is anything but compatible with the concept of "a family audience version of King of Thrones."