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Maxime

Maxime

Canada

Joined:
Tue 16th June, 2009

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Maxime

#3

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

Thanks Saxophoneoftime. Your praise means a lot to us.

Even being part of the PMBR, I was hyped when Roy was shown off publicly for the first time. I had been keeping the secret for months, wanting to play him against people other than just my closest friends, XD.

Maxime

#4

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

TheItalianBaptist: The Castlevania stage in kind of a gray area, but we know that Konami has a history of being more tolerant about user-created content. If it so happens that they wish for us to take it out, we can always reskin it.

I'm actually pretty sure that Nintendo knows about Project M. They've been reacting to its mention on Miiverse, in fact. The fact that they let it exist for so long means that they won't do anything to remove it.

Nintendo_Ninja: I respect that some like Brawl. My reason for nto being as enthralled with it was because that it felt rather sluggish to me. Moves were slower and advanced technique were removed one by one. Balance was pretty abysmal, where the difference between the to and worse character in the game was wider than in Melee and Smash 64. It also had a lot of glitches, some that permanently messed up save files and music for example (we fixed these problems, so you can't get these permanent problems with Project M).

I,m not exactly sure I agree with competitive gaming not taking some physical toll. You play for an extensive period of time, and the average high level smash player makes around 7 inputs a second. It requires peak concentration levels, and over long periods of playing, your sense can begin to dull, and your ability to take pressure is tested. There are players who react better to pressure, and who are better at maintaining and managing their energy. Mental condition is also tied to your physical condition. At least, that is my personal experience.

Maxime

#5

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

Thanks buddy, thought he main AI guys are Bero and KingClubber, I'll tell relay your words to them. They really don't get the praise they deserve sometimes. They're amazing.

Also, thank you for supporting us. I know it might sound like I'm just doing PR to look good, but it really is a big motivator for us to know people are enjoying the game. :)

Maxime

#6

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

Arizona huh? I don't travel much for tourneys anymore, but if we ever meet, don't be shy and say hello, WolfManZylo.

On the other topic:

And as Senario said, highly skilled fighting game players will never lose to an unexperienced player, even on a bad day (although to slightly worse players, but in the same league that could happen).

Still, the point is that some people find enjoyment at getting better at the game. By competing with other players, they can gauge how much they've improved. I have rivals that are a bit better than I. When I get closer to or simply defeat them, I feel good about my achievement. If I lost, I still had fun and learned a lot from it.

I'm sure you're also having fun playing the game in a more party-ish manner. I personally like playing a bit of both ways.

Maxime

#7

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

It's pretty much what we're aiming for, WolfManZylo (great story BTW!).

We wanted to provide an alternative so that everyone would be happy. By the way, have I seen you around the PM forums?

I'm Vigilante, the Roy main from Quebec :)

Maxime

#8

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

Not to burst your bubble or anything, but there are many skills involved in video games as an e-sport. Honing your reflexes, reads, improving your game knowledge, being able to anticipate several moves ahead, etc...

The fact that someone who practiced for a long time will almost always win against someone who did not... yeah, at both high, medium and low levels, there is skill involved.

As long as there's the concept of "mastery" and the ability to "improve", by definition, skill is factor. Unless you would say you have not improved since you first picked up a controller. I'm pretty sure that my brother who has never been into video games has never even come close to beating me, personally. Cool dude, just not his thing.

Maxime

#9

Maxime commented on Feature: How A Team Of Dedicated Fans Is Fixin...:

Love the article, but I want to address some of the backlash.

Nowhere in this article did we ever say that we were "fixing" Brawl. We did not choose that word choice, the writers did. The people who like Brawl can continue playing Brawl. There is nothing inherently wrong with this. In fact, there are a few in the backroom who play both game, or even Melee, Brawl, Project M and Smash 64 equally.

Some of us do not come from the competitive scene, but have skills they can contribute to the project. There are also a small subset of competitive Brawl players who have begun to share their ideas with us and even join our ranks.

For those asking whether this is legal, we need to differentiate between modding and piracy. Piracy is stealing someone else's property, something we do not endorse. Modding is modifying an existing product, not profiting from it. We offer patch files to play the game differently, but ultimately, you need an original copy of the game to play it in the ways we distribute the files. Game Genie left a court precedent about gaming modifications, rendering the act of modding video games legal. We've heavily researched this because we love and respect Nintendo and want to stay on their good side.

FInally, remember that this is our policy: "We truly believe in the creed that there isn't a right way to play Super Smash Bros., only a way that is right for you." We strongly believe in this.

We've made great strides to add content for both competitive and non-competitive players, even adding a new item, the turbo booster. Competitive players want to have fun as well, but their way of having fun may be different from yours. Having options to choose how to experience that fun is what makes smash a truly inclusive experience. Some people like to play Free for all with all items on high, others like to play neutral stages like Battlefield and Smashville with no items. Some want a more chaotic party experience, some want a more direct test of abilities. There's really no superior way to be a smasher, and sometimes that competitive smasher will want to play an items match as a change of pace. The key element here is that you're having fun, and instead of either side wishing for the other to burn, I think that it is better as a community if we can instead support each other. I really don't get the whole competitive gamer hate that people direct toward me on a constant basis. I mean, I'm fine with people playing differently than me, I even play items matches if people are so inclined. I get a lot of hate when I'm being warm and polite. There's this sort of angry knee jerk reaction when I say that I participate in Project M (and formerly participated in Melee) tournaments. I think I'm speaking for the average tourney people here when I say that in general, we're pretty cool dudes. Of course, the jerks are those that get remembered the most, but they are just a very vocal minority. Believe me, I slap my forehead every time I see someone making fun of party smashers. It's immature and stupid. With this in mind, while it is unfair for competitive gamers to be jerks, I'm not sure it's entirely fair to label us all as elitists. There's good and bad people in every scene. There are elitist tourney goers, just as there are cool, laid back people in that scene. On the other hand, there are cool, tolerant party smashers, just as there are equally elitist party smashers who would tell us that we're playing the game wrong when really... we're just playing it in a way that best suits our sensibilities. The idea is mutual acceptance. Smash can be played both ways, no camp is hurting the other. On the contrary, the series benefits from this versatility.

I also avoid the use of the word "casual" to describe party smashers, because who can be very into smashing non-competitively. I think this is a misnomer.

I also wouldn't consider the M in Project M to mean "Melee". While it is a heavy influence, we've made some departures from Melee, improving some of its weaker aspects. While Brawl's balance has some issues, so did Melee. No game is perfect, and that includes our own. We can only strive to get better with playtester and community feedback.

Anyhow, please try Project M if you have a chance. We take every and all feedback. With balance shaping up, we have been looking into improving party elements and aesthetics. The reason I wrote this long-winded post is because I feel that these things needed to be said.

  • Vigilante, PMBR.
Maxime

#10

Maxime commented on Review: Super Smash Bros. (Virtual Console / N...:

If I were to rate each game in order, I'd say Super Smash Bros. Melee would come out on top.

The Melee battle system is faster, more intuitive and for a fighting game, it is important that each well-timed button press be followed by a prompt response. It is much more engaging.

Although Brawl has incredible content, and an all-out better one-player mode, the battle system is much slower. An actions takes nearly an entire second to occur after you press the button. Although some players don't notice, players that were good in Melee notice how severe this lag has become. Brawl also houses many annoying features that cannot be turned off; for instances, tripping on the floor randomly and lack of decent short jumps and fast-falling. Because I beleive a battle system is more important than the content of a fighting game, I rate Brawl as the worse of all three.

Smash 64 is slow, but dodging is fast enough to be of good use, unlike in Brawl where dodging could actually get you in trouble because the balance of dodging speed was not much faster in relations to how fast you could recover from an attack. Also, I take into acxcount the N64's processing capabilities, which made it impossible for it to handle a game as fast-paced as Melee. Back in the N64 days, it could be considered speedy.

The original has the best level design; simple and fun (even without a flat Final destination for multilpayer). To me, it comes second to Melee.

So:

1st: Melee, for superior battle system.
2nd: Original, for better level design.
Last: Brawl: For random occurrences and poor battle system (But good content).

Those are my personal rankings.