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Galenmereth

Galenmereth

Norway

Joined:
Sun 24th March, 2013

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Galenmereth

#3

Galenmereth commented on Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS Demo Smashe...:

I would have liked to have the unique 3DS modes playable in the demo: I'm not getting the 3DS version for multiplayer, since I want the Wii U one for that. So this isn't really convincing me to buy the 3DS version, since none of my friends are going to bother with it anyway.

Galenmereth

#5

Galenmereth commented on Review: Hyrule Warriors (Wii U):

"This sentiment carries over to the music, which is made up of classic Zelda tunes which have been mercilessly butchered by Omega Force's in-house musicians."

Yeah no thanks.

Galenmereth

#8

Galenmereth commented on New Nintendo 3DS Models Announced:

@Vrael It's not a new console, it's just an incremental upgrade, yet it is released for full price.

While the same can be said for mobile gaming — a new iPhone released roughly every year — keep in mind that the asking price for software in mobile gaming is way too low to produce quality products like dedicated hardware gets. This is the problem. This sets a very bad precedent.

Galenmereth

#9

Galenmereth commented on New Nintendo 3DS Models Announced:

This would be perfectly fine if it wasn't for the fact that the "new" 3DS is only a slight upgrade from the old models in terms of CPU and "power". While this was the same for the DSi, the DSi didn't have exclusive retail games. I really don't like this development.

Galenmereth

#13

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

I don't understand why women wear stiletto heels. They're scientifically proven to be bad for your feet and your back, they're painful, and you set yourself up for serious foot injury the higher the heels get if you step wrong. And yet, women decide to wear these things — despite all the warnings — every single day. My ex did, and I tried talking her out of it, because I see them as torture devices.

So tell me, then: why are stiletto heels such an issue, when women wear them, buy them, and enjoy them? We all know /why/ women wear them: it is to look good. It makes you taller, it makes your butt more perky, and if used by someone who have trained to walk with them, it can look elegant (although it often does not...) Are we trying to say that women using stiletto heels are demeaning themselves? That you cannot want to look good and also be independent and strong? Seriously? That's sexism on the same level as saying men with muscles are stupid.

Galenmereth

#14

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

@Yorumi Isn't it attacking people by proxy you're annoyed by? People that align themselves with a group cannot claim personal attack when it is the opinions of the group that is attacked.

I read the article. But Samus' new attire in SSB is the spearhead of the argument — "look at what Nintendo is doing with Samus". I agree Other M was manchauvenistic piece of garbage — at least based on cutscenes, I never did play it. But the article talks about her visual appearence being demeaning, or sexualized, and her being objectified. Which is wrong.

I'm also not hiding behind anything: I did directly say that many social justice warriors make issues out of non issues. I stand by that. And I see nothing wrong in questioning a group's motives, when it directly correlates with the discussed topic. And make no mistake that this whole spectacle on women in games is used by some individuals as marketing for their own brand. It's a hot topic. It sells games, it pulls article clicks.

The target I paint with the term social justice warriors are for people that take the act of judging and serving justice into their own hands. Because that's what it means. People bullying those that do not conform to their own ideas and principles. I'm not saying the writer of this article is among these people: but the narrative is certainly narrated by such figures. Recent controversies over the past week ought to make you, too, question their motives.

Galenmereth

#15

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

@Yorumi: Except I do not do what they do. I am not saying their arguments are invalid because of who they are, I'm making a statement about their agenda. What is the point in me repeating the great arguments on this already found and made here in these comments? I'd rather supplement them by adding that a lot of the basis for these arguments is without good reason. Like stated elsewhere, women wear training outfits when they exercise, like men do. What Samus wears is not demeaning: it's perfectly tasteful. Words like objectification are thrown around with no regard for their actual meaning. Samus would be objectified if her purpose in the game was only to be an object of sexual reference and fanservice. But she is a fighter, as powerful as any of the others — male, female or dinosaur — and she wears a sports attire. Like Little Mac.

Believe it or not, but most women do not feel bad about dressing attractively. It's not a shameful act that demeans their person. It's freedom of expression, and the majority dress in a way that makes them feel good by choice. for some that's "skimpy", for others it's more muted. But let's not make an issue out of a fictional character looking attractive while performing martial arts and kicking ass.

Galenmereth

#16

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

@Yorumi: "You're making broad generalizations about a diverse group of people making statements that are absolutely unprovable." Which is precisely what a lot of people in said group of people also do, but the other way. I cannot count the number of times I've been told my opinions are worthless because I am male. If I am male, by default I am part of the patriarchy, and unless I agree 100%, I am a misogynistic apologist. The term sexism going both ways is apparently irrelevant, because due to men ruling the world, men cannot discuss the oppression of women. That is an ad hominem attack based on gender. And this is why I specified one group of people — the social justice warriors. When social justice turns to bullying those who have a different opinion, is it still justice? Most of the arguments thrown around are not based on research, and so we are discussing subjective opinions. For all the people offended by Samus' new training attire, all the people that do not care are silent. They are the majority. The majority of women do not care one iota about how women are portrayed in video games. This is conjecture and I don't have a specific study to link to, but seeing as there's just a tiny group of people online complaining about this serves as my baseline for that argument. It is making issues out of non-issues instead of handling and working on things that do matter. If people honestly feel the portrayal of Samus and her other female counterparts in other videogames warrant attention more than the issue of unequal pay — a cause which women started fighting for in the 70s and still society at large has yet to rectify — then honestly they are more focused on their own image than on the unfair treatment of women.

Galenmereth

#17

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

@Yorumi: I am not attacking any specific person, although I have quite a few in mind. However, again, I do not mention names because that would be a personal attack, and I do not condone that in any way. But sometimes it's required to not tippy toe around people's feelings and just say what you mean: these are my opinions. I'm not naming or targeting anyone with them, and so I do not see what harm it causes whatsoever.

Galenmereth

#18

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

@MagusDiablo: I am saying it to prove a point: that these arguments are patently absurd, and the people making a fuss about this seem to only want attention. Sexualization in videogames is a non-issue: unequal pay and governments trying to regulate things like birth control are true issues for women that the social justice warrior league don't seem to give two seconds of thought for. All they want is to complain about something but do nothing to try to fix anything. Most of them are attention seeking people with an agenda: marketing their own image.

Galenmereth

#19

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: A History of the Sexualisation ...:

Ok, I'm going to bring this argument down to the level it seems to like to go in: the writer of this article is male, thus part of the patriarchy that oppresses women, and so his opinion is void. Furthermore, since we know no free-thinking woman would ever wear something like a sports bra and shorts attire, or a skin-tight suit (or tights!) by her own free will, all women doing this are not acting out of free will, but are acting out of the oppression of the patriarchy.

Galenmereth

#21

Galenmereth commented on Screenshots Disabled in Comic Workshop Miivers...:

@McGruber I hear that. I'm 28 myself, and Letterbox was a service I really enjoyed. I had many "pen-pals" there from all over the world, where we would draw drawings and short stories back and forth to each other. And then Nintendo shut the whole thing down because someone didn't behave, and a parent complained. I mean, I really don't see why they couldn't just make the app unavailable if you had parental restrictions activated. Instead all of us just lost a feature that made the console a great social medium...

To me as an adult, that is offensive, because I'm pretty much being told that this device is now for children first, and everything must be child-proof on it. And apparently since there is the off chance someone doesn't behave, I lose a great feature. It's no wonder a lot of people see Nintendo's consoles as "childish" when things like this keep happening.

For everyone with children who think this is ok: if you haven't set up the parental restrictions on your childs' 3DS or Wii U, they can tap the browser icon and watch porn on it. Or anything else. They can visit 4chan if they want, too. So if you're worried about your children being contacted or getting in contact with strangers, or seeing imagery unfit for them, set up parental restrictions and inform other parents of the same. And perhaps, if you'd be so kind, stop ruining everyone else's fun.

Galenmereth

#22

Galenmereth commented on Screenshots Disabled in Comic Workshop Miivers...:

GTA is 18+ on the package. If a parent does not follow this, it is their problem. If parents do not even bother setting up child protection systems on consoles given to their children, it is their responsibility. You can argue all you want that most parents don't do this: all that says is that most parents aren't doing their jobs as parents when it comes to letting their kids play with consoles.

Here's a parenting tip: children below a certain age should not be allowed to play games on consoles unsupervised. I know that sounds like too hard a job, but hey, that's how I was raised. I still managed to sneak out and play Doom when I was way too young because a friends' parent's didn't give a crap about age ratings, and I certainly survived it. But does that mean nobody should be able to play Doom because kids /might/ play it due to irresponsible parents? "Think of the children" is an argument used by parents who do not wish to be responsible for raising their own children.

Galenmereth

#24

Galenmereth commented on Screenshots Disabled in Comic Workshop Miivers...:

@Kalmaro With any service where people can post drawn images, there will be kids drawing dicks. If that causes so much trouble, then don't allow kids on the platform.

The thing people forget in all this "please think of tje children" nonsense is that these services aren't just for kids — they're also for adults that do behave themselves. When Nintendo shuts down Letterbox in its entirety because one bad apple managed to get one child to post inappropriate pictures or details — allegedly — then I am angry. Because you can never ever stop this from happening unless you shut it all down. Instead, use the built in child protection to keep children out of it. Case solved.

I am actually getting legitimately angry at the approach Nintendo is taking because it not only makes using these online services completely useless, but it also hurts their reputation. It's nonsensical, ridiculous, and no other company does this. And the children are still ok.

Galenmereth

#25

Galenmereth commented on Screenshots Disabled in Comic Workshop Miivers...:

Seriously, the consoles have child protection systems. Just make it so you can't view images created by others if the system is in protected mode. If parents fail to utilize this system — which they are informed of when starting it for the first time — it's their fault, and Nintendo's hands are clean.

This solution Nintendo is using now — like the closure of letterbox — is borderline offensive to me as an adult, and I really kitten hate it.
Please watch the profanity — TBD

Galenmereth

#27

Galenmereth commented on Mario Kart 8 Still Competing in Nordic Region ...:

I'm probably the only Norwegian that enjoys Tomodachi Life. That's probably not true, but it feels like it.

Then again, the game wouldn't have been fun at all if it wasn't for the fact that I made an irc community into characters in it, and other people find it hilarious to watch what develops. If I had been playing it alone, I don't think I'd enjoy it at all.

Galenmereth

#32

Galenmereth commented on Mercedes DLC Confirmed for Mario Kart 8 in the...:

I don't like non-Nintendo product placement in my Nintendo games, TYVM. I really really hope I don't see this online if I don't download it; it ruins the feel of the game, simply put. I don't care if other people enjoy it, but I'll actually get annoyed if it's forced on me. I hope those who like this can respect that.

Galenmereth

#33

Galenmereth commented on Eiji Aonuma Plans To Shake Up the Puzzle Formu...:

@Shambo Skyward Sword was a wagglefest of a game, with the first few hours of the game a boring, mind-numbingly extended tutorial made for people who'd never played a game before.

I couldn't play through the game for those two reasons. The motion controls better be completely optional in the next one, or I won't bite again, no matter how gorgeous it's looking.

Galenmereth

#34

Galenmereth commented on Steel Diver Version 2.0 Delayed, Now Targeting...:

Now if only online matches didn't disconnect ALL THE TIME. I can count on one hand the amount of complete matches I've been able to have, both globally and in my own region. And before you ask: Yes, every other 3DS game works flawlessly online, so no, it's not a local problem.

Galenmereth

#35

Galenmereth commented on Video: Musician Lindsey Stirling Dresses Up As...:

Eh, I really am not a fan of her videos. The random jumping about with a violin in hand doesn't do it for me.

Also disappointed that it isn't a cover of a song from the game; I don't see any relevance between her song and the game's theme at all.

Galenmereth

#40

Galenmereth commented on Talking Point: Nintendo Must Take Careful Step...:

PrincessEevee9: That something is "not required" is at this point uncertain, and also subjective. Some may say that half of the racers in a Mario Kart game are "required", and the rest not, while others would feel differently. Day-one DLC is a touchy topic because of this, because in many cases, the content feels "required" for mostly everyone, and yet you have to pay even more for it, making it feel like a sneaky way to inflate game prices while preying on the human mind. After all, paying 40$ for a game and then 20$ for extra content "feels" better than 60$ upfront for the game, at least to some, and if it's presented cleverly. This is the problem.

Galenmereth

#41

Galenmereth commented on Review: Nintendo Pocket Football Club (3DS eShop):

@Damo How necessary would you say the microtransactions are for fully enjoying the game? Having played my fair share of iOS games through the last years, I've grown very, very, VERY sceptical to microtransactions. It's enough to make me drop this whole game, especially since it's already far from cheap.

Galenmereth

#42

Galenmereth commented on Review: Yoshi's New Island (3DS):

If only there was a demo so I could try this out. After the disappointing Yoshi's Island DS, I won't fall for this again, especially considering the mediocre reviews. But a demo would go a long way in potentially convincing myself that I could like it.

Alas, there is no such thing.

Galenmereth

#43

Galenmereth commented on Animal Crossing: New Leaf's Team Was An Even S...:

@Ralizah Absolutely agree. In many ways, it's progressive also when compared to western games, which tend to lack balance and finesse in this area. Either a game is all out "progressive" and often feeling disingenous, or they're Gears of War. No, a buff female militant is not progressive...

AC:NL feels honest. When you play a male character, and try on a dress in the store, Mable says something along the lines of "I guess it's ok to be adventurous sometimes." This is actually very clever, because society as of right now – east or west – does not truly accept men dressed in women's clothing, but it's not such a big taboo anymore. It's alright to be adventurous, and the game reflects this. It ever so subtly tells you that it can be ok to wear a women's dress as a man, but do know that it can cause some awkward reactions. It's one of those tiny details on this topic that games can do a much better job of conveying than any other medium, because you have to decide to try it before the reaction is conveyed.

Galenmereth

#45

Galenmereth commented on Soapbox: Ignoring The Objectification Of Women...:

@blodermoder Physical attraction is a necessary and fundamental part of mammal psychology, humans included. While many (myself included) tend to prefer emotional and psychological compatibility more than physiological qualities, physical appearance still plays a significant part when it comes to being able to be attracted to another person. And if you're going to have a healthy relationship with another person, you need to be emotionally and physically attracted to them. If neither is lacking, it can't last long. The scales may tip differently for different people, but both are significant.

This is where sexual objectification comes in: We all have different preferences in physical characteristics when looking for a mate. And make no mistake: Most of our life is spent looking for a mate in one way or another. We are driven by this basic instinct much more than most of us seem aware of. And now enters the common difference between the male and female psyche and instincts when it comes to finding a sexual partner: Males tend to be far more physical. Breasts, hips, skin tone (as a sign of poor or good health), hair qualities, overall body shape; these are important characteristics for a male to find a partner, because it determines the success of healthy and strong offspring. Females also look for physical characteristics, of course, but while physical strength was paramount for healthy offspring in the distant past, in modern times, the strength of a man can be measured by his wealth and/or his power over others (leadership). Today, relative wealth and influence is much more beneficial in terms of security of offspring than physical health. Of course, if a man has a strong, lean physical body and wealth and power, then that is the ideal suitor.

At this point it's apparent that while the options for a succesfull mate have become more varied for females, for men it's to a much lesser degree. Physical appearance, in most societies, is still the dominating factor. These are not absolutes, however, and it varies greatly from society to society; from the west, where women pursue long careers often at the cost of having children – to the middle east, where things are standing still and women are still very suppressed.

This is not off topic, actually: Art can be as much self-fullfillment and gratification as it is social commentary. Pornography, whatever one might think of the demeaning position it puts women in even in modern western society (something I personally cannot enjoy watching), is important. It's important because sexuality when one is alone is as important as when with a partner. But sometimes sexuality is a bit more subtle than that; just playing around in a fantasy environment where all the characters are ample bosomed women flashing their panties can, obviously, have a negative affect on a child's mind, but it can also have a positive effect on a mature mind. Because you get to live out a fantasy that isn't real, you can be more equipped to tackle reality, where everything is far more complicated, comes at an enormous emotional toll (dating is very tough for most people, especially if it doesn't go well). This is where sexual objectification is a good thing; because humans have sexual fantasies, and we can live these out to some extent in virtual environments where no real people are hurt. The few that tend to not understand the gap between reality and the virtual realm have psychological problems that would pose a problem regardless of whether their fantasy plays out in their mind or on a TV screen.

I'd like to comment on the cognitive dissonance part: I am not indifferent towards violence, but I am a curious person. I like to experience as many different experiences as possible in life, bar dangerous substances that alter the chemical makeup of my brain far more rapidly than visual and audio input does. While I'm no doubt indifferent to a certain extent to violence seen on a screen – the internet has caused this – I still do not enjoy violence for the sake of violence. Games like GTA, for example, are amusing playgrounds, but I do find the often gratuitous violence to take more away from the experience than it gives. It removes the weight of violence, and makes every scene that is meant to shock (through story) that much less effective. I do not think that it's only natural for women to be shown this way, but I think that as long as there's variation in how women are depicted – and with today's tv shows, movies and games, there's greater variation than ever.

Sexual objectification will be the norm for a long time: It is a part of our basic instincts. But we have moved into an era where the objectification of people – men and women alike – is more and more in safe fantasy environments, and we are bridging the rights gap between the sexes more and more. That is the important fight: That both sexes be allowed the same fantasies, the same freedoms and opportunities, and the same rights to enjoy objectified charicatures of the gender(s) that they are attracted to.

Galenmereth

#46

Galenmereth commented on Soapbox: Ignoring The Objectification Of Women...:

@blodermoder Sure, but please also read my earlier post about psychology and biology, and do also account for sexuality: While no doubt we should always strive to improve and do better in society and culture, not all objectification is inherently bad. If you are going to claim that games can instill values in society, then why are we not all mass-murderers and raving psychopaths by now? For all of the hours I have spent fragging people in Unreal Tournament 2k4 (the count exceeded 1500 hours last I checked, many many years ago), I am a pacifist in reality; I refused military duty, and while I have trained martial arts, I have used it to never have to fight anyone. For all of the hours I have spent watching anime which obviously objectifies women, I do in no way confuse that with real women; contrary, I watch such shows with women and we both find them amusing, often funny in their banality (a pantyshot again?) Obviously this is anecdotal, but do understand that people in general are not paper thin charicatures; few people play a game and think that women in real life are sluts because the women in the game is. I do understand that a few do, but that is actually a whole other psychological issue, which usually will fall under different categories of delusion. Entertainment and art can reinforce stereotypes, obviously, but you also have to understand the flipside of this: That entertainment and art can be a contrast to reality to bring about a broader look on reality as a whole. I would hate for everything to be homogenized so as to not offend anyone, not that it's possible in the slightest.

Galenmereth

#47

Galenmereth commented on Soapbox: Ignoring The Objectification Of Women...:

@Phle There are all sorts of women out there; don't stigmatize naturally thin and muscular women who look good without makeup. They exist, too, you know.

While the above is slightly in jest – they do exist, though – this is the problem with this argument; there are all sorts of women out there. All sorts. There are women who find games like Senran Kagura Burst a lot of fun, without them wanting to (or not) look like the girs in the game, or not even offended in the slightest. The fight shouldn't be against the portrayal of women in fantastic settings; it should be about equality in rights and opportunity. All this energy is wasted on something that art has done since we started to draw anything more detailed than stick figures on cave walls: Artists paint people unrealistically, often idealistically to impress or to arouse. This is not something that hurts women; lower wages, lack of human rights (like in the Middle East) and being robbed of opportunities in male dominated societies: That is what hurts women.

We objectify men just as much as women; it's just different, because different objectifications interest (or turn on) women, than men. This is something people would understand if they actually talked to a lot of different people.

Galenmereth

#48

Galenmereth commented on Soapbox: Ignoring The Objectification Of Women...:

@Zach: Excuse me here, but you do know men and women are psychologically and physiologically different, right? We should all have the same rights in society, obviously, but to say that women === men is ridiculous. Women have a tendency to fantasize differently about sex than men, for example. Women have a tendency (and do note my repeat use of the word "tendency", because of course this is not globally true for all women everywhere) to be desired, and physiologically women have a tendency to be more attracted to men that can provide for them. This is biology and psychology that combines into what people consider "stereotypes", which it is; we are mammals and our actions and thoughts can be explained to great lengths by basic psychological archetypes.

This is why one has to consider this when one looks for problems in the way women are presented to men in mediums such as art, books, and games; because it's usually teams consisting of mostly men that make these games, and often they target them towards male demographics. I'm sure by now you're thinking "but it's about time we changed this", and I agree to some extent; we should strive to evolve as a species. However, you cannot ignore the presence of biology, psychology, and the inherent physiological and psychological differences between the sexes.

If you look at soap operas that are made for female demographics, I will imagine you'd be hard pressed not to see the male characters as objectified. But they're objectified differently than women usually are; they don't go around dangling super large manly bits, for example, but they do build off psychological archetypes and physical stereotypes that women have a tendency to largely find attractive.

It worries me that we are looking at this so very "black and white"; as if it's all either good or bad. Objectification is inherent in our psychology; we are each and every one of us the only subject in our reality. Everyone else is an object, because we can only try to understand their complex feelings and thoughts, but we can never truly know anyone but ourselves. Objectification combined with sexuality is necessary, because imagination is necessary for a healthy sexuality.

Galenmereth

#49

Galenmereth commented on Soapbox: Ignoring The Objectification Of Women...:

Well, better abolish porn, implement draconian porn filters, and otherwise do what the UK is doing.

Sounds great; I'll keep holding onto my freedom of expression thank you very much. Games are art, and if you're going to not allow certain kinds of art, then you are censoring art. Once you censor art, you've lost it as a society.