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Elliander

Elliander

United States

Joined:
Fri 23rd December, 2011

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Elliander

#1

Elliander commented on Talking Point: Is There A Future For The Wii U...:

@datamonkey I found a way to turn off the screen, but as soon as you push any buttons it comes back on.

Home Button > Controller Settings > Display Off

Of course, this doesn't really do with any good for games that just mirror the screen from the TV to the gamepad and don't offer anything new. In those situations we don't have the ability to turn off the screen which greatly affects battery life.

Elliander

#2

Elliander commented on Talking Point: Is There A Future For The Wii U...:

@element187 honestly, that's the problem. Most of the games that I have seen so far have no problem streaming from the console to the game pad screen, but that's all they do. Its just two identical screens with no additional functionality. I like having the option of using a gamepad screen, but I really don't like being prevented from using a pro controller instead, at least for these games.

Elliander

#4

Elliander commented on Talking Point: Is There A Future For The Wii U...:

@QuickSilver88 card games would be especially useful on the Wii U gamepad, assuming we can get more than two. If you have ever tried playing uno on xbox you would understand how hilarious it is to try. Everyone can see everyone else's hand. But on the Wii U, you can keep your hands separate. No one else has to see what cards you have.

Elliander

#5

Elliander commented on Talking Point: Is There A Future For The Wii U...:

I purchased a Wii U and although I love the potential I hate how I am being forced to use it for EVERYTHING. I can't set up a console or shop or edit settings without it and I can never turn it off.

In every game I played so far the gamepad should have been optional. I like the usability of mario bros wii u, but if I play solo I can't use the touch screen anyway, yet I am forced to play with the oversized controller. It's nice to have the option of hand held playing so someone else can use the tv, but how about giving me the option of playing with my pro controller?

Then there's Doctor Luigi which, adide from a special touch screen mode, is also two identical screens.

Cloudberry Kingdom gives me the option of playing solo with the pro controller, but more than 3 players and the 4th will have to use the gamepad which isn't being utilized in the least.

Trine 2 won't allow me to play single player with a pro controller eithet and it is also just a mirrored screen.

Edge is a single player puzzle game that doesn't need it either, but requires it. At least it will only show the game on one of the screens.

The pattern is clear: No games make much use of it, yet no player is given the option of doing without. This is especially bad when you consider that the gamepad costs $150 to replace and the target demographic is children prone to breaking things.

.......

I don't want to see the gamepad abandoned entirely, but I do wish they would be more sensible about it. All games should have the option of using the pro controller instead of the gamepad when the gamepad isn't utilized. Games already released should be retroactively adjusted accordingly. Menus should give the option of using other controllers.

Donkey for the gamepads themselves, I feel they need to be expanded on. Right now the range is not very good. If they added on NFC repeater that you can plug in somewhere in another room just within range of the console after syncing, which would both the console and Gamepad would sync through when not in range, it would actually be possible to even daisy chain them to accommodate any sized house so that you can truly take this controller anywhere you need it to be. Additionally, such repeaters if done right could be used to enable support for additional gamepads without a loss of frame rate and would even make it possible to have more than 2 supported.

These gamepads have quite a bit of potential for games and should be expanded on, but again should not be forced on people either.

Elliander

#7

Elliander commented on Nintendo Determined to Beat Hackers with Wii U...:

Turns out the Wii-U does perform automatic updates without permission. When you say "no" it happens in the background anyway. This can be a serious problem because if you interrupt the update in progress your Wii-U will be bricked. Many people with spotty connections will also be affected even if they do know, and since the whole purpose behind the majority of these updates is to combat piracy the consequence will just be to expose everyone else to bricking.

Isn't it ironic that the only people who will be adversely affected by this "security" are the people who think they are safe because they are not modding?

Elliander

#8

Elliander commented on Nintendo Determined to Beat Hackers with Wii U...:

Piracy is not the only reason why people mod their consoles. While Piracy does indeed happen, many mods come as a result of an actual need. For example, Nintendo insisted that no one needs any more storage practically insulting it's customers in the way it said so. In response, the modding community found a way to enable 32-GB SD cards and shortly after Nintendo did the same. Nintendo disabled the ability to play legally owned DVD movies from the Wii, so the modding community unlocks it. Unfortunately Nintendo responds by physically blocking that capability in revisions which still makes no sense. Then there is region free: There are a number of English games released in Europe that are not released in North America, and even those games that exist in both usually the one released later has more content. Additionally there are some games in Japan never released in English that I really like.

While Piracy can be a problem you need to step back and think about it for a moment. Would a person pirating a few hundred games be likely to spend money on all of those games? No. While it may be true that the ability to pirate decreases the amount of money those people spend on games, it isn't nearly as big of an issue Nintendo is making it out to be especially since these people make up the minority.

I should also point out that because Piracy is looked down upon, the programmers of some modding tools cannot be used alongside other hacks. There are all kinds of crazy and interesting stuff that modding can do that isn't against the law. On the contrary, I would argue that Nintendo earned at least as much money as it lost to pirate in the way that modding has kept the system flourishing. Most non-party games can be beaten so quickly that renting would be enough, but if you can revisit those games with mods that you need the disc for you are more likely to buy.

Now, if someone were to purchase a Wii-U and mod it and it were to be bricked, it would be very easy to prove if someone was pirating or not. If someone isn't pirating and simply unlocking a feature for increased usability Nintendo would be open to a lawsuit. Why? Because regardless of whatever is written in the EULA Nintendo doesn't have the legal authority to destroy private property. This was verified in a parallel case involving cell phones. The cell phone companies didn't want people unlocking their phone to use with another carrier and when it came to a lawsuit the courts ruled that because the phone is physically owned by the customer the most they can legally do is invalidate a warranty. More recently in cases involving the iPhone people have been unlocking it for a very good reason: Turns out if you accept an update on an obsolete model everything slows to a crawl and the only way to fix is to unlock the phone. There are other reasons to unlock as well, but Apple does not have the legal authority to brick them. Back to Nintendo, the simply fact is that there are enough legal precedents to show that Nintendo cannot do this, but because no one has actually brought Nintendo to court about it yet the issue continues. In all honesty though it would only be a matter of time before the bricking strategy fails for the same reason as it did in other industry sectors.

It's also creepy some of the things Nintendo authorizes itself to do that goes above and beyond preventing piracy. It reminds me of the Amazon Kindle scandal where Amazon sold something it shouldn't have and then hacked into people's devices and deleted the offending material without users permission. Even when companies say they never would, just having the ability to access people's devices remotely concerns me.

Elliander

#9

Elliander commented on Review: Fortune Street (Wii):

I have the game and I love it, but I would give it only 5 stars entirely because there is no way to save in multiplayer. I use my Wii primarily as a party console and I have yet to be able to complete a single multiplayer game of Fortune Street. Even at the lowest options of the simplest board we just can't finish it in a single gaming session. I consider the save game feature very important and your review doesn't mention it at all.