16. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC)

The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC)The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages (GBC)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Flagship
Release Date: 14th May 2001 (USA) / 5th Oct 2001 (UK/EU)

Oracle of Ages, on the other hand, gave you the Harp of Ages, which you could use to travel through time. Again, this was primarily used to solve puzzles, by moving a stone in the past to redirect the flow of water in the future or planting seeds that will grow into trees and vines.

Owning both Oracle of Ages and Seasons allowed you to unlock additional content in each game that couldn't be accessed any other way. Neat!

15. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (Wii)

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (Wii)The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (Wii)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 19th Nov 2006 (USA) / 8th Dec 2006 (UK/EU)

Now the list starts to get a little trickier. Next up we have Twilight Princess, which was simultaneously Zelda's swansong on the GameCube and its introduction on the Wii.

Twilight Princess remains an excellent action adventure in its own right, and one well worth playing for every single fan of Zelda. But that doesn't change the fact it has more than its fair share of problems.

It's biggest issue is that it did little to shake up the Zelda formula, which was feeling a little tired at this point; it plays a bit too similarly to Ocarina of Time and Wind Waker. It also forced you to fight through a few dungeons multiple times, both as Wolf Link – who was questionably fun at best – and regular Link.

The Wii controls added little and that version of the game flipped the entire game world horizontally, which might upset die-hard fans familiar with Hyrule's geography from other games in the series. It did add widescreen, though and there's a lot to love. The HD version on Wii U restored the GameCube's orientation and is arguably the definitive version, but while it hits some brilliant highs, Twilight Princess didn't hit them as consistently as some other entries.

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14. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)

The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GCN)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 7th Jun 2004 (USA) / 7th Jan 2005 (UK/EU)

This entry on our list includes both The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords (GBA) and The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GC). These were multiplayer titles that rounded up four friends to battle through Hyrule together as different coloured Links.

The most genius feature of this entry was the fact that you'd each control the game using a Game Boy Advance, and that your character would display on your GBA when it walked off the TV screen. This allowed each player to explore a dungeon at their will, and opened it up for some far greater team play.

You could play this single player, but why would you want to? It was tailor-made for multiplayer, and really needs other people to get the most out of it. If you've got the requisite willing participants (and consoles), thrilling adventures await in these games.

13. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (DS)

The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (DS)The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass (DS)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 1st Oct 2007 (USA) / 19th Oct 2007 (UK/EU)

The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass was the first exclusive mainline Zelda game on the Nintendo DS, and one which aimed to take full advantage of the touch and dual screens. It achieved that with aplomb, allowing you to take notes, aim your boomerang and arrows, and solve puzzles directly using just the touchscreen.

It also allowed for intriguing boss battles, as certain parts of the enemy could be displayed on the upper or bottom screen. Combat was also a blast considering that you controlled it solely using the stylus.

12. The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks (DS)

The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks (DS)The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks (DS)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Nintendo EAD
Release Date: 7th Dec 2009 (USA) / 11th Dec 2009 (UK/EU)

The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks was the direct follow-up to Phantom Hourglass, and traded sailing the high seas for choo-chooing across the kingdom by rail to an inspiring soundtrack. You'd plot a route, set the speed, and clear the path of enemies using the in-built cannon.

Also new was Link's Phantom companion, which he could take into dungeons with him. The phantom could carry Link across dangerous environments, block him from harm, or simply be used as a platform. Spirit Tracks also famously used the DS's microphone as a game mechanic. You could blow into it to use the Whirlwind and Spirit Pipes, among other items. A fun little idea in concept, although it obviously relied on audio to function, meaning that a noisy environment would interfere with your playing.

Ultimately, the game built on everything Phantom Hourglass achieved to create the ultimate Zelda on DS.

11. Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the NecroDancer Featuring The Legend of Zelda (Switch eShop)

Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the NecroDancer Featuring The Legend of Zelda (Switch eShop)Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the NecroDancer Featuring The Legend of Zelda (Switch eShop)
Publisher: Nintendo / Developer: Brace Yourself Games
Release Date: 13th Jun 2019 (USA) / 13th Jun 2019 (UK/EU)

Ooo, the controversy! A spin-off title developed by indie outfit Brace Yourself Games (and winner of 'Most Unwieldy Game Title 2019'), Cadence of Hyrule: Crypt of the NecroDancer Featuring The Legend of Zelda is an excellent game, but is it a Zelda game?

Short answer: absolutely. This isn't a case of swapping out the sprites of Crypt of the NecroDancer with Link and Zelda, this is a new take on Hyrule and the top-down Zelda mechanics we all know and love that freshens the formula while retaining all the hallmarks you'd expect in a Nintendo-developed Zelda title. You get the exploration, the discovery, the wonder, the items, the dungeons and - most of all - the music, all shot through with a rhythm-based gameplay twist that takes a while to get used to, but is immensely satisfying once you do.

It's also arguably the most replayable Zelda game ever. Each new game juggles the landscape and layout of the kingdom - playing with the notion of Hyrule's ever changing geography throughout the series - meaning no playthrough will be quite the same. It's a much shorter experience than most of the other games on this list; once you know what you're doing, what other Zelda game here could you blast through in an afternoon?

It won't click with everyone - and if you're after 80-hour epics, you'll want to look elsewhere - but as you can see from this selection, there are plenty of them already. Having a smaller experience on Switch that feels uniquely fresh and also completely 'Zelda' is a joy.