Nintendo has always been very protective of its tech, and for generations now has held a policy that voids your ability to have the company repair your console for free if you use a third party product in tandem with it. So, for example, if you were to replace the software on the Switch with something of your own design, Nintendo could refuse to repair your Switch hardware, even if the Joy-Con controller it came with was defective.

Apparently, rules like this are illegal (at least in the United States) under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, and the FTC has issued letters to six companies that sell consumer products in the United States to address this. In an official press release from the FTC, a few examples of questionable warranties from anonymous companies are given, and here’s what one of them says:

This warranty shall not apply if this product . . . is used with products not sold or licensed by [company name].

Now, here’s the official warranty from Nintendo’s website:

This warranty shall not apply if this product is used with products not sold or licensed by Nintendo.

Assuming Nintendo was one of the companies that got a letter, it will have thirty days to revise the warranty policy or the company will face legal action.

What do you think? Is Nintendo’s warranty policy fair? What do you think will happen if the company uses more relaxed rules? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

[via ftc.gov, arstechnica.com]