The Switch may be a runaway success but Nintendo isn't content to sit back and take it easy now the cash is rolling in; it has announced that it is collaborating with San Francisco-based Scrum Ventures to find startup companies which can unearth new ways to leverage the power of the console.

The Nintendo Switch + Tech program will look for startup firms, groups within larger companies or university researchers developing new tools to augment the capabilities of Switch. Developments will be strictly hardware-based, and will cover new components, sensors, chips and other add-on devices. 

Scrum and Nintendo will be on-hand to provide assistance to bring products to the market, but neither firm plans to invest directly in the startups and groups involved in the program. Scrum has stated that it will choose which ideas are best to pitch to Nintendo, and successful applications could find their way into official Nintendo products. 

Nintendo is clearly keen to expand the horizons of its Switch system; this month will see the launch of Labo, a cardboard construction system which uses the console's features - most notably the Joy-Con's IR camera - to create functionals objects such as cars, fishing rods and pianos.

Ko Shiota, a senior executive officer at Nintendo, said:

We are always exploring ways to evolve entertainment. As one of our approaches we look forward to discovering unique technologies that add to the Nintendo Switch experiences through the program managed by Scrum Ventures.

The market has reacted positively to the news, with Nintendo's share value rising 1 percent on Friday. 

This unique approach shows the company is focused on keeping the Switch as vibrant and exciting as possible, but it also contrasts sharply with the accepted way of doing things in the games industry, where new hardware ideas are often developed in-house at a staggering cost, or licensed directly from other established tech firms. 

Could this venture result in some new and groundbreaking Switch accessories and add-ons? Let us know what you think by posting a comment.

[via bloomberg.com, switchplustech.com]