Former Sega CEO Was Instrumental In Securing Unity's Nintendo Deal

Development platform is being pushed out to first and third party studios

We've already touched upon the significance of Nintendo's agreement with Unity, but CEO David Helgason has spilled a few more beans in an exclusive interview with the lovely folks at VG247.

Interestingly, he reveals that former Sega of America boss Shinobu Toyoda played a massive part in getting the deal inked:

We were over in Japan last year with our really good tech people who are famous in the Japanese industry, such as Shinobu Toyoda, who was the American CEO of Sega. He is very well connected. So we led the charge on this partnership – we were excited about it, as were Nintendo.

Helgason also revealed that Unity had approached Nintendo five years ago, but couldn't agree to a deal:

It’s actually been a dream of ours to be the default development kit for something you can access if you’re just building games for a particular console. I remember we pitched the idea to at last Nintendo, but also Sony maybe five years ago, but of course back then we were a tiny company, and we didn’t have a lot of users.

So, it was understandable that they didn’t bite back then, although I think they should have, because the tools were really good back then, but they weren’t yet proven. We didn’t have 1.2 million registered users, or 200,000 monthly users back then – we probably had closer to 200.

According to the Unity CEO, Nintendo is bringing in the development software for its first party studios to use, as well as offering it to third party Wii U developers as well.

[via vg247.com]

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