Wii U Forum

Topic: Wii U should have an official gigabit Ethernet adapter.

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skywake

21. Posted:

One of these is the Wii LAN adapter, the other is built in fast ethernet on an old laptop
Untitled
Same speed and definitely not limited to 10Mbps. If you don't to a simultaneous test the bandwidth on both pushes upto 90-95Mbps on both. And for the record the "server" in this case was running on a gigabit adapter and there was gigabit cabling/switches from point to point all the way upto the adapter.

BOOM, done. Now just link back to this page whenever someone makes a thread like this again.

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WhereEaglesDare

22. Posted:

skywake wrote:

One of these is the Wii LAN adapter, the other is built in fast ethernet on an old laptop
Untitled

Seems legit if...one more question. Are you sure this is the official LAN adapter?

WhereEaglesDare

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skywake

23. Posted:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

Seems legit if...one more question. Are you sure this is the official LAN adapter?

You just don't like to be wrong do you?

I brought it from ozgameshop.com as an official adapter, it came in a box that said it was the official adapter, it has the Nintendo logo on the top side, it's grey and on the bottom sticker it says "Wii TM LAN ADAPTER NINTENDO RVL-015". I've brought enough Nintendo stuffs in my time to know what an official product looks like. Do you need a photo? Or if I posted a photo would you assume I'm grabbing it off the internet?

See this is why I didn't bother making a video out of this peoples. This thread will be dead in a week but a youtube video would be questions like this for years ;)

Edited on by skywake

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WhereEaglesDare

24. Posted:

So the Wii U adapter is still horribly slow and is a separate purchase. Good to know.

WhereEaglesDare

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SCAR392

25. Posted:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

So the Wii U adapter is still horribly slow and is a separate purchase. Good to know.

You still don't get it...

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DanMan82

26. Posted:

@WhereEaglesDare

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"If you accept the expectations of others, especially negative ones, then you never will change the outcome."- Michael Jordan
“I am thankful for all of those who said NO to me. Its because of them I’m doing it myself.” – ?????

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skywake

27. Posted:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

So the Wii U adapter is still horribly slow and is a separate purchase. Good to know.

Take it from someone who knows enough about it to have actually benchmarked it. Someone who has Gigabit network points running to most rooms in the house and has worked hard getting everything optimised for speed at reasonable cost. There are only two devices in my house that actually need Gigabit at this point. My computer needs it because I sometimes move large files over my network and my NAS needs it as a source for moving said large files. Everything else is fine with 10/100Mbps.

Actually everything else runs at 10/100 and I haven't had much of a problem. Underneath my TV I have a 10/100Mbps switch so everything connected to it runs at 100Mbps. Never had a problem with that and for what I generally use it for, streaming HD video and downloading stuffs from the nets, it's as good as the Gigabit on my computer. Videos in particular you hit play and it runs instantly. That's the same speed the LAN adapter is running at, it's by no means "horribly" slow.

I might need to upgrade to a Gigabit switch when SteamOS hits so I can do LAN-Streaming at high quality 60fps. Right now though I have no need for it. I especially have no need for it on any of the current gen or last gen consoles. Please think about what you're saying before you post.

Edited on by skywake

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WhereEaglesDare

28. Posted:

skywake wrote:

Take it from someone who knows enough about it to have actually benchmarked it. Someone who has Gigabit network points

You live in Australia... you're limited by your country's internet speeds, not what your devices are capable of at peak, (minus the LAN streaming) so all your pointing out is that it's odd that the Wii U has none.

Really odd that you're now moving goalposts after being right about the adapter being 10/100, not 10...

Gigabit Ethernet (also great for LAN gaming) is a built-in console standard now and is an oddball not to include as we move into a new decade and internet speeds slowly but surely improve. At the very least an adapter.

Edited on by WhereEaglesDare

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skywake

29. Posted:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

skywake wrote:

Take it from someone who knows enough about it to have actually benchmarked it. Someone who has Gigabit network points

You live in Australia... you're limited by your country's internet speeds, not what your devices are capable of at peak, (minus the LAN streaming)

And at 100Mbps LAN speed you're not? You're on a 200Mbps service are you? What speed are Nintendo's servers running at for you? At this point in time those sort of speeds are "infrastructure" speeds not service speeds. As a consumer those are the speeds you buy if you expect five people to be hammering your 'nets all at once. Mostly because it's so uncommon (not just in Aus but globally) that nobody really puts much effort into making things run at that speed to a single user.

So I'm willing to bet that everyone with a Wii U is limited to speeds under 100Mbps one way or another.

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

Really odd that you're now moving goalposts after being right about the adapter being 10/100, not 10...

I wasn't the one that set the goalposts I was just correcting your claim that it runs at 10Mbps. If it did run at 10Mbps it would be crap. The good thing is it doesn't, it runs at 100Mbps and there's plenty of headroom in 100Mbps for what the Wii U is used for so therefore there's no problem. You're manufacturing a problem that doesn't exist.

edit:
and to avoid potential confusion "10/100" is the same as 100Mbps. The "10" in 10/100 reffers to backwards compatibility with 10Mbps speeds. In the same way Gigabit can be written as 10/100/1000 but nobody does because it's longer to type than "gigabit" or "1Gbps".

Edited on by skywake

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WhereEaglesDare

30. Posted:

skywake wrote:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

skywake wrote:

Take it from someone who knows enough about it to have actually benchmarked it. Someone who has Gigabit network points

You live in Australia... you're limited by your country's internet speeds, not what your devices are capable of at peak, (minus the LAN streaming)

And at 100Mbps LAN speed you're not? You're on a 200Mbps service are you? What speed are Nintendo's servers running at for you? At this point in time those sort of speeds are "infrastructure" speeds not service speeds. As a consumer those are the speeds you buy if you expect five people to be hammering your 'nets all at once. Mostly because it's so uncommon (not just in Aus but globally) that nobody really puts much effort into making things run at that speed to a single user.

So I'm willing to bet that everyone with a Wii U is limited to speeds under 100Mbps one way or another.

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

Really odd that you're now moving goalposts after being right about the adapter being 10/100, not 10...

I wasn't the one that set the goalposts I was just correcting your claim that it runs at 10Mbps. If it did run at 10Mbps it would be crap. The good thing is it doesn't, it runs at 100Mbps and there's plenty of headroom in 100Mbps for what the Wii U is used for so therefore there's no problem. You're manufacturing a problem that doesn't exist.

edit:
and to avoid potential confusion "10/100" is the same as 100Mbps. The "10" in 10/100 reffers to backwards compatibility with 10Mbps speeds. In the same way Gigabit can be written as 10/100/1000 but nobody does because it's longer to type than "gigabit" or "1Gbps".

Yeah, I know and should have specified what 10/100/1000 and 10/100 mean in the OP.

"nobody does because it's longer to type than gigabit or 1Gbps." is disingenuous though.

http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/PlayStation+4+Teardown/19493

It just emphasizes that it supports the legacy Ethernet connections.

Also, to put this into perspective the last console besides the Wii and Wii U that lacked built-in gigabit Ethernet (which lack any built-in Ethernet) was the Xbox 360, which debuted in North America on November 22nd, 2005. The Wii came out a year later.

Minor omission sure, but there should at least be the option.

How am I moving goal posts, at the very least there should be an adaptor for this. I don't need to be at the mercy of Wi-Fi.

[qoute]I wasn't the one that set the goalposts I was just correcting your claim that it runs at 10Mbps. If it did run at 10Mbps it would be crap. The good thing is it doesn't, it runs at 100Mbps and there's plenty of headroom in 100Mbps for what the Wii U is used for so therefore there's no problem.[/qoute]

"Used for"
"Headroom"

What does what you feel the Wii U is used for and will ever need to be the max for anyone have to do with whether there should be a gigabit Ethernet adapter or not?

It's a nice feature and the Wii U's Wi-Fi is far from excellent. http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=533064

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SCAR392

31. Posted:

The funny thing is, is that that NeoGaf poster should be getting at least 12mbs on their Wii U is their iPad is getting 17mbs. There's something else going on there.

Apparently, CenturyLink upgraded our service to 9mbs. We were getting 7mbs, before. My internet got faster based off of my internet service, not a supposed threshold in the Wii U Wi-Fi chip.

People are so damn naive.

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skywake

32. Posted:

@WhereEaglesDare
I was just making sure you weren't thinking that when I said "10/100" I somehow meant it was running at 10Mbps sometimes. Something I thought was entirely necessary given your determination to have an argument about this. The fact that you had a go at me for being "disingenuous" about Gigabit by calling it Gigabit and not 10/100/1000 confirms this I believe. And no, I wasn't talking about your first post when I typed that, I didn't even realise you typed 10/100/1000 because in my head I read 10/100/1000, Gigabit, GbE, 1Gbps and 1000BASE-T as all the same thing.

As for the Wii U's networking setup being anachronistic again I don't think it matters as long as it works well for what people use it for. I don't think it's reasonable to expect during the Wii U's lifetime for something to come up that makes the Wii U's setup obsolete. What does that have to do with it being a problem or not? Well if nobody is using those speeds then what's the need for it? I'd even go as far as to argue that the PS4 and XBOne probably don't need Gigabit either for the sort of applications that have been talked about thus far. Gigabit is really only a benefit if you're moving large files across the network with the sort of media we're living with today.

Also I do agree that it would have been nice if it was included and TBH I would have been just as happy if 100Mbps was included in the box on the machine itself. However it's not the end of the world that it isn't. I have not once had a problem with anything I have thrown at my Wii U even on WiFi and you better believe I have thrown everything at that thing. That's just what I like doing.

Also that thread is misleading, those speedtesters don't work very well on the Wii U at all. As I said before I have streamed 1080p trailers to my Wii U with zero issues despite the numbers pushed out from speed testing sites as above. If I can stream a video that averages 12Mbps and peaks at a good 30Mbps with zero issues then I'm not limited to 1.5Mbps ;)

Edited on by skywake

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WhereEaglesDare

33. Posted:

skywake wrote:

@WhereEaglesDare
I was just making sure you weren't thinking that when I said "10/100" I somehow meant it was running at 10Mbps sometimes. Something I thought was entirely necessary given your determination to have an argument about this. The fact that you had a go at me for being "disingenuous" about Gigabit by calling it Gigabit and not 10/100/1000 confirms this I believe. And no, I wasn't talking about your first post when I typed that, I didn't even realise you typed 10/100/1000 because in my head I read 10/100/1000, Gigabit, GbE, 1Gbps and 1000BASE-T as all the same thing.

As for the Wii U's networking setup being anachronistic again I don't think it matters as long as it works well for what people use it for. I don't think it's reasonable to expect during the Wii U's lifetime for something to come up that makes the Wii U's setup obsolete. What does that have to do with it being a problem or not? Well if nobody is using those speeds then what's the need for it? I'd even go as far as to argue that the PS4 and XBOne probably don't need Gigabit either for the sort of applications that have been talked about thus far. Gigabit is really only a benefit if you're moving large files across the network with the sort of media we're living with today.

Also I do agree that it would have been nice if it was included and TBH I would have been just as happy if 100Mbps was included in the box on the machine itself. However it's not the end of the world that it isn't. Also that thread is misleading, those speedtesters don't work very well on the Wii U at all. As I said before I have streamed 1080p trailers to my Wii U with zero issues despite the numbers pushed out from speed testing sites as above. If I can stream a video that averages 12Mbps and peaks at a good 30Mbps with zero issues then I'm not limited to 1.5Mbps ;)

I can accept that.

At any rate this thread is pretty much over and should be linked to if anyone ever brings this up again, there's not much that hasn't been said now.

Edited on by WhereEaglesDare

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TrollingThunder

34. Posted:

This thread is a joke right?

A gigabit ethernet (10/100/1000) adaptor won't work on the Wii U. You know why? You need a USB 3.0 port for it. You cannot run a USB dongle on it to power up a Gigabit ethernet adaptor with USB 3.0 on (2) USB 2.0 ports on the Wii U. Even if it works you're limited to the maximum throughput of USB 2.0 on the Wii U which is 480 Mbps. Still, even if you have a gigabit internet connection (such as Google Fiber) that USB 2.0 bus speed is only a theoritical speed. In real world you won't be able to reach that maximum speed.

Edited on by TrollingThunder

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WhereEaglesDare

35. Posted:

TrollingThunder wrote:

This thread is a joke right?

A gigabit ethernet (10/100/1000) adaptor won't work on the Wii U. You know why? You need a USB 3.0 port for it. You cannot run a USB dongle on it to power up a Gigabit ethernet adaptor with USB 3.0 on (2) USB 2.0 ports on the Wii U. Even if it works you're limited to the maximum throughput of USB 2.0 on the Wii U which is 480 Mbps. Still, even if you have a gigabit internet connection (such as Google Fiber) that USB 2.0 bus speed is only a theoritical speed. In real world you won't be able to reach that maximum speed.

This post is a joke right?

Source for why not even with 2 of the USB 2.0 ports it could be boosted to 960? For the same reason (bandwidth) most HDD's that are compatible with the Wii U require a Y-cable when they'd use just 1 USB 3.0 port, because USB 2.0 maxes out too low.

Also, yes you can power a USB dongle that is compatible with gigabit Ethernet even if USB 2.0 is too outdated to take advantage of it. You'll probably try to move that goalpost though...

http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-USB-Gigabit-Ethernet-Adapter/...

Edited on by WhereEaglesDare

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skywake

36. Posted:

@TrollingThunder
Well true, it couldn't do Gigabit even if it wanted to with USB2 but I don't think that was the main thrust of this thread. The direction it was going had people saying the Wii LAN adapter was 10Mbps and the WiFi in the Wii U was 1.5Mbps. Also that everyone else does Gigabit so why didn't Nintendo build that into their console. Conclusion being that Nintendo had dropped the ball and we were all worse off because they were not including Gigabit.

Fact is that it's nowhere near as slow as 10Mbps and it's certainly not running at 1.5Mbps. The LAN adapter runs at 100Mbps and the WiFi built into it is doing at least 40Mbps based on the benchmarking I have done. Both of which are plenty for what people are going to use it for. Personally I think 100Mbps LAN built in would have been nice.... but not for performance reasons. It would have been nice because there are only two USB ports in the back and I'm using both for storage ;)

Edited on by skywake

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TrollingThunder

37. Posted:

[quote=TrollingThunder]

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

Also, yes you can power a USB dongle that is compatible with gigabit Ethernet even if USB 2.0 is too outdated to take advantage of it. You'll probably try to move that goalpost though...

http://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-USB-Gigabit-Ethernet-Adapter/...

http://www.usb.org/developers/usb20/faq20/

http://www.diffen.com/difference/USB_2.0_vs_USB_3.0

A USB 2.0 has a maximum theoritical speed of 480 Mbps. Did you even asked yourself as to why a USB 2.0 storage drive when connected to the back of the Wii U's USB 2.0 port need at least (2) USB 2.0 ports (a Y-cable to connect) if not externally powered? The reason is that USB 2.0 cannot provide enough power to the hard drive. USB 3.0 use up about 300 mA more of power (900 mA versus 500 mA on USB 2.0). A gigabit ethernet adaptor needs to have a USB 3.0 connection to reach a gigabit speed.

By trusting that Amazon link it shows that you really have no clue as to how USB 2.0 versus USB 3.0 work. Amazon made a typo error advertising that product. Instead of putting 10/100 fast ethernet speed it added /1000 gigabit speed.

I'm more than willing to bet a million dollars (even if I don't have that kind of money) that a USB 2.0 connection cannot reach gigabit speed. Otherwised, I won't think this thread is a joke.

Edited on by TrollingThunder

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skywake

38. Posted:

WhereEaglesDare wrote:

Source for why not even with 2 of the USB 2.0 ports it could be boosted to 960? For the same reason (bandwidth) most HDD's that are compatible with the Wii U require a Y-cable when they'd use just 1 USB 3.0 port, because USB 2.0 maxes out too low. Also, yes you can power a USB dongle that is compatible with gigabit Ethernet even if USB 2.0 is too outdated to take advantage of it. You'll probably try to move that goalpost though...

It's due to power requirements. Externally powered drives (which are usually faster than the ones that use Y cables) work fine with just one USB port. Similarly if you plug the "power" USB plug of a drive with a Y-Adapter into the a USB power adapter for the wall it'll work just fine with one USB port used. There's also the fact that:
a) USB doesn't work like that, the speed is shared across multiple ports
b) You'd be left with no USB ports on the back for storage
c) You don't even need 1Gbps

Also nobody is "moving goalposts" here. We're just starting how it all works and how fast it all runs. Something which apparently isn't sitting well with your desire to make an argument out of this. Again, it would have been nice if the Wii U had a network port on the back. However 100Mbps would have been equally as nice as 1Gbps and what it does have is close enough for it not to be an issue. There is no problem with the Wii U and its network connectivity options despite your attempts to manufacture one.

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TrollingThunder

39. Posted:

Again you just don't get it. I tried to give you a simple explanation as to why it won't work yet you went the other way. Unless by devine providence a fast ethernet connection can reach far beyond its maximum limit there's just no way for it to reach gigabit speeds. It's just not possible. The ethernet connection is handicapped to 100 Mbps cuz it has a USB 2.0 connector on the 2.0 USB port on the Wii U.

The only way to get more than 100 Mbps throughput is to used a faster Wireless AC connection to bypass the fast ethernet limitation when using a Wi-Fi adaptor. You need to use a wireless AC adaptor & connect the Wii U on either 2.4 Ghz or 5 Ghz network. Even in an extremely ideal conditions it's still very hard to reach that 480 Mbps throughput. It's only in theory. Even if you do a channel bonding on your router it still hard to reach that speed.

I got (2) Wii Us in my house (one connected with wired ethernet adaptor & the other on wireless connection). You'll be surprised how much bandwidth I'm getting on my 50 Gb download/5 Gb upload internet connection. I'm only getting less than half of my bandwidth speed on both.

Edited on by TrollingThunder

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sugarshack

40. Posted:

Just like the first reply, it's not even practical. tech isn't there yet for the necessity GB internet. I had a director
at a casino who wanted to put down GB cables down to run the slot machine gaming floor. and this was in 2009.
that would've been costly and unnecessary. how a fat *** moron received that position was beyond me.

“ I..Don't..Bargain."

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