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Topic: The Nintendo Switch Thread

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Spoony_Tech

@Ralizah Dang man, you make me want to go play some more Zelda again lol. Well said!!

The feelings I got playing Zelda I've not felt playing any other game. When I first start I spent the first 20 hours doing my own thing and not doing the main story line. I just wanted to climb, hunt, and live off the land. BotW truly made me feel like I was one my own adventure and not on guild posts the whole way through.

Edited on by Spoony_Tech

John 8:7 He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone.

MERG said:

If I was only ever able to have Monster Hunter and EO games in the future, I would be a happy man.

WHAT IS RETRO DOING??!!

Switch Friend Code: SW-7353-2587-4117 | 3DS Friend Code: 3050-7580-4390 | Nintendo Network ID: SpoonyTech | Twitter:

KirbyTheVampire

@Ralizah 1: Skyrim already did that. You have to go out and find everything yourself for it to show up on the map, save for locations that NPCs tell you about and mark on your map.

2: I agree, most open world games don't bother with too many survival game mechanics.

3: That's not entirely true. IIRC, the ocean had an invisible wall, and there's usually a valley blocking you from continuing forward, which is effectively the same thing as the cliffs or mountains that block you in other open world games. It just looks different. Some open world games are definitely more restrictive than this, true, but games like Skyrim let you go wherever you want too, albeit more awkwardly in certain circumstances due to the lack of a climbing mechanic. Not exactly what I would call innovative, although it did accomplish this a lot more smoothly than most open world games.

4: One could argue that Skyrim (again, lol) is similar in this case. Your goal is ultimately to stop Alduin , and since you start as a seemingly average person with no noteable skills, everything you do is making yourself stronger so that you can accomplish that goal.

Besides, I don't think everything the character does needs to be with the end goal of making yourself stronger. Maybe they would end up in a drinking game at the end of the day or something. Sure, you can generally do stuff in open world games that break any tension in the story, but you can do the same in Breath of the Wild. Even though the end of the world is imminent, maybe you just move into that one house and do nothing but gather mushrooms and hunt creatures, while occasionally doing an odd job or something.

Edited on by KirbyTheVampire

KirbyTheVampire

Ralizah

@Spoony_Tech Yeah, it was a special experience. I really like how Nintendo gave a little twist to certain elements that also show up in plenty of other modern games. The post-apocalyptic setting, for example. It felt less like you were navigating the misery and wreckage of a destroyed world and more like you were exploring a world where nature has taken over the reigns again. In this way, it felt very Miyazaki-esque. A lot like Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, actually. Or how it opted for environmental interactivity and allowed the player to get lost in the wilderness ala Minecraft (which is, in my opinion, a closer analogue to the BotW experience than lore and quest heavy games like Skyrim).

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

Ralizah

KirbyTheVampire wrote:

Skyrim already did that. You have to go out and find everything yourself for it to show up on the map, save for locations that NPCs tell you about and mark on your map.

Sure. Fallout 3 did that before Skyrim. And I can't remember it very well, but Oblivion might very well have done that as well. It's definitely a better approach than a GTA or Far Cry game that seems to come preloaded with millions of icons. But, in the end, the game is still overloading your map with millions of icons once you visit locations. It becomes a nightmare of little symbols everywhere.

Just look at this!

BotW has markers, of course: primarily for fast travel points, like shrines, stables, and, of course, the game tells you where to head to find the divine beasts. But, beyond that, the map is just... a map. A map you can edit to your liking to mark interesting or memorable locations. Your map doesn't become nothing more than a conglomerate of little icons. It preserves the mystery and dignity of the landscape, and keeps the focus on the immediate landscape around you, but also allows you to maintain fast travel locations to make traveling wide distances feasible (because who wants to play giant games like these without some sort of fast travel option?).

KirbyTheVampire wrote:

That's not entirely true. IIRC, the ocean had an invisible wall, and there's usually a valley blocking you from continuing forward, which is effectively the same thing as the cliffs or mountains that block you in other open world games. It just looks different. Some open world games are definitely more restrictive than this, true, but games like Skyrim let you go wherever you want too, albeit more awkwardly in certain circumstances due to the lack of a climbing mechanic. Not exactly what I would call innovative, although it did accomplish this a lot more smoothly than most open world games.

You are, of course, perfectly correct that you will run into these barriers and messages if you travel far off enough from the map. Which is an unfortunate limitation. I only encountered these when I actually set out to break the game, though. Perhaps one day Nintendo will give us a perfectly open and interconnected game world where there are no boundaries!

Anyway, this is why I emphasized ease of movement and the ability to explore everywhere. You can probably go most places in Skyrim, but the game sure doesn't help you in this regard. I often feel like I'm fighting the controls and in-game physics engine to satiate my curiosity.

KirbyTheVampire wrote:

One could argue that Skyrim (again, lol) is similar in this case. Your goal is ultimately to stop Alduin, and since you start as a seemingly average person with no noteable skills, everything you do is making yourself stronger so that you can accomplish that goal.

The difference is the main plot stuff (correct me if I'm wrong here) is mandatory if you want to beat Skyrim. At least, outside of glitching into the endgame or something. You're going through a linear sequence of events to get from Point A to Point Z. After the tutorial, all you need to do to beat BotW is defeat Ganon. And, to that end, the path you forge on your way is uniquely your own.

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

Octane

@rallydefault It would be a rehash if they pretended it was a new game. It's a remake, and a very good-looking one too. It's one of my favourite games, so playing it in HD, with modern visuals and improved controls is pretty awesome. And it's a budget title too. I'm not complaining. The amount of remasters and remakes I buy every year are very few, if I even buy them at all, so I'm not too worried about the state of the industry. We got The Last Guardian last year, can't expect Ueda to develop a new game this fast. So the idea that a separate studio worked on a remake in the meantime doesn't bother me in the slightest. And when I look at my wishlist for next year, there are three new IPs (Concrete Genie, Days Gone, Ghost of Tsushima), and two sequels/reboots (God of War, Spider-Man).

I would be more worried about EA churning out a new FIFA every year since the beginning of time. It's not a new thing, annual releases, ports, remakes were a thing of the past too.

And to a certain degree we will see less creativity. There are only so many ideas and concepts that work as a video game. I don't believe the possibilities are endless. The first video game ever created was new and creative, everything they made back then was new and creative. Every game that followed was inspired by another in some way, shape or form. And the more games exist, the higher the chance that some mechanic or feature can be traced back to another game.

Octane

LuckyLand

Ralizah wrote:

The difference is the main plot stuff (correct me if I'm wrong here) is mandatory if you want to beat Skyrim. At least, outside of glitching into the endgame or something. You're going through a linear sequence of events to get from Point A to Point Z. After the tutorial, all you need to do to beat BotW is defeat Ganon. And, to that end, the path you forge on your way is uniquely your own.

And this is the reason why the path you forge in BOTW is a lot less interesting and memorable than anything else, be it Skyrim or older Zelda games or any other game with a main plot which is at least decent. You can forge your own path, but all the differences between those different paths will only be in the collectibles you get or other similarly unremarkables things that will never be good enough to replace an entertaining plot conceived by a human mind.

This is also why I love Oblivion so much, because when you put all the focus on well written side quests (many, MANY well written side quests) you are giving the player both interesting and memorable stories and the ability to choose which ones to follow, forging this way his own path but made of interesting and memorable things (when quests are SO MANY and so different from each other players really have the feeling that they are forging their own path even if they are actually only choosing from some predetermined options, it's the best compromise in my opinion)
At this point it doesn't count even the fact that the main quest in Oblivion is so bad that it can be compared to one of the uninteresting paths of Breath of the wild, because the game with the side quests already gave you much more than you could have asked for from a single main quest (a main quest that at this point becomes less than completely useless)

Edited on by LuckyLand

LuckyLand

rallydefault

@Octane
I know how they're marketing Colussus - I never questioned that. I'm just shaking my head that we have people labeling this as an "excellent" time in gaming when the majority of top-scoring and top-selling releases are HD upgrades/reskins of old games. Kind of like the movies currently. Most of your big-release movies right now are just remakes.

I don't know if video game ideas are endless. I really don't. On one hand, I kind of side with the people who defend video games as an art form. And if that's the case, ask any artist: Is visual art (painting, sculpture, etc.) limitless? Is writing limitless? Or have all the original ideas been expended? Chances are they're going to tell you that there are always new ideas.

At any rate I do think there's a lot out there to still be tried in video games, if not endless ideas. And if we keep moving on the trajectory the industry is on right now, we very well may never see those new possibilities. We're just going to keep seeing FIFA and DOOM and Mario and Assasin's Creed and Horizon and Last of Us just with slightly tweaked systems. That's all I'm saying.

@JaxonH
Absolutely I agree: a game simply being "new" or "creative" does NOT make it a good game. Plenty of terrible "creative" games out there, like you said. But they DO push gaming in new directions, and that's the crux of my argument. There have been plenty of failed "creative" games that other devs then came along and borrowed certain systems, tweaked, and turned into something very good. Without that terrible "creative" game in the first place, that growth would never occur.

It's like we say about Nintendo and their hardware. Some of it failed. Hard. But most of those hardware failures can then be traced into subsequent systems from Nintendo and other companies, borrowing the bits and pieces that DID work.

Edited on by rallydefault

rallydefault

skywake

rallydefault wrote:

I don't know if video game ideas are endless. I really don't. On one hand, I kind of side with the people who defend video games as an art form. And if that's the case, ask any artist: Is visual art (painting, sculpture, etc.) limitless? Is writing limitless? Or have all the original ideas been expended? Chances are they're going to tell you that there are always new ideas.

Or not. If anything they'll probably argue that there are only a few basic ideas that everything builds on. To use one example here are seven plots that every story can fit into:

1. Defeating the Monster (good vs evil)
2. Rags to Riches (Have nothing, win big, lose it all, earn it back)
3. Quest (get the thing)
4. Voyage (go somewhere, come back changed)
5. Comedy (an absurd scenario works out in the end)
6. Tragedy (a flaw/mistake is their undoing)
7. Rebirth (main character changes their ways)

In the same way styles of gameplay would fit into several broad categories. Styles of music fit into several broad categories. Styles of painting fit into several broad categories. Even when someone "invents" a new genre/style it's borrowed heavily from stuff that came before, consciously or not. Nothing "new" is really ever created it's just the same thing with variations in tone/quality/style re-mixed over and over again.

Edited on by skywake

Some good Aussie musics: King Gizzard, Pond, The Avalanches
"Don't stir the pot" is a nice way of saying "they're too dumb to reason with"

NaviAndMii

@rallydefault I actually think you make a very good point. One of the main reasons that I'm ever more drawn to the indie scene is that it seems to be the most reliable (arguably only) place where you can pick up something truly imaginative or creative.

Now for me, personally, I would rank this year pretty highly on my list of 'great years in gaming' - but there are a few caveats:

  • I got a new piece of hardware (Switch) that I really like, which doesn't happen every year
  • I didn't have a WiiU, so this year presented the first opportunity to play a game from the award-winning Splatoon series - which otherwise wouldn't have been all that fresh of an experience
  • I got to play the latest Mario Kart game (a 'deluxe' port of a WiiU game)
  • Having a new Mario and a new Zelda in the same year is pretty rare, so that was nice
  • I've been waiting for a Gran Turismo game for several years, so it was pleasing to finally get my hands on it

...when I factor in the indie games I've picked up to supplement my library, I'm left feeling very satisfied - but I can't deny that, when you take a wider view, there's not been all that much at the top end that's been truly different.

Splatoon 2 is a shooter with a twist - a twist that added something new for me - but, for returning players, it was (pretty much) more of the same. The biggest achievement in Zelda, as has been said, is probably the level of polish and consistency in the open world - was there anything all that different though? It could be argued not. Mario is (apparently) marvellous, but I haven't seen anything all that game-changing about it. Assassin's Creed is still Assassin's Creed. Gran Turismo is still Gran Turismo. FIFA is still FIFA. Call of Duty is still Call of Duty. Destiny is still Destiny. Sure, they all have little tweaks and twists here and there - but, underneath it all, they're still the same familiar franchises and formats that we've grown accustomed to.

There's creativity in the indie scene - and with games like PUBG which pop up on Early Access and capture peoples' imaginations - and, as seems to be the modern trend, the best ideas from these types of games will likely get ripped off and shoe-horned in to some of the bigger, more established franchises ..but, in the main, the major releases won't offer too much in the way of fresh, new experiences going forward - the risks are being taken elsewhere. Every now and again we might see something like ARMS crop up - which can go either way (Nintendo do seem more keen to take this type of risk than most other publishers in fairness to them) - but, on the whole, it seems that we're stuck in a cycle of having the same old tried-and-trusted titles re-packaged and re-sold to us time and time again!

As I said before, I've really (really, really) enjoyed my year in gaming - the Switch especially - but, hardware aside, I'm not sure I'll look back on 2017 as one of the most creative years in gaming history...lots of great experiences, but not much that's been all that fresh. I've enjoyed it a lot but, being objective, there have been other years that have 'changed the game' far more than this one - at least in terms of software.

...saying that though, I'll still be getting plenty of value out of Breath of the Wild, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, Splatoon 2, Stardew Valley, Overcooked, GT Sport etc long in to 2018 (and hopefully beyond) - and I'm really looking forward to finally picking up Mario Odyssey and DOOM (and perhaps returning to Skyrim and L.A. Noire as well) - so you won't find me complaining! ..I'd just welcome a few more risks here and there - from the bigger publishers especially.

Edited on by NaviAndMii

๐ŸŽฎ SNES ๐ŸŽฎ N64 ๐ŸŽฎ GB ๐ŸŽฎ GG ๐ŸŽฎ PC ๐ŸŽฎ PS2 ๐ŸŽฎ GC ๐ŸŽฎ PSP ๐ŸŽฎ Wii ๐ŸŽฎ X360 ๐ŸŽฎ PS4 ๐ŸŽฎ MDC ๐ŸŽฎ Switch ๐ŸŽฎ

Currently Playing (Online):

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KirbyTheVampire

@Ralizah Breath of the wild had markers on the map, too. Granted, it was less cluttered, but I could deal with the clutter in Skyrim, because it meant there was actually a bunch of stuff to find that wasn't just shrines. It's more a testament to the emptiness of BoTW than anything IMO.

As for the story, that is true that you need to do a linear path to beat the game. I think you would be missing the best part of BoTW if you skipped the story, though. It basically becomes a survival game with shrines. But yes, that is something that other games don't generally do.

KirbyTheVampire

skywake

NaviAndMii wrote:

I've enjoyed it a lot but, being objective, there have been other years that have 'changed the game' far more than this one - at least in terms of software.

I don't understand why there's even a desire for new releases to "change the game". For me I'd argue that Overwatch is fairly comfortably my favourite game of the last 5-10 years. What did that game do that was actually new? Probably not a lot. It's just an extremely well polished release. In the same way that Super Mario Odyssey is and Super Mario Galaxy was.

Even Arms and Splatoon which you cited as examples of innovative releases are still heavily borrowing from other games. Arms is not the first 3D fighting game, Splatoon is not the first team based shooter. They've both got reasonably unique mechanics for sure but so does Super Mario Odyssey. So what are we actually talking about when we say "new ideas" here? Are we just talking about the character in the box-art?

Some good Aussie musics: King Gizzard, Pond, The Avalanches
"Don't stir the pot" is a nice way of saying "they're too dumb to reason with"

JaxonH

Ya I never understood grading games or satisfaction solely on how "new" or "creative" it was.

Creative =/= Satisfaction
Uncreative =/= Dissatisfaction

I never have, and never will, use those labels to define my entertainment experience. I just play good games. Some are new, some are not. Some are sequels, some are ports. Some are creative, some use existing ideas in new ways. But whatever the case, there are only two kinds of games in the world- good games and bad games. That's it.

I don't have to have a completely "new" experience every time I play a game to have fun. Because they all feel new to me. If I haven't played it, then it's new. Open world games have been done to death-still love Skyrim. It's new to me. Still love Zelda. It's new to me. FPS have been done to death. Still love DOOM. It's new to me. Still love Wolfenstein. It's new to me. Even the sequel is new to me. Because it's not the same as the first game. Therefore > new.

This has absolutely been the best year in the history of video games. I'm sure you can run it through a variety of filters and spit out an unfavorable result- oh it's not the most creative year. Ok, sure. Oh it had the least amount of new IP Ok, sure. Oh it was this or that, or wasn't this or that. Ok, sure.

But at the end of the day, there were more great games this year than any year in memory, and of those great games more that sit in my top 20 than any other year, and higher up the list at that.

PLAYING
Switch: Xenoblade 2, Skyrim, Resident Evil Revelations 1/2
New 3DS:
PS4 Pro:
PSVR: Skyrim VR, DOOM VFR
Vita:
X1X: Wolfenstein 2
PC:

Jesus is Lord.

3DS Friend Code: 1160-9763-9374 | Nintendo Network ID: JaxonH

NaviAndMii

@skywake Well, I often cite Rocket League as my 'game of the decade' (so far) ..sure, you could just put it in the 'sports game' box if you like - but I'd argue that the mix of physics, skill, tactics, teamwork, co-operation, communication (with its level playing field and the addition of cross-network play) separates it sufficiently from anything that we've seen before to really set it apart.

I don't think a game necessarily has to be in a genre of its own to be considered a creative, original experience (I'm not imaginative enough to think of a genre that hasn't already been done!) ..I just feel that the majority of major releases either just take their established mechanics and put them in a new setting (eg. Assassin's Creed) - take established mechanics and return to an old setting (eg. CoD) - or take an established idea and execute it with a high level of polish (eg. Breath of the Wild) ..there's no problem with that as such - I just think that, among the bigger players in the industry, there's perhaps an over-reliance on the 'tried and trusted' when they could perhaps find a better balance - rely a bit less on the established stuff and take a few more risks here-and-there.

Nintendo are still pretty good at doing that - they managed to establish a new top-tier IP in Splatoon by taking a bit of a creative risk - I'd just like to see a bit more of that across the industry as a whole...we have too many re-hashes and remakes when, with the resources available at these huge power-house publishers, they could perhaps try a few different things and see if something sticks. I do love seeing a genre of game taken to another level, like we've seen in Overwatch and Breath of the Wild - but it's the 'out of the box' stuff that really excites, and I think we could perhaps see a bit more of that from the bigger players in the industry.

@JaxonH I never said that I was in any way 'dissatisfied' with the year in gaming - I actually said the exact opposite - I just feel that, if I'm being hyper-critical, there was one area where 2017 probably came up a little short and that was on the 'creative' side of things. If we have another year where we get some shiny new consoles and highly polished games - but with a few more top draw titles that really stand out as something fresh and exciting - it'll surpass 2017.

Edited on by NaviAndMii

๐ŸŽฎ SNES ๐ŸŽฎ N64 ๐ŸŽฎ GB ๐ŸŽฎ GG ๐ŸŽฎ PC ๐ŸŽฎ PS2 ๐ŸŽฎ GC ๐ŸŽฎ PSP ๐ŸŽฎ Wii ๐ŸŽฎ X360 ๐ŸŽฎ PS4 ๐ŸŽฎ MDC ๐ŸŽฎ Switch ๐ŸŽฎ

Currently Playing (Online):

PS4: GT Sport (DR: D, SR: S)

Switch: Mario Kart 8 DX (R: 8500, B: 2000) | Splatoon 2 (Lvl: 46, RM: A-, SZ: B+, TC: A)

Switch Nickname: TomCatโ˜…

Switch Friend Code: SW-0427-7196-3801 | My Nintendo: NaviAndMii

Caldorosso-E

I do not think games are art, but what you put in a game can be artistic (Systems, Art, Story, Music). So while PAC-MAN is a fantastic game, it's not really art. Same with BoTW, which is filled to the brim with art, but you can't say that the actual "play" of BoTW is art.

I can make an awesome game of D&D, write music, plan a story, and draw/mold my own figures, but actually playing D&D is just a game.

With that, built on the axiom that art is a creative expression of the human condition, there is no limit to what we can create. There's an infinite potential to remix the 7 stories and how we tell them.

Creativity is linked to the human soul, and therefore can't be boxed. Think for instance, Splatoon. There's been many 3rd person shooters, but none with the idea of using shooting to increase movement. It's all about a cycle of shooting -> movement. That's all shooters, but only Splatoon organically blended them.

There had been platformers before Mario, there had been adventures before Zelda. There's not going to be a shortage any time soon, but it'll take people less interested in selling a product and more willing to experiment, which is impossible for a company to do all the time.

Love all, trust a few, do harm to none.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSAJ0l4OBHM
-Verified Cheese Aficionado and Abecedarian Author-

JaxonH

@NaviAndMii

If we have another year where we get some shiny new consoles and highly polished games - but with a few more titles that really stand out as something different - it'll surpass 2017

Oh I certainly don't think so. Too many truly excellent games this year. I don't see any year matching this one for some time.

PLAYING
Switch: Xenoblade 2, Skyrim, Resident Evil Revelations 1/2
New 3DS:
PS4 Pro:
PSVR: Skyrim VR, DOOM VFR
Vita:
X1X: Wolfenstein 2
PC:

Jesus is Lord.

3DS Friend Code: 1160-9763-9374 | Nintendo Network ID: JaxonH

NintenNinja16

Dark Blue colored Joy Cons got leaked by accident in the new Nintendo Minute video, you can see them in the left corner by all the other joy cons at 5:19.

Youโ€™re able to tell too that these definetly arenโ€™t the double neon blue pack since the neon blue/neon red pack is also in the shot, and while the dark blue joy cons are visible and the lighting changes they stay the same dark blue.

Knack 2 tha future
#ErnieGang

NaviAndMii

@JaxonH Let me put it this way: if you have a year when you get to go on holiday to (for example) Japan, Brazil, New Zealand, Norway and Egypt - chances are that year is going to feel pretty damn special! ..but if you have a year when you get to go to the Moon, it's really going to stand out!

I don't think that anyone would deny that 2017 has given us many exceptional experiences - considerably above average, that's for sure! ..but, for some, they may not feel that a game 'took them to the Moon' this year - and I can kind of understand that perspective, that's all

Edited on by NaviAndMii

๐ŸŽฎ SNES ๐ŸŽฎ N64 ๐ŸŽฎ GB ๐ŸŽฎ GG ๐ŸŽฎ PC ๐ŸŽฎ PS2 ๐ŸŽฎ GC ๐ŸŽฎ PSP ๐ŸŽฎ Wii ๐ŸŽฎ X360 ๐ŸŽฎ PS4 ๐ŸŽฎ MDC ๐ŸŽฎ Switch ๐ŸŽฎ

Currently Playing (Online):

PS4: GT Sport (DR: D, SR: S)

Switch: Mario Kart 8 DX (R: 8500, B: 2000) | Splatoon 2 (Lvl: 46, RM: A-, SZ: B+, TC: A)

Switch Nickname: TomCatโ˜…

Switch Friend Code: SW-0427-7196-3801 | My Nintendo: NaviAndMii

rallydefault

Well, this discussion has moved pretty far afield from what I was actually saying. @JaxonH, you seem unwilling to actually acknowledge what I've said and instead keep drawling this line of "creative doesn't equal good," which I've said I agreed with you, so I don't know what's going on there.

@NaviAndMii
Yes - good points! I have to say, in terms of creativity, the Switch is obviously the high point of the year and does give me hope. Let's face it: Sony or Microsoft weren't going to come out with something like this if Nintendo wasn't still in the race. They would've just continued their power war until the end of days. Nintendo really changed the ecosystem with the Switch, and for that I'm grateful.

@skywake
Now, skywake, you're a different issue. You've opened a whole world of possibilities with me lol. I'm a literature teacher currently writing my thesis for my master's in literature (focus on mythemes present through structural and psychoanalytic criticism), and you're not wrong that lots of people think there are basic structures in our arts and stories. Though your categories are relatively distant/slightly changed from the academic descriptors, you're not too far off base in showing some of the general genres stories have slotted into over the years.

But not every scholar or artist out there believes this is it. Far from it. There's a big trend in the last decade, actually, of literary critics "flipping the script" (ha) and viewing things in different lights and suggesting that there is much out there for us to still discover. Moreso many critics now believe that stories don't slot neatly into one "genre" or another, but instead blend many to create something unique, exactly what I'm saying needs to happen more with video gaming.

But this is not the place to discuss that sort of stuff lol - this is where I come to relax and see what you guys (many of whom I respect greatly) think about the current video game news.

Anyway, whole new video game genres do emerge. Just look at MMOs. When I was growing up, MMOs weren't a thing. You had a few MUDs in the mid 90s (around SNES time), but until stuff like EQ and Ultima (1997-99) started development, the genre didn't exist. That's an entire genre. I'm just talking about games.And as much as I'm hesitant to jump on board, I think virtual reality may lead to some interesting discoveries.

Edited on by rallydefault

rallydefault

Octane

@rallydefault MMOs have always been a thing since the internet became mainstream. They were text-based back in the day, but the genre itself isn't new, at least not newer than other genres. And I would say it's hardly a genre, more a way of delivering the game. You can turn any genre into an MMO.

Octane

JaxonH

@rallydefault
What I'm unwilling to accept is that it wasn't an absolutely incredible year for games. No more, no less.

Think I said several times above I didn't necessarily disagree about it not being the most creative (not that I agree or disagree, I just don't care enough to challenge the notion so I'll let you have that). But what does that matter if even you admit it doesn't mean games aren't good.

It was an amazing year for games, and all I'm hearing all around is "no it wasn't"

PLAYING
Switch: Xenoblade 2, Skyrim, Resident Evil Revelations 1/2
New 3DS:
PS4 Pro:
PSVR: Skyrim VR, DOOM VFR
Vita:
X1X: Wolfenstein 2
PC:

Jesus is Lord.

3DS Friend Code: 1160-9763-9374 | Nintendo Network ID: JaxonH

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