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Topic: Things you want Nintendo to add/fix with the NES app

Posts 21 to 40 of 43

Haywired

GameOtaku wrote:

How do you think we figured things out? We used trial and error.

And instruction manuals...

Haywired

GameOtaku

@subpopz
I disagree completely. New games hold your hand way to much and lots force you to complete a tutorial before actually jumping in to the meat and potatoes of the actual game, some you actually have to complete the way they want you to.

GameOtaku

MasterJay

@GameOtaku those tutorials actually allow you to understand the game. And for things like zelda, they would want you to play with the manual, as without you would go through the game without having any idea about the story and why you're doing what you are, which takes all the fun out of these games, so, you're wrong again....

Well excuuuse me princess

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gcunit

MasterJay wrote:

@GameOtaku those tutorials actually allow you to understand the game. And for things like zelda, they would want you to play with the manual, as without you would go through the game without having any idea about the story and why you're doing what you are, which takes all the fun out of these games, so, you're wrong again....

QFT.

Manuals.
Full screen display option.
Toggle for the in-game 'SELECT - START - Suspend' overlay.
Rewind button (a la the SNK 40th Anniversary Collection).

What better way to celebrate than firing something out of the pipe?

Nothing is true. Everything is permitted.

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1UP_MARIO

@GameOtaku I wouldn’t say they hold your hands. They just make it more accessible for everyone. You can still play hard or easy. More options is good

We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.

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GameOtaku

@MasterJay
If you don't press start on a lot of nes games a story summary pops up such as in Zelda, Ninja Gaiden, Castevania 2 and 3 off the top do.

Personally I believe most modern games have gotten way to easy so that when going to older games you expect them to have more than what they originally had. Correct me if I'm wrong but did the Metroid manual have a map? I don't think it did. I know NP had maps for it though.

GameOtaku

OfNullAndVoid

@GameOtaku Metroid had a map in its manual. Just look up NES Metroid Manual and you'll see. It's not comprehensive, but it helps give the player an idea of where to go, without revealing everything. The manual also gives information on upgrades and enemies, which may also help the player out.

Personally, I miss manuals because of all that extra information, as well as the artwork included. Now you tend to have to get "special editions" to maybe get a book of art.

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HobbitGamer

So somehow this devolved into two points:
1) manuals/instructions are the old way of doing things, get over it
2) why can’t i buy old games like I used to, I can’t get over it

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#MeatAndGreet

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Haywired

I'd like to think that people who are too cool/awesome/intelligent/tough/etc. to look at instruction manuals spent their whole gaming lives constantly missing out on valuable bits of information that they would have otherwise known. I don't know why they have such a weird insecurity/shame associated with having their hand held, just from reading some handy information provided. Not to mention the fact that, manuals also often contained extra artwork, that back in the pre-Internet days, was a lot harder to come by, so it meant something.

Sure, NES games were generally very simplistic, so they weren't always essential there, but anything after that (up until nowadays where manuals/tutorials are embedded into the games themselves) manuals were where that important information was. I mean, if you played Street Fighter 2 back in the day, there was no way that you would just be able to guess, or work out through trial and error, that to perform a Hadouken you do a quarter circle on the D-pad, then punch, or to perform a Sonic Boom you hold left on the D-pad for two seconds, right, then punch. You had to look in the instruction manual, where they told you how to perform each character's special moves. Nowadays that information is in the game, but back then it was in the manual.

In fact, on the subject of NES games, the original NES Zelda is often used by wannabe tough guys online (trying to impress/embarrass the young-uns) as an example of a game that had no information, no map, no guidance, no hand-holding, etc. when in actual fact, the game came with a map that not only showed the location of the dungeons, but the order of the first four. They seem to forget this (which suggests they're not quite the hyper-intelligent beings they claim to be).

Untitled

Haywired

GameOtaku

@Haywired
My copy of Zelda on nes was new and it didn't have that comprehensive of a map. BOTW at its core does exactly what the original did. It rewards exploration. I still find it astonishing lots beg for retro manuals but no manuals in newer games? I wonder how many of you play etrian since you have to draw out your own maps.

GameOtaku

Hikingguy

If it was in the box, with the game, or is any part of the original packaging or experience, it should be in the app to the best the digital experience allows.

To keep the experience as authentic as possible I would prefer a manual and even a box scan with each game the NES app releases. I would even say to include some Nintendo Power strategy guides if the game was featured in the magazine. This would add to the authenticity of the era Nintendo is try to create. If a person wanted to ignore it, feel free never to look at it. But for those who want it, it is there.

As to this manual or no manual conversation. It seems like making a mountain out of a mole hill. Simple additions are easily ignored, but are still more then welcome. However, more is not always better. Too many choices can be overwhelming. There is a reason companies like McDonalds have simplified their menu. (I do not endorse McDonalds)
BOTW is a great example of why a manual is not necessarily needed for modern games, yet after playing 300+ hours I decided to buy that Zelda guide. As much as playing that game organically teaches what is needed to succeed, there is just so much content in BOTW that some info in the guide really helps. The book shows details that simple trial and error would take forever to figure out.
Some games are so simple in nature, run, gun, shoot, like Contra that a manual is only superficially helpful. One look at the manual and all is understood. No unnecessary guessing is needed.
But more complex games can and should utilized the manual. Well written manuals could potentially keep me interested in a game because without the manual I might be totally unaware of an item that I did not yet have, but might really want to find. Or small details within the manual that the creators of the game knew might be super helpful or even necessary to help with strategy.

Sure, many things can be figured out with trial and error, but there was a reason the original creators of the game utilized the standard of the era and included manuals with nearly every game.

Hikingguy

CharlieGirl

for the life of me, I cannot fathom how someone can be so vehemently opposed to anything that makes games more accessible for more people.

I'll be your 1up girl

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HobbitGamer

Oh man, now I wished they had a service with digital versions of all the Nintendo Power issues. That’d be neat.

#TeamPineapple
#MeatAndGreet

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Hikingguy

Nintendo Power was such a large part of that era, why Nintendo has not leveraged that is beyond me.
A podcast is only minimally leveraging the nostalgia they could. Somehow tying the articles in the magazine to the games would be really nice touch.

Hikingguy

Yorumi

GameOtaku wrote:

@subpopz As far as maps are concerned maybe try what we had to do back then, graph paper and pencil! Although the pen and paper are dated by today's standards they are still an invaluable resource for situations such as this!

I do so much retro gaming(on original hardware), that I actually bought a nice journal with dot paper as a retro notebook. It's not that this information isn't readily available on the internet but it's fun to map out dungeons and take notes and stuff. Besides dungeons I do thinks like go through a megaman game and write down boss weaknesses, write a useful password here or there(I usually just do wily or similar). In mario games I'll map out the various maze levels, in RPGs I'll list the levels various characters get spells. It's just kind of a general purpose note book and it's really fun, both to make and to go back through from time to time and just look at it.

Yorumi

Nintendo Network ID: yorumi

GameOtaku

@Yorumi
This person gets it.

And let's look at the drip feed of games. 410 across wiiu/3ds and just a little over 20 on this service. If tgey were starting only with the nes why not just dump every VC nes game released thus far on wiiu/3ds to switch?

GameOtaku

HobbitGamer

@Yorumi That does sound neat. I try to stay away from notebooks when I can, because I’ve got 5 full of handwritten backup code for SQL reports for work 😂
I do have the items IDs and console commands for Ark written down on a random sheet somewhere.

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#MeatAndGreet

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Yorumi

@GameOtaku @JackEatsSparrows I have basically a whole retro game room in my house now so the notebook fits in well there. I'm sure I'll have more as I go through more and more games. It's fun as you're making it because you're doing things like mapping out dungeons Etrian Odyssey style, in the case of megaman using trial and error to figure out the boss weaknesses and such and slowly building the list as you play. When you go back to the games and look something up the notes aren't just on some website that someone else made they're your notes, in your handwriting. And of course it's fun to just look through it because it sort of becomes a gaming log, a history of your gaming. As cheesy as it sounds it's kind of fun thinking of how I have this room with consoles and then The Book, the one with all the secrets that I made.

I highly recommend it. Journals aren't expensive. I prefer dot paper because it functions both like graph paper and line paper at once. I also kicked it up a bit because I got a set of colored markers for inking things in or color coding things. I do everything in pencil first and go back and ink stuff in later. It's an extra step but that's mostly because I like the book being an archive. It really brings new enjoyment to these games for me because i'm not just going and looking up all the answers, I'm figuring them out myself and writing them down.

Yorumi

Nintendo Network ID: yorumi

Alantor28

JackEatsSparrows wrote:

So somehow this devolved into two points:
1) manuals/instructions are the old way of doing things, get over it
2) why can’t i buy old games like I used to, I can’t get over it

I just stumble upon this thread and I had to facepalm at the way GameOtaku is ranting. I'll say I want more NES games added to the NES App, everything else is fine.

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PSN: MMX20

Switch Friend Code: SW-6488-5483-0698

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