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Topic: Violence in Video Games

Showing 41 to 60 of 69

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WhiteNoise17

41. Posted:

justlink wrote:

Funny, I literally wrote a research paper on this just last month (scored an 86) and a quote i used mostly said unless your child has issues, he/she is most likely not going to turn to real world violence because of violent games

Actually I did one last year with a couple of friends one the same topic.

but anyway it seems that the general consensus was it depends on the person. personally when I was younger I was terrified of halloween and gore to the point of screaming in fear at walmart halloween aisles and horror movies and as I grew older I did things to break that fear like playing scary games (majora's mask because of the masks) to where i'm at now playing anything liking horror movies and standing gore but to be honest it gets boring decapitating and shooting heads. That being said the Mario series is my favorite of all time and I usually stick to T rated as my main rating but feel no shame in going to E sometimes. The only rated M games I like are Halo, Resident Evil, Devil May Cry, GTA and generally anything with a sword.

So to sum all that up gore affects certain people they know it and while kids shouldn't play them I understand why they want to, curiosity when my dad played Die Hard on the PS1 I always wanted to try its just kinda natural. So gore isn't causing world chaos its just over used and boring now.

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Zombie_Barioth

42. Posted:

Games are like any other medium, and should ve treated as such. I don't believe they cause violence of any sort when treated appropriately but can be a trigger for those who are unable to process it properly, be it too young/immature for the material or mental issues.

Unfortunately, many parents don't treat games like any other medium. If you wouldn't let your kid watch an R-rated movie why would you let them play an M-rated game? Even if you ignore the "M" its still rated 17+. The "its just a game" mentality is just too prevalent, I'm all for using your best judgement but from my experience a lot of parents just end up buying whatever game their kids want to make them happy. They are "just games" but the content in many M-rated games is still equal to, at the very least, programs like Friday the 13th or the Walking Dead and should be treated with the same care. Some movies push the R rating for all its worth while some barely deserve it (Zombieland comes to mind here) and games are the same way.

Edited on by Zombie_Barioth

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shaneoh

43. Posted:

iKhan wrote:

shaneoh wrote:

If people make violent decisions on what they see in video game, then they are already mentally disturbed and should not have had access to any form of violent media, books, tv, games etc.

A lot of the time it is parents trying to blame something other than their poor parenting for their child misbehaving/committing felonies.

Well crap, I make pretty messed up decisions in some of my business sims...

This is relevant
http://www.dorkly.com/post/55347/5-games-that-actually-prove-...

What I meant was that killing things in video games is fine, but a person thinking that killing something in real life is okay just because they did it in a game is a person who shouldn't have access in media. Seriously, who hasn't built a death coast in RCT or drowned a sim for the fun of it? I couldn't afford to build a roller coaster, let alone kill anyone with one.

The only one of those things I haven't done is the Oregon Trail one

shaneoh

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shaneoh

44. Posted:

Zombie_Barioth wrote:

Unfortunately, many parents don't treat games like any other medium. If you wouldn't let your kid watch an R-rated movie why would you let them play an M-rated game?

Before VG ratings and regulations my parents (particularly my father) would allow me to play a strip poker VG. I turned out fine. It's a matter of whether the kid can handle it, I could, never even played a real (for money) game of poker, let alone a strip variety... I'm not sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing haha

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Dave24

45. Posted:

The most important thing is to actually explain what is going on and why you should or should not do, not "let the TV babysit my child". Some people say "media doesn't have infulence on children", which is not true.

What is funny to me is that people think "violence" in any media is the worst offender, but the truth is, you can utterly destroy and scar your kid for life even with something like Toy Story. I'm dead serious.

I liked my time with Quake 2, Doom, Blood, Soldier of Fortune and Shadow Warrior or watching movies like Robocop with permition of parents as kid and I think I turned out fine, because they KNEW what they were doing.

Partially media could be the "thing", but not the reason that someone turned out doing killing spree - it is the bad parenting and just being rejected by society and frustrated by it, but of course "smart" media psychologists or whatever base their opinions that "games = killers, murderers, rapist" on nothing other than "it is easier to blame the thing which won't defend itself than parents".

I mean, there were killing sprees in schools even in 1920's and 30's.

Dave24

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SpookyMeths

46. Posted:

I think there may be a problem in how young the market for violence is skewing and the lack of enforcement of the ESRB/PEGI rating.

Not relating to video games, but there was a study recently about how PG-13 films are now more violent than R rated films in terms of gun violence. It makes sense when you think of it too. The most popular movies these days all feature loads and loads of gun violence. None of it is particularly graphic, but it's there. These are products designed to be consumed by an impressionable audience.

A major problem in America though is just how little parents care and pay attention to what their children are playing or watching. Simulated violence isn't particularly harmful to children as long as their parents have taught them that there's a difference between video games and real life. Mental health is also a major factor being ignored. Whenever something tragic like a school shooting happens, video games are always the big media scapegoat, but few people in charge ever ask damning questions about parenting or mental health. It's just easier to blame a video game and have a big talk about gun control that ends in nothing.

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iKhan

47. Posted:

I love asking these questions on game forums because you get such an intelligent conversation.

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Jaz007

48. Posted:

I don't understand anyone who says ESRB is too strict on Sex considering the Sims and some of JRPGs that get rated T. I see a good number of T rated JRPGs get a reviewer to talk about being uncomfortable with how off color and perverted it is at times than a lot of M rated games get talked about with a similar rating regarding sexuality. They definitely aren't too strict on violence either.
I also see a lot of things online that are false assumptions about the ESRB, they blame things that aren't even taken into consideration or some T games clearly have.

Edited on by Jaz007

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unrandomsam

49. Posted:

Jaz007 wrote:

I don't understand anyone who says ESRB is too strict on Sex considering the Sims and some of JRPGs that get rated T. I see a good number of T rated JRPGs get a reviewer to talk about being uncomfortable with how off color and perverted it is at times than a lot of M rated games get talked about with a similar rating regarding sexuality. They definitely aren't too strict on violence either.
I also see a lot of things online that are false assumptions about the ESRB, they blame things that aren't even taken into consideration or some T games clearly have.

The difference is sex shouldn't be an issue in anything. (I draw the line at stuff like Rape Simulators).

Violence on the other hand might be for the really young.

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SomeBitTripFan

50. Posted:

I'll just add my two cents. I can't explain my exact ideas well right now, so I'll just ask a few questions. Do games encourage a certain mindset from the player? Games tend to employ a reward mechanic, what is the reward given to a player in a violent video game? Being able to distinguish fantasy from reality is definitely a key to preventing people from becoming violent from video games, but when games try to make themselves real to the player, just how much can one make the distinction?

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CanisWolfred

51. Posted:

iKhan wrote:

I love asking these questions on game forums because you get such an intelligent conversation.

I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not, but I'm going to assume so and say "this".

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iKhan

52. Posted:

CanisWolfred wrote:

iKhan wrote:

I love asking these questions on game forums because you get such an intelligent conversation.

I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not, but I'm going to assume so and say "this".

So I'm actually being serious. You hear this topic brought up in the news so much, that the conversation between Fox and Gamers is just agonizingly stupid.

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Zombie_Barioth

53. Posted:

shaneoh wrote:

Zombie_Barioth wrote:

Unfortunately, many parents don't treat games like any other medium. If you wouldn't let your kid watch an R-rated movie why would you let them play an M-rated game?

Before VG ratings and regulations my parents (particularly my father) would allow me to play a strip poker VG. I turned out fine. It's a matter of whether the kid can handle it, I could, never even played a real (for money) game of poker, let alone a strip variety... I'm not sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing haha

Well to be fair, before VG ratings games were mostly 2D and sprite-based. The graphical detail for a game like that now would be far different from one then. I never said I was against younger players playing M-rated games though, just that many parents don't give them the same level of attention as movies or television. They just don't take the time to understand the medium their kids are watching, then if/when something goes wrong they get upset and blame video games.

Sadly, the only time people pay much attention to it is when they're in the headlines and suddenly they cause violence and other negative behavior.

Zombie_Barioth

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shaneoh

54. Posted:

Was actually supporting your statement :)

shaneoh

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Zombie_Barioth

55. Posted:

shaneoh wrote:

Was actually supporting your statement :)

Oh. Whoops, I was going by the part you quoted so I ended up reading it as a counter-argument.:$

Zombie_Barioth

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ZB42

56. Posted:

SomeBitTripFan wrote:

I'll just add my two cents. I can't explain my exact ideas well right now, so I'll just ask a few questions. Do games encourage a certain mindset from the player? Games tend to employ a reward mechanic, what is the reward given to a player in a violent video game? Being able to distinguish fantasy from reality is definitely a key to preventing people from becoming violent from video games, but when games try to make themselves real to the player, just how much can one make the distinction?

The violence is the reward. Mortal Kombat Fatalities are the perfect example of that.

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CanisWolfred

57. Posted:

Mortal Kombat's more of an extreme example, and it's arguable that the violence portrayed is rewarding simply because it's as over the top and unrealistic as possible. Last I checked, a person can't rip a person's still-beating heart out of their chest. There's kind of a rib cage to prevent that. It's so violent that it's silly, which separates it from true violence.

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ZB42

58. Posted:

CanisWolfred wrote:

Mortal Kombat's more of an extreme example, and it's arguable that the violence portrayed is rewarding simply because it's as over the top and unrealistic as possible. Last I checked, a person can't rip a person's still-beating heart out of their chest. There's kind of a rib cage to prevent that. It's so violent that it's silly, which separates it from true violence.

Most people can make that kind of distinction. However, the recent stabbing of a 12 yr old by her friends so they could meet Slenderman says that some people are receptive to some media that is clearly fictional.

Let's look at the Original Goldeneye for the N64. Did you ever shoot an enemy in the butt or the groin? It was hysterical. That was in essence a reward mechanism. In Perfect Dark on the N64 shooting someone in the head next to a wall left a blood splatter. The gore is the reward for your effort. Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 has the Kill Cam. Seeing the results of the brutality you are able to cause is the reward in violent video games. It's not all for realism.

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Zizzy

59. Posted:

Violence is necessary in some games, sometimes it's part of the story or message behind the game. There's really no need to avoid violence in games, or shun it or anything. All you have to do is make sure you yourself are mentally stable enough to handle violence in video games. It only becomes a problem when people can't handle it or are easily influenced by it. In which case, don't play the game. For the latter, maybe don't play video games at all if something virtual can influence your physical reality.

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Gioku

60. Posted:

Untitled
(Retro City Rampage had some commentary on this subject in it, I just remembered. That was one of my favorite things in the game!)

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