General Discussion Forum

Topic: Japan Discussion

Showing 761 to 780 of 833

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

761. Posted:

BEGIN Japanology was on tonight! This week's theme was Ukiyo-e paintings.

Ukiyo-e paintings start out as a series of wood blocks that have intricate images carved into them, each one with a different colored ink assigned to it (a series, for one painting, can take 2 months to create). Once carved, a piece of paper is applied to the blocks one at a time, until the entire image is transferred onto it (this may only take about an hour, as they can be mass produced).

They were produced as inexpensive art for the average citizen. Popular subjects for painting were beautiful women (liked by male customers for thier beauty, and liked by female customers for thier depictions of the latest fashion trends), Kabuki actors (they'd even produce prints honoring a deceased actor, as a way of spreding the news to fans), and natural landmarks (these were popular because Japanese people were starting to travel for leisure at the time, and some copies would even be annotated, to be used as travel guides).

They first appeared in the 17th century, and were initially only made with solely black ink (since it was expensive & time consuming to color them), but in the early 18th century, new techniques were developed that made color prints easy to develop, and their popularity spread. Their popularity began to fall in the late 19th century, when western culture was becoming popular, but they were first exhibitioned in Europe at this time, inspiring famous artists such as Van Gough & Monét.

Recently, a set of wood blocks belonging to a famous 19th century Ukiyo-e artist were discovered (and authenticated). They were restored, and all new prints were produced using them. The new copies revealed some surprising new intricacies that have been lost in the originals (due to color saturation).

Meanwhile, in the historic Nihonbashi neighborhood of Tokyo, they've started revitalizing youth interest in the area by recreating famous Ukiyo-e works on the walls & shutters of businesses. When the shops close, it's almost like an open air museum of sorts. The project started in 2006 (with the city government giving the project funding since 2009), and there are now 26 paintings throughout the neighborhood, with more planned.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Fikachu

762. Posted:

RR529 wrote:

BEGIN Japanology was on tonight! This week's theme was Ukiyo-e paintings.

Ukiyo-e paintings start out as a series of wood blocks that have intricate images carved into them, each one with a different colored ink assigned to it (a series, for one painting, can take 2 months to create). Once carved, a piece of paper is applied to the blocks one at a time, until the entire image is transferred onto it (this may only take about an hour, as they can be mass produced).

They were produced as inexpensive art for the average citizen. Popular subjects for painting were beautiful women (liked by male customers for thier beauty, and liked by female customers for thier depictions of the latest fashion trends), Kabuki actors (they'd even produce prints honoring a deceased actor, as a way of spreding the news to fans), and natural landmarks (these were popular because Japanese people were starting to travel for leisure at the time, and some copies would even be annotated, to be used as travel guides).

They first appeared in the 17th century, and were initially only made with solely black ink (since it was expensive & time consuming to color them), but in the early 18th century, new techniques were developed that made color prints easy to develop, and their popularity spread. Their popularity began to fall in the late 19th century, when western culture was becoming popular, but they were first exhibitioned in Europe at this time, inspiring famous artists such as Van Gough & Monét.

Recently, a set of wood blocks belonging to a famous 19th century Ukiyo-e artist were discovered (and authenticated). They were restored, and all new prints were produced using them. The new copies revealed some surprising new intricacies that have been lost in the originals (due to color saturation).

Meanwhile, in the historic Nihonbashi neighborhood of Tokyo, they've started revitalizing youth interest in the area by recreating famous Ukiyo-e works on the walls & shutters of businesses. When the shops close, it's almost like an open air museum of sorts. The project started in 2006 (with the city government giving the project funding since 2009), and there are now 26 paintings throughout the neighborhood, with more planned.

I remember reading about Ukiyo-e in my online Art History class

[url=http://www.mybannermaker.com][/url]

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

763. Posted:

Journeys in Japan was on tonight! In what's the most interesting episode thus far, they went to the city of Iga.

The host of the episode was William Reed, an American who is a master in the Aikido martial art, who went to Iga to learn about the city's long ninja history.

Nowadays it's just a quiet mountain town with a population of around 100,000, but up to even just 100 years ago, this city was widely associated with ninja. You see, during Japan's "Warring States" era, the region's warriors gathered here because it was surrounded by mountains on all sides (which are often draped in a thick fog), meaning it was hard for enemies to attack, and easy for them to launch surprise attacks. Over time, they became famous for their stealthy fighting techniques, and nobles from the nearby capital of Kyoto hired them out for spying missions. They had a long history, with documents confirming they were active until at least the 1860's, with evidence that the Shogun had hired them to spy inside the American warships that forced the country out of isolationism.

Of course, some modern day residents of the city are direct descendents of ninja clans, with official paperwork to proove it. Such documents include information about various jobs they were hired to take on, or special techniques that needed to be secretly passed on. The most important of which was the instructions to make gunpowder, which made the people of the time think they had supernatural abilities (which has influenced their depiction in modern pop culture). Some of the tools they developed with this gunpowder, were flairs used to communicate with one another, and special torches that were resistant to water.

Certain members of the community have still passed on the Ninjutsu martial arts, with our host being allowed to take part in the training. They showed off their prowess with various weapons (like the popular throwing star), but trained shinobi can use almost anything as a weapon, such as chopsticks (which they effortlessly imbeded into a wooden plank with a flick of their wrist) and decorative braided ribbon (which can be used to disarm armed opponents, in the right hands). They also showed the host some of the footwork techniques that were developed to walk quietly, while keeping an eye on your surroundings. They also endure harsh training such as mountain climbing & meditating under waterfalls (which were actually inherited from a sect of nature worship, where it was believed you could obtain superhuman strength & senses by becoming one with nature via these methods).

The host then tried out some of the local cuisine, such as the famous "Iga Beef". It's actually regarded just as highly as "Kobe Beef", but is harder to come by as not much of it is produced, and it's mostly consumed locally.

If tourists want to visit the area, you'll be happy to know that their is a real ninja house here that has been perfectly reserved, where guests can see all the clever trap doors & secret passages that were actually used by the former residents here. There is also the Iga Ninja Museum which houses hundreds of real ninja weapons, armor, tools, & documents for you to view.

The host & Ninjutsu dojo put on a bit of a show for the cameras as well, with a martial arts spectacle that wouldn't be out of place in a movie.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

764. Posted:

Tokyo Eye was on tonight! They decided to take a look into Tokyo's art scene this week.

First up they visited the Tokyo Metropolitan Building. Here, for free, you can borrow an electronic guide that will walk you through the complex, highlighting the various paintings & sculptures that decorate the complex (complete with video interviews with the artists of each piece). The electronic guide can give the tour in 5 languages (Japanese, Chinese, Korean, English, & French). There are also artistic works on the outside complex, such as a large interactive maze, that is designed after the Manhattan cityscape (this piece isn't permanent though, and will be taken down soon).

They then went to the National Stadium, the stadium that was built for the 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games. Here you can find a sculpture on display that won a gold medal in the 1936 Olympics (there were artistic events held in the event, until the 1940's). They then inspected the Olympic cauldron, and gave meaning behind the various textures in it's design (it took an expert iron craftsman 3 months to make it). Finally, they looked at a couple of mosaics in the main stands. One is of the Greek goddess Nike, the other of the founder of Sumo (both symbolizing sports in their native countries). You can tour the stadium for now (and sporting events will continue to go on here until January 2014), but next year it will be demolished in order for a new stadium to be built for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.

They then talked about Tokyo Creative Weeks, a 5 week long event that happens every autumn, hosted by the Tokyo University of the Arts, the biggest art school in Japan. They showcased various floats that were being built for the event's parade. Most of which took inspiration from classical Japanese art, although one had a 50's looking anime mech design, called "Retrofuture". The float that got the most attention is called "Bird of Destruction", which features a hawk made out of traditional Japanese instruments catching the Giant Catfish (believed to cause the nation's earthquakes in ancient times). This float symbolizes the memory of the 2011 East Japan Earthquake.

Also part of TCW, 14 business' in the area are hosting art pieces submitted by college students. At Fuji Dry Cleaning, they are showcasing a piece called "Area 431" (it encompasses the entire second floor, and is meant to invoke the image of a scientific laboratory). A butcher shop in the area is showcasing a projection onto it's shutters (when it closes up), with the projected film representing lonliness in a big city. (Fun Fact: I noticed some sort of Fullmetal Alchemist advertisement on the butcher shop's door)

Then they went to Hokusai-Dori, a street named after a famous Ukiyo-e artist of the same name. He was believed to have been born on this street, with many of his most famous works being displayed on street lights aling the street.

Then they went to Sumida Ward, to check out it's famed gardens. People in Tokyo often display their plants outside, but here especially, with all sorts of fantastic greenery around. People will reuse old containers to hold their plants.

Finally, they stopped off at the Sumida Triphony Hall. There are various artistic works based on sound here, such as door handles designed to look like human ears and stair railings that are meant to convey supersonic vibrations. Their most noticeable piece is a wooden sculpture of a pianist, but at first glance it looks like he has no piano to play. However, when viewed from above, it's clear that the entire floor looks like a set of piano keys. Backstage, there are over 70 paintings of tranquil waterfalls, put there with the intention of calming the performers' pre-show jitters.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

WingedSnagret

765. Posted:

At some point I like to have a vacation in Japan. A friend of mine has been to Tokyo once and said it was awesome.

Heck, if Nintendo still had those Love Hotels I would have my honeymoon in one. ;)

Biggest Pikmin fan on NL!

Avian fact of the week: The Moa, an extinct relative of ostrichs and emus that inhabited New Zealand, was the tallest bird that ever lived at 12 ft tall (3.6 m). It was also the only known bird to have no wing structure.

3DS Friend Code: 4081-5821-0404 | Nintendo Network ID: WingedFish64

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

766. Posted:

WingedSnagret wrote:

At some point I like to have a vacation in Japan. A friend of mine has been to Tokyo once and said it was awesome.

Heck, if Nintendo still had those Love Hotels I would have my honeymoon in one. ;)

Yeah, I don't think I'll ever move to Japan, but I'd love to visit, even if it was for a week or something.

There's so much for you to do, too. If I had the chance to visit Tokyo, the top things on my list would be to go see a Tokyo Giants baseball game, visit Akihabara (for my love of gaming & anime), sightsee at places like Tokyo Skytree & the main shrine where it was believed Ameteratsu is enshrined, check out at least one gaming arcade in the city, and of course dig into the side alleys to find a good mom & pop restaurant or two.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

DoodleDudeShow

767. Posted:

I went back in 2007.

I have to say it is by far the most amazing country I have ever been to..

The people are so kind, the technology is amazing and the food is great..

Oh Japan how I miss thee...

Check out the latest thrilling Nintendo Let's Play and become a friend of the show. Can't wait to see ya!!

http://www.youtube.com/user/DoodleDudeShow

Twitter: DoodleDudeShow

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

768. Posted:

Ugh, I got caught up in a game and missed last night's episode of BEGIN Japanology...

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Fikachu

769. Posted:

Pardon me for the double post

Looks like my plan to move to Japan backfired

[url=http://www.mybannermaker.com][/url]

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

770. Posted:

Fikachu wrote:

Pardon me for the double post

Looks like my plan to move to Japan backfired

May I inquire as to what went wrong?

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Fikachu

771. Posted:

RR529 wrote:

Fikachu wrote:

Pardon me for the double post

Looks like my plan to move to Japan backfired

May I inquire as to what went wrong?

I consulted with my dad and I told him even though I wanted to move to Japan, I instead chose to settle down in Egypt after finishing college

[url=http://www.mybannermaker.com][/url]

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

772. Posted:

Journeys in Japan was on tonight!

This week's host was Charles Glover (an American actor who has appeared in a number of period samurai dramas), and they went to the city of Kawagoe. It's an old castle town just north of Tokyo, and was once the northern defense point of Edo (Tokyo's old name). It was founded some 550 years ago, and the powerful merchant trade they had with Edo allowed them influence over rice pricing in both the old capital & Osaka.

The Shingashi River was the most important trade route between the two cities, and during Kawagoe's peak period aroind a century ago, up to 100 boats a day would gather at it's shores. Kawagoe would ship down rice & lumber, while Edo would send seafood & the latest culture back. An old wholesaler building from the time has been converted into a museum.

It has kept much of it's old time charm, with up to 6 million tourists (both foreign & domestic) visiting each year. The merchants grew so powerful here, that many of the old shops still tower over main street, and can be visited by guests. They used a sturdy construction that was designed to contain fires (in fact, many have scars of fires past). The Kojo Theatre Group puts on old time theatre entertainnent, that lets their audience travel back in time (one of their more popular shows, features period firefighting stories).

The host also came across a street dubbed Candy Alley. There are over 20 family run shops here that make traditional hand made sweets. The host was allowed to watch one such shop make it's sweets (the family has run this shop for over 100 years).

The host also visited the Yamaya restaurant. It's an extravagant high class establishment, that a wealthy merchant built on his private villa a century ago. Merchants used to hold parties here, with expensive food & geishas.

What the citizens are most proud of however, is the annual Kawagoe Festival, which is held during the third week of October. It was initially started to raise spirits after a devastating fire centuries ago, but has risen to being an important cultural festival. Over 15 elaborate floats move through the city streets during the event, each one weighing over 4 tons & being worth around $1,000,000! A repesentation of the "goddess" of wealth & revelry sits atop the eldest float on parade.

Other things important to the festival are the Tenko no Mai dance (a dance said to bring a good harvest, performed by someone dressed up as a Tenko, a magical creature from Japanese mythology), and traditional paper lanterns, which are made here in Kawagoe, by a shop called Ichirikisai. The eleventh generation owner is passing on his craft to his son (they say it would be humiliating to have a lantern last less than 10 years, and were happy to have a recent customer request them to repair a 65 year old lantern).

The city is about a 30 minute train ride from Tokyo, with some other attractions being Kawagoe Castle, an old clock tower, and a folk crafts shop that sells masks commonly worn during the Kawagoe Festival.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Romeo

773. Posted:

i have to say.. japan is one of the very few countries which truly intrigues me...
next year i'll try to go there for a few weeks/months, i don't know when exactly yet though

could imagine living there later on... japanese is also the only language im truly interested in learning
there are many things i've always liked about japan, but one of the main things would be the girls/women of course =)

Edited on by Romeo

Romeo

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

774. Posted:

Tokyo Eye was on tonight! This week they showcased Jimbocho, a neighborhood famous for it's bookstores.

There are over 200 bookstores in the neihborhood, 80% of which deal in used books. During nice days, bins full of books will line the street outside of shops, and there are literally walls of books (left completely unattended, due to the low crime rate). It's said that there are over 10 million books in the area!

The host first stopped off at one of the neiborhood's oldest shops, which is known for it's extensive collection of classic Noh theatre scripts. In fact, they sell pocket sized scripts for merely ¥200. They also sell vintage Noh props.

The host then went to the Book & Neighborhood Information Center. Here, tourists can find bookstores they'll be interested in. Just give them your general interests, and they'll give you recommended stops.

Through this method, the host came by a shop that specializes in both vintage Japanese & western books. Of most interest, were the small paper books that were given to the nation's earliest western visitors. They told classic Japanese fairy tails, and were often translated to English, French, Spanish, & German. The shop sells them today for ¥38,000. They also sell issues of a satirical magazine published by British entrepreneurs from the 1860's to 1880's, called The Japan Punch (it dealt with Japan's modernizing culture). They sell those for a whopping ¥120,000 each!

They also have a shop that deals in magazines from the 50's, 60's, & 70's. Their stock mostly consists of fashion magazines, comes from all across the globe, and including Japanese publications, features popular western titles such as Esquire, Seventeen, Vouge, Newsweek, & Playboy.

They also have a bookstore specializing in Italian books, although they have also expanded to feature Portuguese & Spanish publications as well. Some of their most popular items are Italian translations of manga like Astro Boy, Detective Conan, Lupin III, Doraemon, One Piece, & Naruto.

A popular stop for tourists is the Sakura Hotel. This establishment has a multilingual staff, and book lovers from across the globe come to stay here (during filming, they had quests from United States, Britain, France, Mexico, South Korea, Canada, Spain, Germany, and China, as pointed out by the flags they had displayed behind the receptionist desk). Rooms cost around ¥4,000-¥6,000, and they have a café that stays open 24 hours a day, so you can read books comfortably. They also have a food menu that features cuisine from around the world, with their most popular item currently being Canadian Style Pancakes (topped with butter, smothered in maple syrup, and sprinkled with bacon bits).

It's not just books you can find in Jimbocho, however. The area also has around a dozen shops dealing in Ukiyo-e paintings. One such shop has a couple of vintage prints from a famous artist, that go for an astounding ¥1,300,000 & ¥3,800,000 respectively. They have a price range for everyone, though, with replicas of certain pieces going for around ¥5,000.

They also stopped by Fuji Records, a shop that deals in vinyl records. They have a collection of over 100,000, featuring records from overseas as well as Japanese recordings. They have a record player that lets you sample your purchases.

There's another shop that deals in traditional Japanese nicknacks, but is most known for their traditional Japanese instruments, such as the Shamisen. There's a studio next door where visitors can get Shamisen lessons, with the first being free.

Finally, they stopped off at the Rakugo Café. During the day it's an unassuming café for book lovers, but at night, traditional Rakugo performances are held. Rakugo is a form of traditional storytelling, where the storyteller will play all the parts. It costs around ¥2,000 to attend a show, and they usually last around 2 hours. Most shows are held in Japanese, but they hold special events where you can experience the stories in English & French.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Magikarp3

775. Posted:

RR529 wrote:

[strong]There are over 200 bookstores in the neihborhood, 80% of which deal in used books. During nice days, bins full of books will line the street outside of shops, and there are literally walls of books (left completely unattended, due to the low crime rate).

I think I just found my new home :o

I'm not even that much of a reader, I just really enjoy looking through used book stores and seeing what stuff I can find. It's a shame you don't really get many of these in the west, and all of the good ones have closed down :(

http://backloggery.com/oiiopo

always thought I'd change to Gyarados after I turned 20 but hey, this is more fitting I guess. (also somebody registered under the original Magikarp name and I can't get back to it anymore orz)

3DS Friend Code: 3952-7233-0245

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

776. Posted:

BEGIN Japanology was on tonight! It was a repeat (the episode where they discussed the role of Used Books in Japanese society).

Jollykarp wrote:

RR529 wrote:

[strong]There are over 200 bookstores in the neihborhood, 80% of which deal in used books. During nice days, bins full of books will line the street outside of shops, and there are literally walls of books (left completely unattended, due to the low crime rate).

I think I just found my new home :o

I'm not even that much of a reader, I just really enjoy looking through used book stores and seeing what stuff I can find. It's a shame you don't really get many of these in the west, and all of the good ones have closed down :(

Yeah, from what they've shown, Jimbocho has a really unique vibe, and I'd probably browse around if I ever get to go to Tokyo.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

Cyb3Rnite

777. Posted:

I'm going to Tokyo in a few months with my family. I'm always nervous visiting a country with a different language, especially if most of them don't speak English well ^^;

"I've learned to fear the white lady. She does not gain power. Instead, she destroys yours."

Currently playing: Super Smash Bros. Kerfuffle (3DS), Fantasy Life
Things I probably should be making progress on: Rune Factory 4, Mario Kart 8, Wind Waker HD, Gods Eater Burst

3DS Friend Code: 4554-0880-9460 | Nintendo Network ID: Cyb3Rnite

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

778. Posted:

Journeys in Japan was on tonight! This week they went to the city of Odate in Akita prefecture, to check out the famed Akita Cedar. The host this week was John Neptune, an American who has been living in Japan for nearly 40 years, and is a professional Shakuhachi player.

Firstly, the host went into the valley next to the Yoneshiro river, to get a close up look at the cedars themselves. In order for a cedar to be designated as an official Akita Cedar, it needs to have grown in the wild (as opposed to farmed), and be at least 150 years old. The average Akita Cedar here is about 50 meters tall, but the oldest specimen here (at 300 years old) is 58 meters tall (as tall as a 20 story building).

The city of Odate was prosperous for it's timber output in years past, with the Yoneshiro river being the means of transporting the timber (until 50 years ago, the logs would be tied together into rafts, and sent downstream). The demand for Akita Cedar has waned in modern times, so this is naught but a memory of the past. However, a retired citizen of the area wants to preserve the area's legacy, so his hobby is making canoes from Akita Cedar, and during weekends, he takes children & tourists out on the river, to indulge in nature & learn the area's history.

In the city proper, many small local shops sell edible plants that have been farmed or picked in the area (beans, mushrooms, etc). The host visited one local shop that makes Koji, steamed rice that is imbued with a certain mold. It is used to both pickle vegetables & as an ingredient in soy sauce. It is cultured in trays made from Akita Cedar (which happens to be perfect for temperature regulation) in temperatures of 40ºC. The trays have been passed down for 100 years. John was then invited to join the shop owner's family for dinner (where many of the local dishes incorporate Koji).

Lastly, he visited a crafts shop in the city, that is keeping traditional woodworking technique alive. They have a special method of bending the cedar wood without breaking it (thin strips of the wood are soaked in 80ºC water to soften it up), creating some unique hand made merchandise (the techniques passed down are 400 years old). There most popular items are their bento lunchboxes.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

779. Posted:

Tokyo Eye was on tonight! Tonight they had a "Souvenir Special", for those looking to bring back gifts to their friends & family.

Firstly they went to the city's central hub, Tokyo Station! There are many souvenir shops here, with most of them dealing in snacks. One of their most popular items is Brick Bread (¥250), which is bread filled with custard & bean paste, and designed to look like one of the building's bricks ("Tokyo Station" is printed on it as well). There are also character specific shops here, such as a Hello Kitty shop that sells a similar snack for ¥735 (though in the shape of the titular feline). Japan's top potato chip maker has a shop here as well, and for ¥280, you can get a cup of chips fresh out of the fryer.

Next they went to a new shopping complex that has opened up in Asakusa. It has many Japanese style nicknacks that tourists love (such as chopsticks, tea cups, & the like). There's also a shop here called Shinobi-Ya, which as you can guess, is ninja themed. You can buy ninja inspired clothing, as well as umbrellas that are disguised as swords. There is also a Sumo themed shop, where you can get figurines of your favorite wrestlers, and Sumo wrestler shaped chocolate.

They then went to the city's largest antique shop, Antique Mall Ginza. You see, Kimonos are on a lot of tourists' wish lists, but between ¥200,000-¥500,000, they are often too expensive. Here, you can get a nice Kimono (with Obi) for a mere ¥2,000.

One of Tokyo's oldest stops for tourists Oriental Bazaar, is still here & doing quite well. One of their more popular items are "Bonsai Kits", which allow you to grow a simple bonsai for a mere ¥950.

In Shinjuku, there is a unique shop called Daiso popular amongst tourists. All items here cost only ¥100 each! They have items such a calendars, clocks, watches, & the like. Here are their top three selling items. #3 Folding Fans (great as both a decoration or for use), #2 Socks (they have hundreds of different varieties), #1 Erasers (Japan is famous for their intricate erasers that are molded expertly to look like food).

For the technologically inclined, Yodobashi Camera is a must. All of Japan's most modern electronics can be found here, and their staff is quite used to dealing with foreigners. There most popular items are rice cookers. They also have cordless vacuums, which run on a rechargeable battery, and allow for greater mobility (you can also take out the battery, that has a USB port, that way you can use it to charge your phone).

A couple of other shops they brushed by were Tokyu Hands, which is the place to go for Japan's latest stationary (such as erasable markers) & model kits (Japanese castles are a popular item here), and Animate, a must stop for anime fans (they have a very extensive cosplay selection).

Lastly they stopped by Mitsyuyoshi Makeup Laboratory. Here you can learn to apply Kabuki style makeup formations (a skill which you can take home). Lessons cost ¥2,000, and you must get a reservation in advance.

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)

AuthorMessage
Avatar

RR529

780. Posted:

Been awhile since I updated this. Tokyo Eye was on last night! They showcased various company museums throughout the city, many of which are free attractions (or have a very low fee).

They first went to a museum set up by a large pharmaceutical company in the city, where you can learn about their various products. they have a large interactive display that shows how various types of medicine process through the body. this is free.

They then went to a paper museum, that showcases the history of papermaking in Japan. Using a cardboard recycling technique, guests can make their own paper. This is free.

They then visited the Yebisu Beer Factory museum. It showcases the history of the brand (it was made under the guidance of master German brewing companies). Free for a tour, ¥500 for a tour & glass of the beverage.

They then went to the Tokyo Printing Museum, which is set up by a large printing company. They actually showcase the history of printing throughout the world, with a large array of exhibits (such as a couple of pages from the first Gutenburg Bible that was printed with moveable type, and one of the first documents ordered by the Shogunate to be printed by moveable type). They also have modern exhibits, such as the world's smallest micro book, which was made with their state of the art printing technology. Guests can have a chance to try out old style printing techniques (on a first come basis). Admission is ¥300.

They then went to a tire museum, set up by a tire company. They have interactive exhibits showing advancements in tire technology (such as tires that can keep their shape for a long time after being punctured), and exhibits that explain the different types of tires. It is free.

They then went to a museum set up by a large tech company, that makes components for rockets, ships, & planes. You are first greeted by a robot. They have many scaled versions of their various ship & plane models on display, as well as the first rocket engine developed by a Japanese company. They also have an interactive plane flight simulator, where you sit inside the cockpit & try flying & landing a plane (including hazards such as rainy & nighttime conditions). You can also sit at a computer & design your own ship and/or plane. Can't remember admission for this one (might be free).

Currently Playing:

Godzilla: Smash 3 (AND)
Summoners War: Sky Arena (AND)
Salvo Saga (AND)