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Topic: Japan Discussion

Posts 641 to 660 of 853

Lzeon

Yup, let's go to North Korea instead!!

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Harrison_Peter

Blaze wrote:

Also passed my hundredth kanji, yay~

おめでとうございます! Keep it up!

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RR529

J-Melo was on tonight!

It was the debut of the rock group, End Of The World, who performed "Holy Forest" (very upbeat sounding beat, that would fit perfectly in a Tales game, with very bleak lyrics behind it...), "Love the warz" (very fast paced! Again with the dark meaning underneath), "Sleeping Beauty" (Again, an upbeat sound with melancholy lyrics), and "RPG" (An actual upbeat song, about a group on a grand adventure. Parts of it sounded reminiscent of classic Final Fantasy, IMO).

They've previously performed under the name of Sekai No Owari, and they showcased a montage of their various music videos. Songs included: "Maboroshi No Inochi" (Phantom Life), "Nijiro No Senso" (Rainbow Colored-War), "Tenshi To Akuma" (Angels and Devils), "Fantasy", "Kachofugetsu" (Beauties of Nature), and "Starlight Parade".

What name they perform under depends on which of their group is on vocals (as the two sing a different set of their songs).

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

Currently Playing: Samurai Warriors: Katana

Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

Turnip

I got タイム トラベラーズ for the PSP, and I now realize that my Japanese knowledge (or lack thereof) is nowhere near being enough to read Japanese games.

Edited on by Turnip

Cringing is really fun.

CanisWolfred

@RR529 "RPG" was a very good song, I must say. Going straight into my Youtube folder. Though I should note that it's a Sekai No Owari song, and it's deffinitely different from the first two songs. Too much synth in those.

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RR529

@FadingEuphoria, ah, Time Travelers I see! Didn't know that was released on PSP.

@CanisWolfred, yeah, I liked that one too (especially since it didn't have the dark undertowns). If my iPod was working, I'd probably download it.

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

Currently Playing: Samurai Warriors: Katana

Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

RR529

Journeys in Japan was on today! Today they went to Naha, Okinawa.

They visited the reconstructed Shuri Castle, the home of the former Okinawan royalty. It was it's own nation (known as the RyuKyu Kingdom) for around 450 years. Due to being surrounded by more powerful nations, they focused on diplomacy, rather than military might.

They then visited a studio, where traditional Okinawan dance is still passed down to this day. They also interviewed the head of the establishment. It is believed traditional dance originated as part of an old religious ritual. The host was given a quick lesson.

Instead of building shrines or temples, traditional Okinawan religious practices designate certain natural elements as sacred, and the host visited one such tree.

The host then visited a facility where traditional Bingata textiling is practiced. It is an honored facility, that has been around long enough to have produced clothing for the island's royalty. Everything is done by hand. The intricate designs are inspired by Chinese stencil dyeing. The tradition almost died out during WWII, when many anchient works were destroyed during the fighting, and artists didn't have materials to work with.

They then ventured to a modern fashion studio, where traditional Bingata patterns are worked into modern clothing styles.

It takes a flight around 2 and a half hours to reach Naha from Tokyo. Monorail is a good way for tourists to get around the city.

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

Currently Playing: Samurai Warriors: Katana

Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

Rukiafan7

I'm part Japanese "1/128th " so I do love the culture, but I'm sad that the scars from the huge Japanese quake and tsunami are still noticeable in the natural landscape of the region.

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RR529

Imagine-Nation was on tonight! It was a repeat (I covered it in comment #618).

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

Currently Playing: Samurai Warriors: Katana

Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

RR529

Had to miss Tokyo Eye today, sorry.

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

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Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

RR529

BEGIN Japanology was on today! They covered the world of Parcel Delivery.

It's big business in Japan, where private companies (not unlike UPS) pick up and deliver parcels across Japan. Cost is determined by the size of your particular package (measured by color coded tape), and they will deliver anything from normal packages, to frozen or fresh goods, all within a day.

The idea started up in 1935, when the railroad ministry started up a delivery service for parcels, but the fledgeling idea was cancelled during the war. During the 1970's a private company took the challenge, when they discovered they could make more profit by delivering 1 ton worth of smaller goods, rather than a singular 1 ton package. To this day, they are still the largest parcel delivery service in Japan (They've even branched out to other parts of Asia, with plans to internationalize all of their branches).

Depending on where the package is being delivered, it will be moved by dolly, bicycle, van, train, or even plane. There are over 9,000 logistics centers in Japan, where parcels are sorted (if a package is going particularly far, it will go to one of the many logistics terminals, which each serve around 60 logistics centers). Drivers are particularly courteous, and will go as far as delivering packages to a particular part of the home (as opposed to on the doorstep/hall), and will thank the person whom they're delivering to (a custom which foreign drivers, in their other Asian operations, had a hard time adapting).

The first van specialized for parcel delivery was unveiled in 1981 (allowing easy acess to the cargo from the front), and all these years later, nothing much has changed other than more space, and hybrid engines. Each driver has a small kit of tools, such as a portable printer, and a terminal which they use to manage their deliveries, and it meows when they get a new job (a cat is their mascot).

They even have a senior care service, which in addition to delivering daily goods to the recipients, checks up on their health. This service is a joint venture between parcel delivery services & supermarkets, and took off after the earthquake disaster in 2011.

Smaller companies are trying to offset environmental & traffic pollution, by using smaller vehicles which run on natural gas (rather than petroleum), express trains which run at night (can cut van trips down by 16,000 a year), and are starting to employ three wheeled electric vehicles.

Next week, the topic will be Pro Wrestling.

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

Currently Playing: Samurai Warriors: Katana

Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

RR529

On YouTube, Gamespot has a 30 minute video entitled Lost Between Levels: Japan Beyond Tokyo.

The video sees them interviewing devs from Osaka & Kyoto (Such as Platinum, Dimps, Nintendo, and Comcept), and they discuss how these companies are combating the recent lack of creativity found in Tokyo based developers. Also discussed is why Japan hasn't experienced an indie revolution, and how they can change that.

They do have it split up into 6 easier to digest videos, but I suggest watching the full thing (as you'll miss out on the Miyamoto interview otherwise).

BTW, I was going to mention this in the Universal YouTube Recommendations Thread, but I think it'd be a better fit here.

Avatar: Kagero (FE Fates: Birthright)

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Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

Magikarp3

I really do wonder about this "indie revolution" issue. There's a lot of good stuff that comes from the Japanese doujinshi scene, Touhou being the prime example, but they don't really rack up the sales as much as western indie games do.

Maybe we just need a few more people like Carpe Fulgur.

http://backloggery.com/oiiopo

always thought I'd change to Gyarados after I turned 20 but hey, this is more fitting I guess. (also somebody registered under the original Magikarp name and I can't get back to it anymore orz)

RR529

Magikarp wrote:

I really do wonder about this "indie revolution" issue. There's a lot of good stuff that comes from the Japanese doujinshi scene, Touhou being the prime example, but they don't really rack up the sales as much as western indie games do.

Maybe we just need a few more people like Carpe Fulgur.

They said that why Japan hasn't had an indie revolution, isn't because their aren't talented indie devs out there, but due to cultural differences, they don't really release their games online.

Unlike western indie devs who have easy ways of getting their content on the marketplace, it's awfully tough for a Japanese indie dev to get their game out, unless they have the backing of a big name compamy (like Namco Bandai, Tecmo Koei, ect). Furthermore, there due to the doujinshi culture, many Japanese indie devs are just happy distributing their games to their friends, and leaving it at that (meaning we're probably missing out on some revolutionary stuff).

They did highlight a new convention though, that's aiming to bring Japanese indie games to the spotlight, and make indie devs more comfortable sharing their ideas.

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Recently Beat: Shantae & the Pirate's Curse, Tales of Vesperia, Kirby's Dream Land 2

Skogur

Well with Japanese indie-titles such as Cave Story or more recently La-Mulana having a global audience, It sure does not look like there going in another direction. Though I have no idea how profitable those have been compared to western indie-titles.

Also, seeing that some in this thread are studying Japanese, I have a question to ask. What kind of practice/learning system have you people developed to learn Kanji at a regular basis? As I'm soon to hit my summer-vacation, I would like to learn as much as possible during that time.

Skogur

Magikarp3

Skogur wrote:

Well with Japanese indie-titles such as Cave Story or more recently La-Mulana having a global audience, It sure does not look like there going in another direction. Though I have no idea how profitable those have been compared to western indie-titles.

Also, seeing that some in this thread are studying Japanese, I have a question to ask. What kind of practice/learning system have you people developed to learn Kanji at a regular basis? As I'm soon to hit my summer-vacation, I would like to learn as much as possible during that time.

I'm not learning Japanese atm, but I know that with Kanji it really depends on what you're having trouble with. Do you find writing harder, or do you find assigning the pronunciations to the characters harder? With writing, the best way to do it is just to keep tracing out the characters and to notice the little quirks in each character. Quite a few will also look like what they describe. With pronunciations, it'll generally help to keep a vocabulary list, maybe through flash cards, and just keep constantly practicing.

http://backloggery.com/oiiopo

always thought I'd change to Gyarados after I turned 20 but hey, this is more fitting I guess. (also somebody registered under the original Magikarp name and I can't get back to it anymore orz)

Blaze

Skogur wrote:

Well with Japanese indie-titles such as Cave Story or more recently La-Mulana having a global audience, It sure does not look like there going in another direction. Though I have no idea how profitable those have been compared to western indie-titles.

Also, seeing that some in this thread are studying Japanese, I have a question to ask. What kind of practice/learning system have you people developed to learn Kanji at a regular basis? As I'm soon to hit my summer-vacation, I would like to learn as much as possible during that time.

Personally I'm just using the book 'Remembering the Kanji' coupled with Anki for revision and stuff. So far it seems to be working reasonably well; 300 kanji completed in about 3 weeks with an hour-or-so of study a day. :3

Edited on by Blaze

Skogur

@Magikarp I guess that's mainly writing I need to focus on, as I've only gone trough how to read Kanji when practicing vocabulary. So far it's not been too difficult to memorize the pronunciations that depends on the context. But I'm curious on how many characters or how many times a day would be appropriate if I want to study in a stable, daily level.
And where to start, really. If someone are aware of a ''most frequently used Kanji'' list, or something similar.

@Blaze Might check that one up, thanks! ^^

Edited on by Skogur

Skogur

Blaze

Skogur wrote:

I guess that's mainly writing I need to focus on, as I've only gone trough how to read Kanji when practicing vocabulary. So far it's not been too difficult to memorize the pronunciations that depends on the context. But I'm curious on how many characters or how many times a day would be appropriate if I want to study in a stable, daily level. And where to start, really. If someone are aware of a ''most frequently used Kanji'' list, or something similar.

Well, really you need to learn the 2200 Joyo kanji to be able to read Japanse material. Those are the kanji which the Japanese themselves learn. Apparently knowing all 2200 show enable you to read a Japanese newspaper, but many less and you'll probably just end up reading fragmented sentences which isn't great. :/

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