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Topic: I need a new TV...I need a new everything, HALP ME!!!

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Matthew010

I've got a Samusung TV and I saw a noticeable inmprovement in picture quality and colour on the Switch compared to an older Toshiba TV. Samsung TV's in my opinion are great for Switch.

Matthew010

Joe-b

For the money Hisense is pretty good. They also make all Sharp tv's sold in the US. We have 2 and they seem to be reliable and look and sound good. Samsung and LG are prob the top 2 as far as all the reading I have done. TCL is pretty good as well. RCA back in the day used to buy components from them...

Joe-b

ThanosReXXX

@Joeynator3000 EuroGamer wants you to turn off your adblocker? What browser are you using, and are you on PC or on a smart device? I've got two adblockers active (ABP and uBlock Origin) on a Firefox browser and I've no issues whatsoever.

Oh, well, let's see if this works, then:

Digital Foundry: the best 4K TVs for HDR gaming 2019

Updated with the latest models including OLED, QLED and regular LED.
Guide by Will Judd, Senior Staff Writer, Digital Foundry
Updated on 10 December 2019

It's never been a better time to buy a 4K HDR TV for gaming, as the enhanced consoles have become ubiquitous, mid-range gaming PCs are now capable of 4K and a new console generation isn't far off either. It's an exciting time in the world of TVs too, with 4K HDR becoming standard on all but the cheapest sets and new technologies boosting graphical fidelity and responsiveness. What follows are our recommendations for the best gaming TVs from the 2018 and 2019 model years.

When looking at a 4K HDR TV for gaming, one of the most important metrics is input latency, which measures how long it takes for your buttons presses to translate into in-game actions. The best 4K HDR TVs offer input latency of around 20ms or less, average models around 30ms, and slower screens react in 40ms or more; generally a difference of about 15ms between two screens is noticeable. However, you'll only accomplish these speeds by engaging gaming modes, which go by different names on different televisions.

As well as input latency, we'll also be looking at how these televisions handle motion, their peak brightness figures, which HDR formats they support and the strength of their built-in smart TV interface. Of course, price is a prime consideration as well. Right now, more expensive OLED sets start at around $1700/£1700 for a 55-inch display while LCD models at the same size can cost less than half of that amount. There are also even cheaper options that provide relatively poor HDR but still deliver a lot of screen for the money.

Apart from making our TV recommendations, we'll also let you know which features are in the pipeline and what you can expect from gaming TVs over the next year. We'll also give a quick rundown of the four major panel types used in 4K HDR TVs - OLED, QLED, VA and IPS - so you have a basic idea of what their typical strengths and weaknesses are, in case you're considering a TV that isn't on this list.

So these are our top recommendations for gaming-friendly 4K HDR televisions in 2019, including budget, mid-range and high-end options. Use the quick links below to skip ahead, or read on for the full selections.

Best 4K TV for HDR gaming overall
Best value OLED for 4K HDR gaming
Best non-OLED TV for 4K HDR gaming
Best mid-range choice for 4K HDR
Best value 4K TV for HDR gaming
Best budget 4K TV for Americans
Best small 4K TV for HDR gaming

LG B9/C9 (OLED): the best 4K TV for HDR gaming
c9

55 inches (£1499/$1599), 65 inches (£2299/$2499) or 77 inches (£6999/$5499)
Buy from Best Buy with free shipping
Buy from John Lewis UK with five year warranty
Black Friday deal: £999 for 55-inch B9 OLED at Currys

LG's new C9 model is our current top recommendation, thanks to its gorgeous OLED display which features excellent motion processing, extremely low input latency (~13ms in its gaming modes at 60Hz, ~6ms at 120Hz) and the inclusion of forward-looking HDMI 2.1 ports which should work well with next-gen consoles and PC graphics cards. Image quality, colour reproduction and contrast are top-notch thanks to the OLED panel used, although Samsung's QLED sets are able to hit higher peak brightness figures. The LG C9 doesn't come with FreeSync, but it does support HDMI VRR, a similar adaptive sync standard supported on the Xbox One X and - as of a recent firmware update - on PCs with Nvidia RTX 20-series and GTX 16-series graphics cards as well.

4K HDR content is where the C9 sings, but the television also handles lower-resolution content with aplomb thanks to excellent upscaling and full OSSC and Framemeister compatibility for retro gaming. The LG TV's webOS software is also arguably the best on the market, thanks to an intuitive and responsive interface that includes easy Wiimote-style selection and rapid multitasking.

If you're operating to a stricter budget, the LG B9 uses an older processor but provides near-identical image quality, low input lag and so on - making it a clever way to save a few hundred without making a significant sacrifice.

Pros

HDMI 2.1 will allow 4K/120Hz when HDMI 2.1 source devices are released
Extremely low input latency when using gaming modes
Black frame insertion enables better motion processing
Excellent scaling for lower-resolution sources

Cons

No option for filter-free 720p or 1080p upscaling
No FreeSync support for PCs with AMD GPUs
DolbyVision and HDR10 are supported, but HDR10+ is missing

LG B8/C8 (OLED): Best value OLEDs for 4K HDR gaming
lg_c8_spidey

B8: 55 inches (£1199/$1099) or 65 inches (£1599/$1403)
C8: 55 inches (£1359/$1449) or 65 inches (£1999/$1976)

Buy the LG B8 from Amazon.com
Buy the LG B8 from Amazon.co.uk

Buy the LG C8 from Amazon.com
Buy the LG C8 from Amazon.co.uk

LG's 2018 OLED models, the C8 and B8, have reached new low prices with the release of the LG C9 and remain excellent TVs for 4K HDR gaming. While you don't get HDMI VRR support and input latency isn't quite as low, the same top-notch OLED panel is used, BFI is included and scaling from low-res sources is excellent. The LG B8 uses an older processor than the C8, but there isn't a significant difference in image quality or performance between the two models. Therefore, we recommend the cheaper B8 for most people.

Pros

Same awesome OLED panel as LG's 2019 models
Low input lag and black frame insertion for better motion processing
Excellent scaling for lower-resolution sources

Cons

Input latency higher than 2019 flagships
No FreeSync or HDMI VRR support

Samsung Q90/Q90R (QLED): best non-OLED for 4K HDR gaming
q90

55 inches (£1999), 65 inches (£2499/$2597) or 75 inches (£3499/$3999)
Buy from Amazon.com with free shipping
Buy from Best Buy with free shipping
Buy from Amazon.co.uk with free shipping
Buy from Currys PC World with free shipping

While OLED TVs are impressive, they are expensive and may be prone to burn-in in extreme cases. They also can't match the brightness of high-end LCD displays. If you've decided against OLED for whatever reason, Samsung's QLED TVs are a good alternative. The flagship-grade Q90 we're recommending sports truly excellent brightness, peaking at over 1300 nits in HDR content, while great local dimming allows for contrast ratios of 11,000:1. Note that peak brightness and contrast are reduced when compared to last year's Q9FN, but improvements in viewing angles and input lag make up for this in our eyes.

Input lag is also a strong point for this television with HDR content at 4K responding in an impressive 15ms while game mode is enabled. FreeSync support is included too, which is handy when playing games on the Xbox One or PC. Of course, this TV does have some minor flaws as well, with subpar viewing angles (despite improvements over last year's model) and an occasionally laggy Tizen smart TV interface. Still, given its strengths, the Q90 makes a compelling argument against OLED.

Pros

Support for 4K 120Hz (albeit only on one HDMI port)
Excellent brightness and low input lag in game mode
Good motion handling with black frame insertion
Variable refresh rate (FreeSync) support on Xbox One and PC
No risk of burn-in

Cons

Black levels and viewing angles don't compare to OLED
Tizen OS is intuitive but can exhibit slowdowns and includes ads
No DolbyVision support, but HDR10 and HDR10+ are supported

Samsung Q60R: the best mid-range choice for 4K HDR
q60r

43 inches (£649/$649), 49 inches (£764/$749), 55 inches (£869/$899), 65 inches (£1169/$1199) or 75 inches (£1799/$1799)
Buy from Currys with free shipping
Buy from Best Buy with free shipping

The Samsung Q60R is the cheapest QLED monitor in Samsung's 2019 arsenal. While its VA panel can't compare in colours, brightness or contrast to a more expensive OLED, it still looks great with SDR and HDR content and its motion handling is superb. The Q60R is a particularly canny pick for gamers, as it comes with one of the lowest input lag figures we've seen, at around 14ms while in game mode. If you use the TV at 120Hz at 1080p or 1440p - something regrettably only afforded to the 55-inch and larger models - this decreases to around 10ms. FreeSync variable refresh rate support is also included on the larger models, which is a boon to Xbox One and PC owners.

Pros

Incredibly low input lag for at 1080p or 4K (14ms)
Excellent motion handling with fast response times
Good contrast ratio (6000:1) and decent uniformity
Supports FreeSync and 120Hz at 1080p or 1440p

Cons

Mediocre viewing angles due to the choice of a VA panel
Significantly more expensive in the UK than in the US, at time of writing
Mediocre sound quality, although soundbar bundles are offered
High refresh rates and FreeSync not available on 43-inch and 49-inch models

Samsung RU8000 (VA): best value 4K TV for HDR gaming
ru8000

49 inches (£645/$649), 55 inches (£682/$699), 65 inches (£949/$999), 75 inches ($1499) or 82 inches (£2295/$1999)
Buy from Amazon with free shipping
Buy from Samsung UK with free shipping
Buy from Best Buy with free shipping

Samsung's RU8000 is an excellent choice for 4K HDR gaming for those on a tighter budget. The TV boasts some of the best input lag we've seen for a 4K HDR set and includes deep blacks for excellent contrast as well - even if it's not quite as good as an OLED TV. This TV's lower price point is evident in its disappointing viewing angles, which result in colour shifts if you're sitting even slightly off-centre, and its implementation of local dimming is lacking as well. Motion handling is solid though with the option for black frame insertion. The Tizen software that Samsung includes on this set is also not ideal, with occasional home screen ads and annoying slowdowns on occasion. Finally, the cheapest 49-inch model doesn't support FreeSync, so we would recommend the 55-inch model or larger if you're going to be using this television with a PC or Xbox One.

Pros

Excellent input lag at 1080p or 4K with SDR and HDR content (~18ms)
Good contrast ratio for a VA panel (5500:1)
Good motion handling with black frame insertion
Variable refresh rate support (FreeSync) on 55-inch and larger models

Cons

Poor local dimming
Disappointing viewing angles
Tizen OS is intuitive but can exhibit slowdowns and sometimes includes ads

TCL R625 (VA): the best budget 4K TV for Americans
tcl_r617

55 inches ($599) or 65 inches ($799)
Buy from Amazon.com with free shipping [?]

TCL is well known for its budget televisions in the US, and for good reason - it has some of the best in the business, delivering mid-range features at cut-down prices. The R625 we're recommending here is perhaps the best example with a 55-inch 4K HDR screen costing less than $600. With that, you get input lag that's among the best we've seen as long as game mode is enabled (~11ms) whether you're gaming in SDR or HDR at 1080p or 4K. Other benefits include a clean and sensible Roku TV interface, excellent contrast (~5000:1) and good motion handling too. However, this TV does exhibit the typically narrow viewing angles of VA panels, making it less suitable for sharing a film with friends or indulging in couch co-op. Another potential issues is the grey uniformity, which can make scenes with motion appear a little cloudy. However, this does vary from panel to panel, so you may not find it to be an issue. While TCL do offer television sets in Europe, the R625 doesn't appear to be one of them - shame.

Pros

Excellent input lag with game mode enabled (~11ms)
Top-notch contrast for a VA panel (5000:1)
Excellent brightness regardless of content

Cons

Not available in Europe
Very limited viewing angles
Grey uniformity issues on some units

LG UK6300 (IPS): the best small 4K TV for HDR gaming
lg_uk6300

43 inches (£323/$269), 50 inches (£369/$343), 55 inches (£525/$459) or 65 inches (£649/$616)
Buy from Amazon with free shipping [?]
Buy from PRC Direct with free shipping
Buy from Best Buy with free shipping

For anyone that wants a small TV for 4K HDR gaming that offers a great size vs price ratio, the LG UK6300 is a good option. It's available in Europe and the US - unlike our TCL budget pick - and it's available as small as 43 inches, which is a good fit for smaller spaces like bedrooms or offices. The IPS panel offers low input lag, at 12ms in game mode, even with 4K HDR content. Viewing angles are also a point of pride here, with better results than even more expensive VA TVs. The downside to this kind of panel is that contrast is subpar, with relatively low peak brightness values and blacks that look more like grey, which limits the effect of HDR content. The IPS panel also uses four subpixels, RGBW vs the standard RGB, which reduces clarity for fine details like text, making the UK6300 a poor choice as a PC monitor. Still, if you'll use this TV primarily for console or PC gaming, this could be a great shout despite its limited HDR capabilities (It's worth mentioning that PC monitors can work well in this role too, so check out our picks for the best gaming monitor of 2018.)

Pros

Superior input lag (~12ms) in game mode
Better viewing angles than VA TVs
Clean and responsive webOS smart TV interface

Cons

Poor contrast results in overly bright dark scenes and doesn't do HDR justice
Grey uniformity issues produces a cloudy picture in some scenes
Relatively poor colour accuracy out of the box

Is it a good time to buy?

As we mentioned in the intro, it's a great time to upgrade to a new TV, as major HDR standards have emerged and best-in-class OLED TVs have become more affordable than ever. 2019 model year televisions have arrived, so 2018 models are seeing deep price reductions - so you can either grab a 2018 model to save some money or a 2019 model to get the latest features.

One of the most important technologies for 2019 and 2020 TVs will be the inclusion of HDMI 2.1, a new standard that includes support for higher resolutions at higher frame-rates than ever before, including 8K 60Hz and 4K 120Hz support. As well as more raw data throughput, the new standard also includes features designed for gamers, like HDMI variable refresh rate and automatic low latency mode, which should make gaming more responsive, even at lower framerates.

The first 8K TVs are now on sale - although they're limited to 30Hz at present - and LG's flagship C9 4K OLED includes four HDMI 2.1 ports, making it quite future-proof. However, no one has yet tested the full feature set, as no HDMI 2.1 devices are on the market yet; this tech will start being truly useful when next-generation games consoles and PC graphics cards hit the market over the next few years. In the meantime though, you can expect to see high-end features like FreeSync variable refresh rate support on more TVs, while backlight dimming and higher contrast figures to trickle down to more affordable models.

Display types

With the death of plasma displays, there are two major display types used in modern displays: LCD and OLED, with LCD representing the lower and mid-range of the market and OLED the high-end. LCD displays can be broken down further too, into IPS, VA and QLED displays. Here's what you need to know about each one, in order from cheapest to most expensive.

IPS: These monitors provide good viewing angles and improved colour accuracy compared to monitors using VA panels. However, some IPS panels, particularly older ones, can suffer from slower response times, making them worse for fast-paced games. Another potential issue is 'IPS glow', where the monitor's backlight is visible in dark scenes.

VA: A type of monitor panel which tends to occupy a middle-ground between IPS and cheap TN displays in many respects. These panels generally offer the best contrast, backed with good response times and colour reproduction. However, viewing angles and colour gamut may be limited compared to IPS and OLED.

QLED: This confusingly-named panel type from Samsung is essentially a VA panel that has been upgraded with quantum dots, allowing the monitors to produce slightly wider viewing angles than standard VA panels, plus higher brightness levels and wider colour gamuts. However, as is typical for a VA display, motion handling can be subpar.

OLED: This high-end display tech uses organic light-emitting diodes which produce what is arguably the best picture. Contrast is a strong suit, as individual pixels can be turned off completely to create a true black, rather than the very dark grey that other monitor types can produce. Viewing angles are also impressive, ensuring the picture from a 45-degree angle looks as good as the screen viewed dead-on. HDR is also well catered for, thanks to the ability to see extremely light and dark areas side-by-side. However, OLED can be expensive, its brightness can't compete with traditional LCDs and motion handling can be poor on some models. Image retention or burn-in is also a concern, although it is unlikely to occur through normal use, even when gaming.

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

ThanosReXXX

@Joeynator3000 Okay, so it doesn't work entirely as planned: the pictures didn't get pasted into the quote, and neither do the shop links, but at least you'll get all the info you'll need.

Long story short: look for LG models B8/C8 or B9/C9. Those two specific model lines are simply the best value for money.

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

sixrings

@Joeynator3000 I bought a Sony. And for some reason the tv leaned back on the stand so it was meant to be either placed pretty low or wall mounted. The smart features sucked but it had good reviews. In the end I returned it for the Samsung which people said had the best smart features. Something I thought I had zero interest in. But once having it I can't imagine having a normal tv again.

Btw Sony makes oled tv's they just cost even more than the LGs. They look stunning though.

Edited on by sixrings

sixrings

Eel

@Joeynator3000 If you look into the source code, you can usually disable those "turn off your adblock" messages and reenable scrolling.

Works perfectly for the quick article.

Bloop.

My dead channel.

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My Nintendo: Abgarok | Nintendo Network ID: Abgarok

BlueOcean

Joeynator3000 wrote:

Alright, so my current TV, it's small, but it's still 1080p and my switch looks perfectly fine for the most part.

Despite this, it's still old and cheap (as in, it only has 2 HDMI ports and..and multi-colored ports? I forget what they're called, lol). I'm capable of getting a newer and better TV, but...I'm not entirely sure what to get. I was thinking of sticking with another 1080p, but this OLED thing I've heard about interests me. Then I found out that they stopped making 1080p TVs with OLED...so now I'm wondering if it's worth getting a 4K with OLED.

So, how does the Switch look on a TV like this? I've heard so many mixed stories about it being blurry, or input lag, or SOMETHING. Ugh, why is this so difficult for me? xD (also heard results change depending on the game itself. o_0)

Also which brand? I've heard LG does the best OLED 4K TV...?

Get an LG OLED TV if possible. Image quality and contrast are the best and input lag is ridiculously low at 13ms, at least on the 2019 models (e.g., C9):

https://www.lg.com/uk/tvs/lg-OLED55C9PLA

I got one recently and tried Wii U on it and games look great because the TV upscales very well 1080/720p signal. Xbox One X games look incredible, in between.

Moreover, it's bright enough for HDR too, for your other/future consoles because Switch doesn't support HDR. It also supports variable refresh rate and has HDMI 2.1 which is the new standard supported by Xbox One X and next-generation consoles: Xbox Series, PS5 and probably Switch's successor.

BlueOcean

sdelfin

@Joeynator3000 I picked up a Sharp 40-inch 1080p TV from Best Buy several months ago. They had a decent selection of 40-43 inch TVs then. I've heard people seem pretty happy with the TCL brand as well. These are all low-end TVs which is just fine for me. I have no issues with the picture quality or anything like that. At this point, it's hard to find non-smart TVs. But remember that you do not even have to connect it to the network if you do not want to.

I'm not particularly interested in 4K, HDR, or OLED. With OLED, I don't care about its benefits like deeper blacks(I have no complaints about black levels on LCD). You have to determine if OLED's benefits are worthwhile to you. The one thing with OLED that must be mentioned(it's apparently in the TV's manuals) is image retention. I do not want to imply that it's a major issue in real-world usage. Image retention is, if you're unaware, when static images, or portions of the image(like video game elements), on screen for a long time remain on screen when the screen is off. As I understand it, the TVs have compensation methods now to make this less of an issue. I don't have OLED so I can't tell you how much of an issue this is. I don't think this would affect most people(unless you have a bad panel or something odd) under normal usage. But it is also an extra concern. It's one that I, personally, would not even want to think about. So I would stick with normal LCD panels in my TV shopping, but I'm also not really into much in terms of features.

sdelfin

BlueOcean

Image retention is not in issue in modern OLED panels because they have automatic features to avoid image retention. This is my first OLED TV but I've read reviewers that have stated that this was never an issue even with panels that they had constantly on for testing and I have heard from owners of older models and they haven't complained about this issue. It's basically an issue overblown by Samsung because they sell LCD TVs (but OLED smartphones ). Yes, OLED is more expensive but not as expensive as it was just a few years ago and the difference in quality is worth the price difference in my opinion.

Edited on by BlueOcean

BlueOcean

Joeynator3000

...Ugh, woke up to a bunch of posts/text. x_X Didn't think my thread would get this much attention. xD
Yeah I don't think I would have any issues with screen burn-in or whatever, I never have static images on-screen for very long. SNES Classic is a maybe with the borders, but...eh, I rarely play that anyways. People have said that it's rarely an issue these days.

But yeah, I'm just curious about OLED and how my games would look, I don't know why. xD

Pokemon Stream Clip
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BlueOcean

@Joeynator3000 I would describe the OLED image quality as more natural and richer. I don't have a normal Switch but the Switch Lite but I tried the SNES Classic Mini and Wii U and they both look great considering the 720p signal. Wii U can output 1080p but just a few games really use that resolution: Rayman Legends, Super Smash Bros. 4, Twilight Princess HD and The Wind Waker HD if I remember correctly. Oh and the LG TVs come with a Wiimote. Obviously, it's not a Wii Remote but a remote controller that can work as a Wii Remote for navigating the menus and it's really smooth and precise unlike the Wii Remote sometimes.

Edited on by BlueOcean

BlueOcean

ThanosReXXX

@Joeynator3000 What exactly DID you think was going to happen if you posted a genuine question?

If I were you, I'd just walk into the nearest TV store, and check out some screens in real life, before ordering one from anywhere. It is true that LG has the best screens right now, because if you cross-reference all current tests, their TVs come out on top the most times, in both high end and mid range tiers, but there's also a little factor called personal taste and/or desire, so it also depends on if you're very critical about frame rate, lag, good color contrasts such as deeper blacks, and future proof options, such as latest versions of HDMI support for future consoles, and HDR and such.

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

Joeynator3000

Hey a lot of my threads end up dying or "drowning" in a day or so. xD

Also yeah I've seen 4K already, and I'm not entirely sure about OLED, but...you always see a movie or some "trailer" thing instead. I'm just thinking "...What if Monster Hunter GU was being played instead, or Thumper?" lol

According to a video I found last night, it seems LG's OLED TVs can handle Switch perfectly. Still would have to see for myself.

Pokemon Stream Clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZmNX5mNuNc

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Keep it PG-13-ish.

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sdelfin

@BlueOcean I know of a case of image retention from someone I watch on Youtube from July 2018. A year and a half is both not very much time, but also a very long time when it comes to tech. Perhaps OLEDs got better and image retention is not an issue now. I did mention that TVs have compensation methods and I tried to downplay the likelihood of it happening in normal use, but I also did want to make sure the original poster was aware of it. If he's like me, it's a possibility that is not even worth the hassle when I think LCD is great. But I've seen the image retention replicated, intentionally and unintentionally, even with TVs having compensation methods. In the case of the Youtuber I mentioned, his pixel refresher worked, but the image retention was an issue, and I think that's something people should know if they are considering OLED but don't know that it has special concerns. I mentioned twice that it's likely not an issue in normal usage, but I also don't know if his usage would be normal. Mine certainly isn't, as I leave my TV on, displaying a PC desktop, for long stretches. But as I understand it, I wouldn't claim that OLED image retention is not an issue at all either, even if it wouldn't affect most people. I haven't seen evidence that the issue has been fully eliminated. I don't know if Samsung has overblown anything, but I've never used them as a source on this.

sdelfin

Joeynator3000

Yeah, only thing that I leave on is my monitor, only time my TV is static is if it's paused on a movie. Even then, after like...5 or 10 minutes the Bluray will go into screen-saver mode and then eventually turn off along with the TV itself.

As for SNES Classic and the borders, I dunno, but I don't play that much these days and not for that long anyways. Any other paused game it's not for that long, otherwise I would just turn the Switch off anyways. lol

Pokemon Stream Clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZmNX5mNuNc

Discord server: https://discord.gg/fGUnxcK
Keep it PG-13-ish.

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Joeynator3000
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sdelfin

@Joeynator3000 I just mentioned it to be thorough. And I agree, from your use case, I don't think you'd have any reason to be concerned at all. You'd have to leave the same image up for several hours for it to even begin to be an issue, and many hours more for it to possibly be permanent. The case I mentioned from 2018 was a fluke and the user did not intend for the TV to be on(and the problem was temporary). So you should be just fine if you want OLED. In my case, aside from not wanting to deal with possible retention, I also didn't want to buy more TV than I needed, and OLED seems more upscale as a feature, so I wasn't going to look at them because of the market segment as well. Good luck in your search. My advice to you is to work your way through the features. Narrow down the size, then determine resolution and everything else based on what's left. There's always a better TV out there, so don't worry about what else is available after you make your choice. Even with 4K dropping in price further, I have no complaints about my new 1080p TV.

Edited on by sdelfin

sdelfin

Woomy_NNYes

@sdelfin @Joeynator3000 Here's a cnet article from last month reguarding screen burn-in.
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/oled-screen-burn-in-what-you-need...

To keep the thread focused on getting a new tv, it's ok if you don't reply to this.

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sixrings

If I was going to buy a 4k I'd buy a qled since I think it looks nearly as good as a oled without the burn in issues. That's my personal opinion though. On the other hand I think I'd just look for a good 1080p tv. It's cheaper and then later on you can upgrade when Nintendo gets on board.

sixrings

ThanosReXXX

@Woomy_NNYes Most important takeaways from that article you posted:

So if the fear of the mere possibility of burn-in is your primary concern, the decision is simple: buy an LCD-based display instead. But know that you're sacrificing the best picture quality that money can buy.

and

Here are some points to keep in mind:

  • Burn-in is possible with OLED, but not likely with normal use.
    • Most "burn-in" is actually image retention, which goes away after a few minutes.
    • You'll almost certainly see image retention long before it becomes permanent burn-in.
    • Generally speaking, burn-in is something to be aware of, but not worry about.

@Joeynator3000 Instead of another text wall, I'll just post two separate and independent test videos:

P.S.

Forgot to mention earlier: about those colored inputs on your TV, that you mentioned earlier: those are either AV inputs, or component video inputs. If they're yellow, red and white, it's the former, and if they're red, blue and green, then it's component inputs.

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Nintendo Network ID: ThanosReXX

Joeynator3000

Yeah I get the names mixed up sometimes, lol.
I also know about QLED, but it seems that has issues with "ghosting" or something and OLED is probably better for gaming or something.

I also looked up that LG's TV's have something that deals with the image retention stuff, so there's that as well...? o.o

Pokemon Stream Clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZmNX5mNuNc

Discord server: https://discord.gg/fGUnxcK
Keep it PG-13-ish.

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Joeynator3000
Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/joeynator3001

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