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Topic: A protracted conversation between fans of pop-culture that anyone can jump into

Posts 2,081 to 2,100 of 2,114

Solea

The Animatrix had such a great selection of groovy dance stuff.

Is anyone a JunkieXL fan?

"Hands Around My Throat"'s pretty bangin', too

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

5t3v3n

@Ralizah sorry, was gonna reply to your comment after I’d completed Layton... but never got around to it again after playing Odyssey, then thinking about playing Pokemon, but ended up waiting till xenoblade 2 to play something. It’s a really fun game actually. Haven’t played the original xenoblade but I have it on 3ds but I have to get around to swapping my data to the new 3ds... so I’ve just been playing my Switch since March really...

@EdFairway my iPad restarted upon update a while ago and I forgot to sign back in to nlife to get messages, my bad . I’ve heard people say that it wasn’t exactly what they were anticipating but that it’s still enjoyable and that mario karts cycle is now canon lol

5t3v3n

5t3v3n

@Solea ooo yeah I’m a fan of this song, it reminds me of some of the music from Extreme G racing games on the N64... I wonder if they’ll ever bring those games back?... 🤔

5t3v3n

Solea

@5t3v3n

You're now my hubby, 'cuz I love this '90s cinematic break-beat/pretentious-4-on-the-floor type stuff, too!

I played the (better) F-Zero games instead and snubbed my nose at these janky pretenders to the asphalt like Extereme-G

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

5t3v3n

@Solea some tunes are just good no matter the genre or time that they were released.

And certain games I just happened to miss out on the snes, like F-zero, secret of series, Chrono series etc. so when F-zero came to N64, I was non the wiser, having no previous experience playing it, thus didn’t buy it D:

yeah, extreme G in hindsight was probably a poor mans F-zero (even the name is somewhat similar) but looking back at racing titles in general, it was quite unique for it solely using bikes, it felt great to make turns. I still remember the code to get all the bikes unlocked like ‘Roach’ and ‘Neon’, it was 81GGD5 lol

Edited on by 5t3v3n

5t3v3n

Solea

@5t3v3n

Dude, I only recently got back on the F-Zero internet-bandwagon and spent most of the 64 era playing Ubisoft's S.C.A.R.S. and Rare's Bond game.

I'm no better than you are and were...

Just trying to be funny

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

Solea

@5t3v3n

From the Wikipedia entry:

"S.C.A.R.S. (standing for Super Computer Animal Racing Simulator, although unmentioned) is a racing video gamefeaturing cars that are shaped like animals."

That how hipster I was.

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

Ralizah

@5t3v3n I'm enjoying Xenoblade 2 so far, but I never really cared for the original. With that said, I seem to be alone in that opinion. I certainly hope you enjoy it when you get around to it.

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

5t3v3n

@Solea I thought you might be, so was just going along for the ride . It’s funny that some games are good even 10 or 20 years laters, and hold up well, but others, even if they were amazing for it’s time, weren’t as much later on. Same for movies/cartoons. The thunder cats opening theme is still as majestic as I remember it being, and the animation upon research was done by a Japanese studio (figures) but the episodes themselves are almost unbearable to watch, snarf and all.

@Ralizah me too. Even though there’s quite a bit to get used to in the battle system, I find it really fun connecting combos together and such. Plus the game rewards you for exploring the vast open environments also, so doing both at the same time doesn’t seem like a waste of time to me, that and all the side quests, which there are tons of them, just makes for an overall enjoyable experience. Thanks, will do . That’s if I ever get round to it, there’s already quite a few games coming in 2018 which I’m interested in (Pocket Rumble where were you?) and we’ve still got the Jan direct coming as well so.... yeah

5t3v3n

Solea

@5t3v3n

What'll hold up — I think — is usually a playable core beneath all the pretty dressing.

I've braved some pretty smeary pre-rendered stuff to play Planescape and, while clunky, it still holds up because of its weighty role-playing substance. There are dialogue text trees that initiate when you rifle through your inventory and equip something described to be cursed. Like your character measuring the benefits versus consequences of a ring that punctures his flesh for a few stat boosts. I got better equipment later on and my slots were filling up so I hovered over the malignant thing and lo... game gave me option to bite ring-finger off but spared nothing in detailing the "nameless-one"'s agony 😨

Pulled so many adjectives for "festering-wound" out of its arse!

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

5t3v3n

@Solea I agree. It’s the main mechanics of a game that defines whether it’ll age well primarily. Although, if there’s a certain part of a game that is just ‘fun’ or engaging, I think that can work too. Or if it’s got a good story/narrative that’s just as thought provoking as the first time you played it.

I quite enjoy puzzle and puzzle-esque games like Myst, Dizzy and Sudoku and point’n’click games like simon the sorcerer/monkey island/discworld. The first StS was voiced by Chris Barrie, who was ‘Rimmer’ from Red Dwarf. Just listening to his sarcastic quips at my failed tangential attempts of logic, always puts a smile on my face

5t3v3n

Solea

From this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LN2LZSuG7Y

To this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rwGD45YuUk

Now, guys, I really hated being the dude who hated anime for its more egregious targeting of otaku specific kinks. But, I'll be that s***-head 'cause one of these things establishes character with ambience and situational dialogue: dialogue in situ and en route to wherever they're being ferried. The other does this too... but watch as they introduce the character by contriving skirt chase and white-knight complex to drum up scenario

@Ed_Fairway, @5t3v3n and @Ralizah Will and can everything be Persona-lite?

I don't like endangered women anymore.

Edit: Watch the first 6 (or so) minutes of both to get where the dread is coming from.

Edited on by Solea

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

Ralizah

@Solea Ah, kabedon, you show your ugly face again!

Not sure I'd say the guy in the second clip is white-knighting, though. All things considered, he didn't seem particularly worried about the girl to begin with. Both just seemed... annoyed.

Also, I wouldn't call that skirt-chasing so much as sexual harassment.

Still, I get you: if you judged Japan by its anime, you'd probably walk away with the idea that roving delinquent rape gangs were a common phenomenon in the country. I guess you could talk about how the trope is reflective of sexist attitudes in Japanese media, although, as I've discovered, that's not often helpful: explaining something away as "sexism" is as easy to do as explaining pretty much anything away with so-called "evolutionary psychology."

Although I would also credit the second clip for being more immediately engaging. I almost fell asleep watching that ferry drift in the first one.

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

Solea

Ralizah wrote:

@Solea Ah, kabedon, you show your ugly face again!

Not sure I'd say the guy in the second clip is white-knighting, though. All things considered, he didn't seem particularly worried about the girl to begin with. Both just seemed... annoyed.

Scoundrel! Let me be reductive!

Although I would also credit the second clip for being more immediately engaging. I almost fell asleep watching that ferry drift in the first one.

That's cuz you can appreciate something for being more immediately effective while disregarding the premise being conveyed. Those with a working/academic knowledge of structure and individual techniques used to tell stories are this way, I'm finding.

Being less book-smart, I appreciate that they were, at least, doing something steamy and/or sexy with the intro for the first vid. It covered for the interest they failed to generate with their script (for the scene). Especially since it's just stuff they say to show that they'll be questing so HARD!/soft wherever they're being taken.

I feel the same way about Blade Runner 2049 and the old one. Lovely to look at and interesting to contemplate, but I don't know if I need another "uprising" epic in the same way that I don't know if I can stomach more kabedon.

Edited on by Solea

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

Ralizah

@Solea Well, I can appreciate that the first game was going for a moody opening... I just don't think it was particularly evocative. And something moody that isn't evocative just becomes boring.

Compare to the opening of something like Silent Hill 2:

All things being equal, I've largely lost interest in the idea of "fiction-as-storytelling" over the years. Not that I can't appreciate a particularly well-structured narrative, but more that, once you expose yourself to enough media, it becomes almost impossible not to see the cultural atoms that compose the structure of the work. Richard Dawkins can talk all he wants about rainbows not losing their beauty when you understand what's actually causing them, but the truth is that there is a sort of magic in not seeing the seams connecting reality (or, in my case, fiction) together.

Which is why I've taken to thinking of narrative, not as the point of a piece of fiction, but rather, as one of the elements that allows it to provoke a particular mood, emotion, or thought in the consumer. And, thinking back to my favorite stuff... it all follows this pattern. End of Eva? All about provoking thoughts and emotions. Thomas Ligotti fiction? Narrative is just a means for the writer to communicate the horror of existence to the reader, with the actual style of his writing being equally important. Blade Runner 2049 (my favorite American film in... ever)? The "uprising" narrative you mentioned is hardly important, with the actual bulk of the story mostly focusing on the protagonist's search for meaning and legacy in the ashes of his cyberpunk reality, which connects thematically to the mood the director is going for with his sweeping, nightmare-like panorama of the future. Kairo? Ideas and moody mood moods.

Which is probably why I've recently been taken back in by the ridiculous yet undeniably effective romantic feels porn of Makoto Shinkai. I cannot wait to watch the DVD of Your Name I received as an early christmas present.

Although I can still really appreciate fiction that is strong in the character department. I watched Fate/Zero recently. The plot is a convoluted, nonsensical mess, like Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure meets Mirai Nikki meets Game of Thrones, but Gen Urobuchi managed to use this material as the foundation for a marvelous character drama. Every character in that show either complements or contrasts with multiple other characters almost perfectly, and so we get lovely dynamics like a weirdly touching bromance developing between child murderers, chivalry and utilitarian practicality clashing between gender-bent King Arthur and the zealous mercenary she's serving, a wimpy college kid learning life lessons from Alexander the Great, etc.

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

Solea

@Ralizah

Maybe, Ralz, your having replied to a post made after the instigating one has distanced what we were comparing: Tokyo Xanadu's and Xanadu Next intro is no SILENT HILL 2 James Sunderland in derelict bathroom rubbing face to the starkness of Yamaoka's scalpel against bone backing track!

I can't wait till that Blade Runner Blu-ray comes around and I get what you've gotten out of it. It was sooooooooooooooo beautiful :0

Edited on by Solea

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

EdFairway

Ralizah wrote:

@
All things being equal, I've largely lost interest in the idea of "fiction-as-storytelling" over the years. Not that I can't appreciate a particularly well-structured narrative, but more that, once you expose yourself to enough media, it becomes almost impossible not to see the cultural atoms that compose the structure of the work. Richard Dawkins can talk all he wants about rainbows not losing their beauty when you understand what's actually causing them, but the truth is that there is a sort of magic in not seeing the seams connecting reality (or, in my case, fiction) together.

Which is why I've taken to thinking of narrative, not as the point of a piece of fiction, but rather, as one of the elements that allows it to provoke a particular mood, emotion, or thought in the consumer.

So subtext rather than the text itself?

Based on the wisdom of Carlin: "You're born into this world with a ticket to the show. When you get an internet connection, you have a front row seat"

Solea

@EdFairway

More like workable metaphors that heartless people like him can cling to and mine ad infinitum.

"You wipe the rim of that bottle and I'll knock you out from my present vantage."

Ralizah

I'm interested in the potential of fiction to offer unique artistic experiences through exploiting the unique aspects of the medium. Thus my professed belief that the best example of a medium is usually something that can't be directly translated to another medium without losing something essential in the process. Narrative is necessary but not sufficient in this regard. Instead, it must be cohesively unified with the form and idea of the piece to allow for the experience of it to be transcendent.

Incidentally, I once had a philosopher friend who parted ways with me in... an unpleasant fashion... after I told him that, despite my long-standing interest in philosophy, I wasn't interested in it as a method of evaluating reality or discovering truth. Instead, I find that a proper philosophical grounding can have particular aesthetic merits, and that I enjoy reading philosophy to the extent that it lends a flavor to life. Thus why I enjoy Nietzsche and Camus so much, and can't stand the drier analytical tradition. This was a bridge too far for him: he called me, in no uncertain terms, a "nihilist," and I have only heard from him once since (to complain about Trump, of course, because the Donald is eventually going to worm his way into every aspect of human life).

Edited on by Ralizah

Switch FC: SW-2726-5961-1794

EdFairway

@Ralizah
Intriguing points on both medium and philosophy. On best examples of a medium, Nier: Automata; UI integrated into plot and setting; my personal favourite moment being the degrading graphics from the results of in-game hacking.

Based on the wisdom of Carlin: "You're born into this world with a ticket to the show. When you get an internet connection, you have a front row seat"

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